6 inspiring alpine homes

The alpine environment provides a stunning backdrop, but also a unique landscape for design and materials ethos too.

Words by ArchiPro Editorial Team

New Zealand's alpine regions have some of the most unique landscapes in the country: craggy rocks and endless golden tussocks, framed above by barren or snow-covered peaks.

This landscape provides a fertile ground for inspiring architectural designs, and for creating houses that sit in their surroundings in a complementary and harmonious way.

Here are six alpine houses that fit perfectly into their environments.

Brewer House by Condon Scott Architects

Photo: Simon Larkin
Photo: Simon Larkin

This 440m² Wanaka home sits nestled on the toe of a tussock-covered hill. From above, it looks as if many houses have been stitched together, with multiple roof lines and angles. But this is just part of the way the building works with the environment, rather than against it – kinking in the middle to avoid overtaking the rocky terrain in behind.

The adaptation and accommodation to the land becomes the backbone of this home’s structure, with two bedroom wings angling off the main living area. The change in shape also helped Condon Scott Architects to avoid the home being too rectangular—all the better to fit in with the jagged natural structures of the mountainous surrounds.

Photo: Simon Larkin
Photo: Simon Larkin

Stelvio, The Peak by Mason & Wales Architects

Photo: Jamie Cobel
Photo: Jamie Cobel

Whether you're outside looking at the elegant concrete, stone and black steel exterior of the building, or you're inside looking at Queenstown, Lake Wakatipu and the scenery beyond, there is no shortage of incredible views at this expansive holiday home designed by Mason & Wales Architects.

Set into the land on the highest site on Queenstown Hill, visitors can drive into the garage on the lower level of the house and enter the home through a glass door into a lobby complete with floating staircase and lift to take them to the main levels—a suitably luxurious entrance for such a magnificent home.

Photo: Jamie Cobel
Photo: Jamie Cobel

Lower Shotover House by Wyatt + Gray Architects

Photo: Marina Matthews
Photo: Marina Matthews

When the brief for a home is ‘adventurous’, you can be sure something unique will result, and that's exactly the case for this sleek home designed by Wyatt + Gray Architects. With the Shotover River as the main view from the house, and Coronet Peak looming up behind it, the beautiful nature of the surroundings called for a striking design to match.

The roofline evokes an aeroplane wing slicing through the alpine air and resting atop the glass-and-steel fronted house in an apparently gentle, almost weightless manner. Concrete walls and floors provide thermal mass that helps the home stay warm in winter and cool in summer.

Photo: Marina Matthews
Photo: Marina Matthews

Black Peak House by Eliška Lewis Architects

Photo: Simon Devitt
Photo: Simon Devitt

Height restrictions in Wanaka didn't stop Eliška Lewis Architects from building a spacious and open home with fantastic views. Sitting on a large site at the end of a quiet cul-de-sac, the house is designed to follow the sun as it treks through the sky, ensuring this home captures the sunlight almost every hour of the day.

While it undoubtedly looks stunning, great care has been taken to give the house high performance too. Passive design principles, including a sandwich-layered floor of timber and concrete, as well as highly insulated walls and an airtightness membrane.

Photo: Simon Devitt
Photo: Simon Devitt

Cardrona River House by Mason & Wales Architects

Photo: Dennis Radermacher
Photo: Dennis Radermacher

Stone, timber and glass come together in this 400m² holiday home designed by Mason & Wales Architects. The design language is very much inspired by the surrounding landscape, with views looking out over the Cardrona River, front and centre.

A sharp, sloping roofline is broken only by two large schist chimneys poking through. Viewed from the home's mostly glass frontage, they create a strong textural contrast with the jagged and asymmetrical stone leaping out from the building's otherwise crystalline face.

Photo: Dennis Radermacher
Photo: Dennis Radermacher

Remarkables House by Wyatt + Gray Architects

Photo: Blair Mckenzie
Photo: Blair Mckenzie

Halfway up the foothills of the Remarkables, on the edge of an artificial tarn sits this dramatic and playful home from Wyatt + Gray Architects. Schist-clad fins punctuate the building's front of glass, timber panelling, and stainless steel, as a small wooden jetty extends out into the centre of the mirror-like water.

The roofline is especially unique, with both sides of the house tilting down towards the centreline of the structure in a series of V formations, inspired by the mountain ranges that sit behind it.

Photo: Blair Mckenzie
Photo: Blair Mckenzie

Top banner image credit: Simon Devitt & Eliška Lewis Architects

Get in touch with
ArchiPro

Request pricing/info
Visit website
Recommended reading
In today’s technological, resource-filled world, there is no excuse for New Zealand homes to be damp, cold...
Planning for the construction sector's post-lockdown recovery has begun.
While it may be getting colder and darker out there, autumn is the perfect season to escape the city for a getaway. Just in time for the Easter break, we round up three unique architectural destinations to head to this (or any) long weekend...
 With land and house prices at a premium, shouldn’t we be filling the gaps in our cities before using up...
Still reeling from the leaky buildings debacle, most architects and designers specify tried-and-tested...
A tight labour market and material price growth in the March quarter is expected to ease in the coming...
The design is in the detail and detail is exactly where moulding experts Accumen Shapes operate. From the...
A new date for the 2020 Meet, Greet & Eat will be confirmed next week.
Building consents for new homes reach levels not seen since the 1970s.
Done tagging
6 inspiring alpine homes

6 inspiring alpine homes

The alpine environment provides a stunning backdrop, but also a unique landscape for design and materials ethos too.

Words by ArchiPro Editorial Team

New Zealand's alpine regions have some of the most unique landscapes in the country: craggy rocks and endless golden tussocks, framed above by barren or snow-covered peaks.

This landscape provides a fertile ground for inspiring architectural designs, and for creating houses that sit in their surroundings in a complementary and harmonious way.

Here are six alpine houses that fit perfectly into their environments.

Brewer House by Condon Scott Architects

Photo: Simon Larkin
Photo: Simon Larkin

This 440m² Wanaka home sits nestled on the toe of a tussock-covered hill. From above, it looks as if many houses have been stitched together, with multiple roof lines and angles. But this is just part of the way the building works with the environment, rather than against it – kinking in the middle to avoid overtaking the rocky terrain in behind.

The adaptation and accommodation to the land becomes the backbone of this home’s structure, with two bedroom wings angling off the main living area. The change in shape also helped Condon Scott Architects to avoid the home being too rectangular—all the better to fit in with the jagged natural structures of the mountainous surrounds.

Photo: Simon Larkin
Photo: Simon Larkin

Stelvio, The Peak by Mason & Wales Architects

Photo: Jamie Cobel
Photo: Jamie Cobel

Whether you're outside looking at the elegant concrete, stone and black steel exterior of the building, or you're inside looking at Queenstown, Lake Wakatipu and the scenery beyond, there is no shortage of incredible views at this expansive holiday home designed by Mason & Wales Architects.

Set into the land on the highest site on Queenstown Hill, visitors can drive into the garage on the lower level of the house and enter the home through a glass door into a lobby complete with floating staircase and lift to take them to the main levels—a suitably luxurious entrance for such a magnificent home.

Photo: Jamie Cobel
Photo: Jamie Cobel

Lower Shotover House by Wyatt + Gray Architects

Photo: Marina Matthews
Photo: Marina Matthews

When the brief for a home is ‘adventurous’, you can be sure something unique will result, and that's exactly the case for this sleek home designed by Wyatt + Gray Architects. With the Shotover River as the main view from the house, and Coronet Peak looming up behind it, the beautiful nature of the surroundings called for a striking design to match.

The roofline evokes an aeroplane wing slicing through the alpine air and resting atop the glass-and-steel fronted house in an apparently gentle, almost weightless manner. Concrete walls and floors provide thermal mass that helps the home stay warm in winter and cool in summer.

Photo: Marina Matthews
Photo: Marina Matthews

Black Peak House by Eliška Lewis Architects

Photo: Simon Devitt
Photo: Simon Devitt

Height restrictions in Wanaka didn't stop Eliška Lewis Architects from building a spacious and open home with fantastic views. Sitting on a large site at the end of a quiet cul-de-sac, the house is designed to follow the sun as it treks through the sky, ensuring this home captures the sunlight almost every hour of the day.

While it undoubtedly looks stunning, great care has been taken to give the house high performance too. Passive design principles, including a sandwich-layered floor of timber and concrete, as well as highly insulated walls and an airtightness membrane.

Photo: Simon Devitt
Photo: Simon Devitt

Cardrona River House by Mason & Wales Architects

Photo: Dennis Radermacher
Photo: Dennis Radermacher

Stone, timber and glass come together in this 400m² holiday home designed by Mason & Wales Architects. The design language is very much inspired by the surrounding landscape, with views looking out over the Cardrona River, front and centre.

A sharp, sloping roofline is broken only by two large schist chimneys poking through. Viewed from the home's mostly glass frontage, they create a strong textural contrast with the jagged and asymmetrical stone leaping out from the building's otherwise crystalline face.

Photo: Dennis Radermacher
Photo: Dennis Radermacher

Remarkables House by Wyatt + Gray Architects

Photo: Blair Mckenzie
Photo: Blair Mckenzie

Halfway up the foothills of the Remarkables, on the edge of an artificial tarn sits this dramatic and playful home from Wyatt + Gray Architects. Schist-clad fins punctuate the building's front of glass, timber panelling, and stainless steel, as a small wooden jetty extends out into the centre of the mirror-like water.

The roofline is especially unique, with both sides of the house tilting down towards the centreline of the structure in a series of V formations, inspired by the mountain ranges that sit behind it.

Photo: Blair Mckenzie
Photo: Blair Mckenzie

Top banner image credit: Simon Devitt & Eliška Lewis Architects

Get in touch with
ArchiPro

Request pricing/info
Visit website
Done tagging
6 inspiring alpine homes

6 inspiring alpine homes

The alpine environment provides a stunning backdrop, but also a unique landscape for design and materials ethos too.

Words by ArchiPro Editorial Team

New Zealand's alpine regions have some of the most unique landscapes in the country: craggy rocks and endless golden tussocks, framed above by barren or snow-covered peaks.

This landscape provides a fertile ground for inspiring architectural designs, and for creating houses that sit in their surroundings in a complementary and harmonious way.

Here are six alpine houses that fit perfectly into their environments.

Brewer House by Condon Scott Architects

Photo: Simon Larkin
Photo: Simon Larkin

This 440m² Wanaka home sits nestled on the toe of a tussock-covered hill. From above, it looks as if many houses have been stitched together, with multiple roof lines and angles. But this is just part of the way the building works with the environment, rather than against it – kinking in the middle to avoid overtaking the rocky terrain in behind.

The adaptation and accommodation to the land becomes the backbone of this home’s structure, with two bedroom wings angling off the main living area. The change in shape also helped Condon Scott Architects to avoid the home being too rectangular—all the better to fit in with the jagged natural structures of the mountainous surrounds.

Photo: Simon Larkin
Photo: Simon Larkin

Stelvio, The Peak by Mason & Wales Architects

Photo: Jamie Cobel
Photo: Jamie Cobel

Whether you're outside looking at the elegant concrete, stone and black steel exterior of the building, or you're inside looking at Queenstown, Lake Wakatipu and the scenery beyond, there is no shortage of incredible views at this expansive holiday home designed by Mason & Wales Architects.

Set into the land on the highest site on Queenstown Hill, visitors can drive into the garage on the lower level of the house and enter the home through a glass door into a lobby complete with floating staircase and lift to take them to the main levels—a suitably luxurious entrance for such a magnificent home.

Photo: Jamie Cobel
Photo: Jamie Cobel

Lower Shotover House by Wyatt + Gray Architects

Photo: Marina Matthews
Photo: Marina Matthews

When the brief for a home is ‘adventurous’, you can be sure something unique will result, and that's exactly the case for this sleek home designed by Wyatt + Gray Architects. With the Shotover River as the main view from the house, and Coronet Peak looming up behind it, the beautiful nature of the surroundings called for a striking design to match.

The roofline evokes an aeroplane wing slicing through the alpine air and resting atop the glass-and-steel fronted house in an apparently gentle, almost weightless manner. Concrete walls and floors provide thermal mass that helps the home stay warm in winter and cool in summer.

Photo: Marina Matthews
Photo: Marina Matthews

Black Peak House by Eliška Lewis Architects

Photo: Simon Devitt
Photo: Simon Devitt

Height restrictions in Wanaka didn't stop Eliška Lewis Architects from building a spacious and open home with fantastic views. Sitting on a large site at the end of a quiet cul-de-sac, the house is designed to follow the sun as it treks through the sky, ensuring this home captures the sunlight almost every hour of the day.

While it undoubtedly looks stunning, great care has been taken to give the house high performance too. Passive design principles, including a sandwich-layered floor of timber and concrete, as well as highly insulated walls and an airtightness membrane.

Photo: Simon Devitt
Photo: Simon Devitt

Cardrona River House by Mason & Wales Architects

Photo: Dennis Radermacher
Photo: Dennis Radermacher

Stone, timber and glass come together in this 400m² holiday home designed by Mason & Wales Architects. The design language is very much inspired by the surrounding landscape, with views looking out over the Cardrona River, front and centre.

A sharp, sloping roofline is broken only by two large schist chimneys poking through. Viewed from the home's mostly glass frontage, they create a strong textural contrast with the jagged and asymmetrical stone leaping out from the building's otherwise crystalline face.

Photo: Dennis Radermacher
Photo: Dennis Radermacher

Remarkables House by Wyatt + Gray Architects

Photo: Blair Mckenzie
Photo: Blair Mckenzie

Halfway up the foothills of the Remarkables, on the edge of an artificial tarn sits this dramatic and playful home from Wyatt + Gray Architects. Schist-clad fins punctuate the building's front of glass, timber panelling, and stainless steel, as a small wooden jetty extends out into the centre of the mirror-like water.

The roofline is especially unique, with both sides of the house tilting down towards the centreline of the structure in a series of V formations, inspired by the mountain ranges that sit behind it.

Photo: Blair Mckenzie
Photo: Blair Mckenzie

Top banner image credit: Simon Devitt & Eliška Lewis Architects

Get in touch with
ArchiPro

Request pricing/info
Visit website
Done tagging

6 inspiring alpine homes

The alpine environment provides a stunning backdrop, but also a unique landscape for design and materials ethos too.

Words by ArchiPro Editorial Team

New Zealand's alpine regions have some of the most unique landscapes in the country: craggy rocks and endless golden tussocks, framed above by barren or snow-covered peaks.

This landscape provides a fertile ground for inspiring architectural designs, and for creating houses that sit in their surroundings in a complementary and harmonious way.

Here are six alpine houses that fit perfectly into their environments.

Brewer House by Condon Scott Architects

Photo: Simon Larkin
Photo: Simon Larkin

This 440m² Wanaka home sits nestled on the toe of a tussock-covered hill. From above, it looks as if many houses have been stitched together, with multiple roof lines and angles. But this is just part of the way the building works with the environment, rather than against it – kinking in the middle to avoid overtaking the rocky terrain in behind.

The adaptation and accommodation to the land becomes the backbone of this home’s structure, with two bedroom wings angling off the main living area. The change in shape also helped Condon Scott Architects to avoid the home being too rectangular—all the better to fit in with the jagged natural structures of the mountainous surrounds.

Photo: Simon Larkin
Photo: Simon Larkin

Stelvio, The Peak by Mason & Wales Architects

Photo: Jamie Cobel
Photo: Jamie Cobel

Whether you're outside looking at the elegant concrete, stone and black steel exterior of the building, or you're inside looking at Queenstown, Lake Wakatipu and the scenery beyond, there is no shortage of incredible views at this expansive holiday home designed by Mason & Wales Architects.

Set into the land on the highest site on Queenstown Hill, visitors can drive into the garage on the lower level of the house and enter the home through a glass door into a lobby complete with floating staircase and lift to take them to the main levels—a suitably luxurious entrance for such a magnificent home.

Photo: Jamie Cobel
Photo: Jamie Cobel

Lower Shotover House by Wyatt + Gray Architects

Photo: Marina Matthews
Photo: Marina Matthews

When the brief for a home is ‘adventurous’, you can be sure something unique will result, and that's exactly the case for this sleek home designed by Wyatt + Gray Architects. With the Shotover River as the main view from the house, and Coronet Peak looming up behind it, the beautiful nature of the surroundings called for a striking design to match.

The roofline evokes an aeroplane wing slicing through the alpine air and resting atop the glass-and-steel fronted house in an apparently gentle, almost weightless manner. Concrete walls and floors provide thermal mass that helps the home stay warm in winter and cool in summer.

Photo: Marina Matthews
Photo: Marina Matthews

Black Peak House by Eliška Lewis Architects

Photo: Simon Devitt
Photo: Simon Devitt

Height restrictions in Wanaka didn't stop Eliška Lewis Architects from building a spacious and open home with fantastic views. Sitting on a large site at the end of a quiet cul-de-sac, the house is designed to follow the sun as it treks through the sky, ensuring this home captures the sunlight almost every hour of the day.

While it undoubtedly looks stunning, great care has been taken to give the house high performance too. Passive design principles, including a sandwich-layered floor of timber and concrete, as well as highly insulated walls and an airtightness membrane.

Photo: Simon Devitt
Photo: Simon Devitt

Cardrona River House by Mason & Wales Architects

Photo: Dennis Radermacher
Photo: Dennis Radermacher

Stone, timber and glass come together in this 400m² holiday home designed by Mason & Wales Architects. The design language is very much inspired by the surrounding landscape, with views looking out over the Cardrona River, front and centre.

A sharp, sloping roofline is broken only by two large schist chimneys poking through. Viewed from the home's mostly glass frontage, they create a strong textural contrast with the jagged and asymmetrical stone leaping out from the building's otherwise crystalline face.

Photo: Dennis Radermacher
Photo: Dennis Radermacher

Remarkables House by Wyatt + Gray Architects

Photo: Blair Mckenzie
Photo: Blair Mckenzie

Halfway up the foothills of the Remarkables, on the edge of an artificial tarn sits this dramatic and playful home from Wyatt + Gray Architects. Schist-clad fins punctuate the building's front of glass, timber panelling, and stainless steel, as a small wooden jetty extends out into the centre of the mirror-like water.

The roofline is especially unique, with both sides of the house tilting down towards the centreline of the structure in a series of V formations, inspired by the mountain ranges that sit behind it.

Photo: Blair Mckenzie
Photo: Blair Mckenzie

Top banner image credit: Simon Devitt & Eliška Lewis Architects

Get in touch with
ArchiPro

Request pricing/info
Visit website
Recommended reading
In today’s technological, resource-filled world, there is no excuse for New Zealand homes to be damp, cold...
Planning for the construction sector's post-lockdown recovery has begun.
While it may be getting colder and darker out there, autumn is the perfect season to escape the city for a getaway. Just in time for the Easter break, we round up three unique architectural destinations to head to this (or any) long weekend...
 With land and house prices at a premium, shouldn’t we be filling the gaps in our cities before using up...
Still reeling from the leaky buildings debacle, most architects and designers specify tried-and-tested...
A tight labour market and material price growth in the March quarter is expected to ease in the coming...
The design is in the detail and detail is exactly where moulding experts Accumen Shapes operate. From the...
A new date for the 2020 Meet, Greet & Eat will be confirmed next week.
Building consents for new homes reach levels not seen since the 1970s.
Done tagging
6 inspiring alpine homes

6 inspiring alpine homes

The alpine environment provides a stunning backdrop, but also a unique landscape for design and materials ethos too.

Words by ArchiPro Editorial Team

New Zealand's alpine regions have some of the most unique landscapes in the country: craggy rocks and endless golden tussocks, framed above by barren or snow-covered peaks.

This landscape provides a fertile ground for inspiring architectural designs, and for creating houses that sit in their surroundings in a complementary and harmonious way.

Here are six alpine houses that fit perfectly into their environments.

Brewer House by Condon Scott Architects

Photo: Simon Larkin
Photo: Simon Larkin

This 440m² Wanaka home sits nestled on the toe of a tussock-covered hill. From above, it looks as if many houses have been stitched together, with multiple roof lines and angles. But this is just part of the way the building works with the environment, rather than against it – kinking in the middle to avoid overtaking the rocky terrain in behind.

The adaptation and accommodation to the land becomes the backbone of this home’s structure, with two bedroom wings angling off the main living area. The change in shape also helped Condon Scott Architects to avoid the home being too rectangular—all the better to fit in with the jagged natural structures of the mountainous surrounds.

Photo: Simon Larkin
Photo: Simon Larkin

Stelvio, The Peak by Mason & Wales Architects

Photo: Jamie Cobel
Photo: Jamie Cobel

Whether you're outside looking at the elegant concrete, stone and black steel exterior of the building, or you're inside looking at Queenstown, Lake Wakatipu and the scenery beyond, there is no shortage of incredible views at this expansive holiday home designed by Mason & Wales Architects.

Set into the land on the highest site on Queenstown Hill, visitors can drive into the garage on the lower level of the house and enter the home through a glass door into a lobby complete with floating staircase and lift to take them to the main levels—a suitably luxurious entrance for such a magnificent home.

Photo: Jamie Cobel
Photo: Jamie Cobel

Lower Shotover House by Wyatt + Gray Architects

Photo: Marina Matthews
Photo: Marina Matthews

When the brief for a home is ‘adventurous’, you can be sure something unique will result, and that's exactly the case for this sleek home designed by Wyatt + Gray Architects. With the Shotover River as the main view from the house, and Coronet Peak looming up behind it, the beautiful nature of the surroundings called for a striking design to match.

The roofline evokes an aeroplane wing slicing through the alpine air and resting atop the glass-and-steel fronted house in an apparently gentle, almost weightless manner. Concrete walls and floors provide thermal mass that helps the home stay warm in winter and cool in summer.

Photo: Marina Matthews
Photo: Marina Matthews

Black Peak House by Eliška Lewis Architects

Photo: Simon Devitt
Photo: Simon Devitt

Height restrictions in Wanaka didn't stop Eliška Lewis Architects from building a spacious and open home with fantastic views. Sitting on a large site at the end of a quiet cul-de-sac, the house is designed to follow the sun as it treks through the sky, ensuring this home captures the sunlight almost every hour of the day.

While it undoubtedly looks stunning, great care has been taken to give the house high performance too. Passive design principles, including a sandwich-layered floor of timber and concrete, as well as highly insulated walls and an airtightness membrane.

Photo: Simon Devitt
Photo: Simon Devitt

Cardrona River House by Mason & Wales Architects

Photo: Dennis Radermacher
Photo: Dennis Radermacher

Stone, timber and glass come together in this 400m² holiday home designed by Mason & Wales Architects. The design language is very much inspired by the surrounding landscape, with views looking out over the Cardrona River, front and centre.

A sharp, sloping roofline is broken only by two large schist chimneys poking through. Viewed from the home's mostly glass frontage, they create a strong textural contrast with the jagged and asymmetrical stone leaping out from the building's otherwise crystalline face.

Photo: Dennis Radermacher
Photo: Dennis Radermacher

Remarkables House by Wyatt + Gray Architects

Photo: Blair Mckenzie
Photo: Blair Mckenzie

Halfway up the foothills of the Remarkables, on the edge of an artificial tarn sits this dramatic and playful home from Wyatt + Gray Architects. Schist-clad fins punctuate the building's front of glass, timber panelling, and stainless steel, as a small wooden jetty extends out into the centre of the mirror-like water.

The roofline is especially unique, with both sides of the house tilting down towards the centreline of the structure in a series of V formations, inspired by the mountain ranges that sit behind it.

Photo: Blair Mckenzie
Photo: Blair Mckenzie

Top banner image credit: Simon Devitt & Eliška Lewis Architects

Get in touch with
ArchiPro

Request pricing/info
Visit website
Done tagging
6 inspiring alpine homes

6 inspiring alpine homes

The alpine environment provides a stunning backdrop, but also a unique landscape for design and materials ethos too.

Words by ArchiPro Editorial Team

New Zealand's alpine regions have some of the most unique landscapes in the country: craggy rocks and endless golden tussocks, framed above by barren or snow-covered peaks.

This landscape provides a fertile ground for inspiring architectural designs, and for creating houses that sit in their surroundings in a complementary and harmonious way.

Here are six alpine houses that fit perfectly into their environments.

Brewer House by Condon Scott Architects

Photo: Simon Larkin
Photo: Simon Larkin

This 440m² Wanaka home sits nestled on the toe of a tussock-covered hill. From above, it looks as if many houses have been stitched together, with multiple roof lines and angles. But this is just part of the way the building works with the environment, rather than against it – kinking in the middle to avoid overtaking the rocky terrain in behind.

The adaptation and accommodation to the land becomes the backbone of this home’s structure, with two bedroom wings angling off the main living area. The change in shape also helped Condon Scott Architects to avoid the home being too rectangular—all the better to fit in with the jagged natural structures of the mountainous surrounds.

Photo: Simon Larkin
Photo: Simon Larkin

Stelvio, The Peak by Mason & Wales Architects

Photo: Jamie Cobel
Photo: Jamie Cobel

Whether you're outside looking at the elegant concrete, stone and black steel exterior of the building, or you're inside looking at Queenstown, Lake Wakatipu and the scenery beyond, there is no shortage of incredible views at this expansive holiday home designed by Mason & Wales Architects.

Set into the land on the highest site on Queenstown Hill, visitors can drive into the garage on the lower level of the house and enter the home through a glass door into a lobby complete with floating staircase and lift to take them to the main levels—a suitably luxurious entrance for such a magnificent home.

Photo: Jamie Cobel
Photo: Jamie Cobel

Lower Shotover House by Wyatt + Gray Architects

Photo: Marina Matthews
Photo: Marina Matthews

When the brief for a home is ‘adventurous’, you can be sure something unique will result, and that's exactly the case for this sleek home designed by Wyatt + Gray Architects. With the Shotover River as the main view from the house, and Coronet Peak looming up behind it, the beautiful nature of the surroundings called for a striking design to match.

The roofline evokes an aeroplane wing slicing through the alpine air and resting atop the glass-and-steel fronted house in an apparently gentle, almost weightless manner. Concrete walls and floors provide thermal mass that helps the home stay warm in winter and cool in summer.

Photo: Marina Matthews
Photo: Marina Matthews

Black Peak House by Eliška Lewis Architects

Photo: Simon Devitt
Photo: Simon Devitt

Height restrictions in Wanaka didn't stop Eliška Lewis Architects from building a spacious and open home with fantastic views. Sitting on a large site at the end of a quiet cul-de-sac, the house is designed to follow the sun as it treks through the sky, ensuring this home captures the sunlight almost every hour of the day.

While it undoubtedly looks stunning, great care has been taken to give the house high performance too. Passive design principles, including a sandwich-layered floor of timber and concrete, as well as highly insulated walls and an airtightness membrane.

Photo: Simon Devitt
Photo: Simon Devitt

Cardrona River House by Mason & Wales Architects

Photo: Dennis Radermacher
Photo: Dennis Radermacher

Stone, timber and glass come together in this 400m² holiday home designed by Mason & Wales Architects. The design language is very much inspired by the surrounding landscape, with views looking out over the Cardrona River, front and centre.

A sharp, sloping roofline is broken only by two large schist chimneys poking through. Viewed from the home's mostly glass frontage, they create a strong textural contrast with the jagged and asymmetrical stone leaping out from the building's otherwise crystalline face.

Photo: Dennis Radermacher
Photo: Dennis Radermacher

Remarkables House by Wyatt + Gray Architects

Photo: Blair Mckenzie
Photo: Blair Mckenzie

Halfway up the foothills of the Remarkables, on the edge of an artificial tarn sits this dramatic and playful home from Wyatt + Gray Architects. Schist-clad fins punctuate the building's front of glass, timber panelling, and stainless steel, as a small wooden jetty extends out into the centre of the mirror-like water.

The roofline is especially unique, with both sides of the house tilting down towards the centreline of the structure in a series of V formations, inspired by the mountain ranges that sit behind it.

Photo: Blair Mckenzie
Photo: Blair Mckenzie

Top banner image credit: Simon Devitt & Eliška Lewis Architects

Get in touch with
ArchiPro

Request pricing/info
Visit website
Done tagging

6 inspiring alpine homes

The alpine environment provides a stunning backdrop, but also a unique landscape for design and materials ethos too.

Words by ArchiPro Editorial Team

New Zealand's alpine regions have some of the most unique landscapes in the country: craggy rocks and endless golden tussocks, framed above by barren or snow-covered peaks.

This landscape provides a fertile ground for inspiring architectural designs, and for creating houses that sit in their surroundings in a complementary and harmonious way.

Here are six alpine houses that fit perfectly into their environments.

Brewer House by Condon Scott Architects

Photo: Simon Larkin
Photo: Simon Larkin

This 440m² Wanaka home sits nestled on the toe of a tussock-covered hill. From above, it looks as if many houses have been stitched together, with multiple roof lines and angles. But this is just part of the way the building works with the environment, rather than against it – kinking in the middle to avoid overtaking the rocky terrain in behind.

The adaptation and accommodation to the land becomes the backbone of this home’s structure, with two bedroom wings angling off the main living area. The change in shape also helped Condon Scott Architects to avoid the home being too rectangular—all the better to fit in with the jagged natural structures of the mountainous surrounds.

Photo: Simon Larkin
Photo: Simon Larkin

Stelvio, The Peak by Mason & Wales Architects

Photo: Jamie Cobel
Photo: Jamie Cobel

Whether you're outside looking at the elegant concrete, stone and black steel exterior of the building, or you're inside looking at Queenstown, Lake Wakatipu and the scenery beyond, there is no shortage of incredible views at this expansive holiday home designed by Mason & Wales Architects.

Set into the land on the highest site on Queenstown Hill, visitors can drive into the garage on the lower level of the house and enter the home through a glass door into a lobby complete with floating staircase and lift to take them to the main levels—a suitably luxurious entrance for such a magnificent home.

Photo: Jamie Cobel
Photo: Jamie Cobel

Lower Shotover House by Wyatt + Gray Architects

Photo: Marina Matthews
Photo: Marina Matthews

When the brief for a home is ‘adventurous’, you can be sure something unique will result, and that's exactly the case for this sleek home designed by Wyatt + Gray Architects. With the Shotover River as the main view from the house, and Coronet Peak looming up behind it, the beautiful nature of the surroundings called for a striking design to match.

The roofline evokes an aeroplane wing slicing through the alpine air and resting atop the glass-and-steel fronted house in an apparently gentle, almost weightless manner. Concrete walls and floors provide thermal mass that helps the home stay warm in winter and cool in summer.

Photo: Marina Matthews
Photo: Marina Matthews

Black Peak House by Eliška Lewis Architects

Photo: Simon Devitt
Photo: Simon Devitt

Height restrictions in Wanaka didn't stop Eliška Lewis Architects from building a spacious and open home with fantastic views. Sitting on a large site at the end of a quiet cul-de-sac, the house is designed to follow the sun as it treks through the sky, ensuring this home captures the sunlight almost every hour of the day.

While it undoubtedly looks stunning, great care has been taken to give the house high performance too. Passive design principles, including a sandwich-layered floor of timber and concrete, as well as highly insulated walls and an airtightness membrane.

Photo: Simon Devitt
Photo: Simon Devitt

Cardrona River House by Mason & Wales Architects

Photo: Dennis Radermacher
Photo: Dennis Radermacher

Stone, timber and glass come together in this 400m² holiday home designed by Mason & Wales Architects. The design language is very much inspired by the surrounding landscape, with views looking out over the Cardrona River, front and centre.

A sharp, sloping roofline is broken only by two large schist chimneys poking through. Viewed from the home's mostly glass frontage, they create a strong textural contrast with the jagged and asymmetrical stone leaping out from the building's otherwise crystalline face.

Photo: Dennis Radermacher
Photo: Dennis Radermacher

Remarkables House by Wyatt + Gray Architects

Photo: Blair Mckenzie
Photo: Blair Mckenzie

Halfway up the foothills of the Remarkables, on the edge of an artificial tarn sits this dramatic and playful home from Wyatt + Gray Architects. Schist-clad fins punctuate the building's front of glass, timber panelling, and stainless steel, as a small wooden jetty extends out into the centre of the mirror-like water.

The roofline is especially unique, with both sides of the house tilting down towards the centreline of the structure in a series of V formations, inspired by the mountain ranges that sit behind it.

Photo: Blair Mckenzie
Photo: Blair Mckenzie

Top banner image credit: Simon Devitt & Eliška Lewis Architects

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6 inspiring alpine homes

6 inspiring alpine homes

The alpine environment provides a stunning backdrop, but also a unique landscape for design and materials ethos too.

Words by ArchiPro Editorial Team

New Zealand's alpine regions have some of the most unique landscapes in the country: craggy rocks and endless golden tussocks, framed above by barren or snow-covered peaks.

This landscape provides a fertile ground for inspiring architectural designs, and for creating houses that sit in their surroundings in a complementary and harmonious way.

Here are six alpine houses that fit perfectly into their environments.

Brewer House by Condon Scott Architects

Photo: Simon Larkin
Photo: Simon Larkin

This 440m² Wanaka home sits nestled on the toe of a tussock-covered hill. From above, it looks as if many houses have been stitched together, with multiple roof lines and angles. But this is just part of the way the building works with the environment, rather than against it – kinking in the middle to avoid overtaking the rocky terrain in behind.

The adaptation and accommodation to the land becomes the backbone of this home’s structure, with two bedroom wings angling off the main living area. The change in shape also helped Condon Scott Architects to avoid the home being too rectangular—all the better to fit in with the jagged natural structures of the mountainous surrounds.

Photo: Simon Larkin
Photo: Simon Larkin

Stelvio, The Peak by Mason & Wales Architects

Photo: Jamie Cobel
Photo: Jamie Cobel

Whether you're outside looking at the elegant concrete, stone and black steel exterior of the building, or you're inside looking at Queenstown, Lake Wakatipu and the scenery beyond, there is no shortage of incredible views at this expansive holiday home designed by Mason & Wales Architects.

Set into the land on the highest site on Queenstown Hill, visitors can drive into the garage on the lower level of the house and enter the home through a glass door into a lobby complete with floating staircase and lift to take them to the main levels—a suitably luxurious entrance for such a magnificent home.

Photo: Jamie Cobel
Photo: Jamie Cobel

Lower Shotover House by Wyatt + Gray Architects

Photo: Marina Matthews
Photo: Marina Matthews

When the brief for a home is ‘adventurous’, you can be sure something unique will result, and that's exactly the case for this sleek home designed by Wyatt + Gray Architects. With the Shotover River as the main view from the house, and Coronet Peak looming up behind it, the beautiful nature of the surroundings called for a striking design to match.

The roofline evokes an aeroplane wing slicing through the alpine air and resting atop the glass-and-steel fronted house in an apparently gentle, almost weightless manner. Concrete walls and floors provide thermal mass that helps the home stay warm in winter and cool in summer.

Photo: Marina Matthews
Photo: Marina Matthews

Black Peak House by Eliška Lewis Architects

Photo: Simon Devitt
Photo: Simon Devitt

Height restrictions in Wanaka didn't stop Eliška Lewis Architects from building a spacious and open home with fantastic views. Sitting on a large site at the end of a quiet cul-de-sac, the house is designed to follow the sun as it treks through the sky, ensuring this home captures the sunlight almost every hour of the day.

While it undoubtedly looks stunning, great care has been taken to give the house high performance too. Passive design principles, including a sandwich-layered floor of timber and concrete, as well as highly insulated walls and an airtightness membrane.

Photo: Simon Devitt
Photo: Simon Devitt

Cardrona River House by Mason & Wales Architects

Photo: Dennis Radermacher
Photo: Dennis Radermacher

Stone, timber and glass come together in this 400m² holiday home designed by Mason & Wales Architects. The design language is very much inspired by the surrounding landscape, with views looking out over the Cardrona River, front and centre.

A sharp, sloping roofline is broken only by two large schist chimneys poking through. Viewed from the home's mostly glass frontage, they create a strong textural contrast with the jagged and asymmetrical stone leaping out from the building's otherwise crystalline face.

Photo: Dennis Radermacher
Photo: Dennis Radermacher

Remarkables House by Wyatt + Gray Architects

Photo: Blair Mckenzie
Photo: Blair Mckenzie

Halfway up the foothills of the Remarkables, on the edge of an artificial tarn sits this dramatic and playful home from Wyatt + Gray Architects. Schist-clad fins punctuate the building's front of glass, timber panelling, and stainless steel, as a small wooden jetty extends out into the centre of the mirror-like water.

The roofline is especially unique, with both sides of the house tilting down towards the centreline of the structure in a series of V formations, inspired by the mountain ranges that sit behind it.

Photo: Blair Mckenzie
Photo: Blair Mckenzie

Top banner image credit: Simon Devitt & Eliška Lewis Architects

Get in touch with
ArchiPro

Request pricing/info
Visit website
Done tagging
6 inspiring alpine homes

6 inspiring alpine homes

The alpine environment provides a stunning backdrop, but also a unique landscape for design and materials ethos too.

Words by ArchiPro Editorial Team

New Zealand's alpine regions have some of the most unique landscapes in the country: craggy rocks and endless golden tussocks, framed above by barren or snow-covered peaks.

This landscape provides a fertile ground for inspiring architectural designs, and for creating houses that sit in their surroundings in a complementary and harmonious way.

Here are six alpine houses that fit perfectly into their environments.

Brewer House by Condon Scott Architects

Photo: Simon Larkin
Photo: Simon Larkin

This 440m² Wanaka home sits nestled on the toe of a tussock-covered hill. From above, it looks as if many houses have been stitched together, with multiple roof lines and angles. But this is just part of the way the building works with the environment, rather than against it – kinking in the middle to avoid overtaking the rocky terrain in behind.

The adaptation and accommodation to the land becomes the backbone of this home’s structure, with two bedroom wings angling off the main living area. The change in shape also helped Condon Scott Architects to avoid the home being too rectangular—all the better to fit in with the jagged natural structures of the mountainous surrounds.

Photo: Simon Larkin
Photo: Simon Larkin

Stelvio, The Peak by Mason & Wales Architects

Photo: Jamie Cobel
Photo: Jamie Cobel

Whether you're outside looking at the elegant concrete, stone and black steel exterior of the building, or you're inside looking at Queenstown, Lake Wakatipu and the scenery beyond, there is no shortage of incredible views at this expansive holiday home designed by Mason & Wales Architects.

Set into the land on the highest site on Queenstown Hill, visitors can drive into the garage on the lower level of the house and enter the home through a glass door into a lobby complete with floating staircase and lift to take them to the main levels—a suitably luxurious entrance for such a magnificent home.

Photo: Jamie Cobel
Photo: Jamie Cobel

Lower Shotover House by Wyatt + Gray Architects

Photo: Marina Matthews
Photo: Marina Matthews

When the brief for a home is ‘adventurous’, you can be sure something unique will result, and that's exactly the case for this sleek home designed by Wyatt + Gray Architects. With the Shotover River as the main view from the house, and Coronet Peak looming up behind it, the beautiful nature of the surroundings called for a striking design to match.

The roofline evokes an aeroplane wing slicing through the alpine air and resting atop the glass-and-steel fronted house in an apparently gentle, almost weightless manner. Concrete walls and floors provide thermal mass that helps the home stay warm in winter and cool in summer.

Photo: Marina Matthews
Photo: Marina Matthews

Black Peak House by Eliška Lewis Architects

Photo: Simon Devitt
Photo: Simon Devitt

Height restrictions in Wanaka didn't stop Eliška Lewis Architects from building a spacious and open home with fantastic views. Sitting on a large site at the end of a quiet cul-de-sac, the house is designed to follow the sun as it treks through the sky, ensuring this home captures the sunlight almost every hour of the day.

While it undoubtedly looks stunning, great care has been taken to give the house high performance too. Passive design principles, including a sandwich-layered floor of timber and concrete, as well as highly insulated walls and an airtightness membrane.

Photo: Simon Devitt
Photo: Simon Devitt

Cardrona River House by Mason & Wales Architects

Photo: Dennis Radermacher
Photo: Dennis Radermacher

Stone, timber and glass come together in this 400m² holiday home designed by Mason & Wales Architects. The design language is very much inspired by the surrounding landscape, with views looking out over the Cardrona River, front and centre.

A sharp, sloping roofline is broken only by two large schist chimneys poking through. Viewed from the home's mostly glass frontage, they create a strong textural contrast with the jagged and asymmetrical stone leaping out from the building's otherwise crystalline face.

Photo: Dennis Radermacher
Photo: Dennis Radermacher

Remarkables House by Wyatt + Gray Architects

Photo: Blair Mckenzie
Photo: Blair Mckenzie

Halfway up the foothills of the Remarkables, on the edge of an artificial tarn sits this dramatic and playful home from Wyatt + Gray Architects. Schist-clad fins punctuate the building's front of glass, timber panelling, and stainless steel, as a small wooden jetty extends out into the centre of the mirror-like water.

The roofline is especially unique, with both sides of the house tilting down towards the centreline of the structure in a series of V formations, inspired by the mountain ranges that sit behind it.

Photo: Blair Mckenzie
Photo: Blair Mckenzie

Top banner image credit: Simon Devitt & Eliška Lewis Architects

Get in touch with
ArchiPro

Request pricing/info
Visit website
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