Making two buildings one: the seismic capabilities of Newmarket’s new mega mall

Making two buildings one: the seismic capabilities of Newmarket’s new mega mall

When two buildings are combined, the need for each structure to move independently is crucial...

Words by ArchiPro Editorial Team

When two buildings are combined, the need for each structure to move independently is crucial. We spoke to Neuchatel to find out how this was achieved in one of the Southern Hemisphere’s largest malls - Westfield Newmarket in Auckland.

Westfield Newmarket is in the final stages of completion. An $800 million project undertaken by Australian company Scentre Group, it included the redevelopment of the existing 277 mall along with the construction of a separate building, which was joined to the existing structure to create what is one of the Southern Hemisphere’s largest malls. It is also now New Zealand’s largest mall housing 230 stores, 2770 car parks, a rooftop dining area and an entertainment zone, including movie theatres.

“In structures with a significant footprint such as Westfield Newmarket, the need arises for the building to be able to move in the case of a seismic event. That need is even more crucial when two buildings have been joined, which is exactly what’s happened with Westfield Newmarket where the original 277 building has been joined to a new building at 309 Broadway,” Neuchatel’s Brian Mohan says.

“In this project, we used an innovative seismic joint system in two areas of the original 277 building, as well as in the carpark in the new building at 309 Broadway.”

 

To allow for the buildings to move independently, Neuchatel used unique aluminium sliding seismic expansion joint systems from Unison Joints. Unison’s seismic joint systems are designed to bridge the seismic gap between two elements of a building, and are available in more than 20 styles, with designer profiles which can be integrated into existing external and internal structural elements including flooring, paving, walls, ceilings and facades.

“Unison Joints differ from conventional expansion joints in that they are delivered fully assembled, and hence reduce construction time on site, as well as reduce risk of imprecise finishing,” Brian says.

 

“Because of the extensive range of joints available, there is a joint suitable for every type of floor covering. In Westfield Newmarket, we were able to integrate distinctive and seamless seismic expansion joints in areas where either side of the joint had different floor coverings, such as polished concrete on one side and tiles on the other. The ability to integrate joints in this way with different detailing on either side means the joints can be flush mounted or recessed no matter what materials saddle them on either side.”

Within the renovated building at 277 Broadway, the SiTL pan type floor-to-floor seismic coverplate system was used. “This system has a pan-shaped coverplate which allows tiles to be inlaid, minimising the visual surface to two caulked strips. Unison’s SiTL system is supplied fully assembled in a preset position to minimise site error,” Brian says. 

 

The joints used in the ramps of the new adjoining carpark building at 309 Broadway were the Unison combination Brawny-N/Aquo-P carpark EJ. “This system is specified by Westfield for rooftop carparks. It has four-way movement, and employs Unison’s Aquo-P, a 100 per cent watertight seal.” 

 

By utilising these two types of joints across the complex, Newmarket Westfield can now accommodate significant movement in a seismic event. “The joints will allow the building to move approximately 150mm at the top level,” Brian says. “This is indicative of a one-in-50-year seismic event.”

 

Find out more about Neuchatel’s range of seismic joints by Unison.

Neuchatel Construction Waterproofing

Neuchatel is NZ’s oldest waterproofing company, and one of our oldest brands, having been established over a century ago in 1905. Their qualified and experienced...

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Making two buildings one: the seismic capabilities of Newmarket’s new mega mall
Making two buildings one: the seismic capabilities of Newmarket’s new mega mall

Making two buildings one: the seismic capabilities of Newmarket’s new mega mall

When two buildings are combined, the need for each structure to move independently is crucial...

Words by ArchiPro Editorial Team

When two buildings are combined, the need for each structure to move independently is crucial. We spoke to Neuchatel to find out how this was achieved in one of the Southern Hemisphere’s largest malls - Westfield Newmarket in Auckland.

Westfield Newmarket is in the final stages of completion. An $800 million project undertaken by Australian company Scentre Group, it included the redevelopment of the existing 277 mall along with the construction of a separate building, which was joined to the existing structure to create what is one of the Southern Hemisphere’s largest malls. It is also now New Zealand’s largest mall housing 230 stores, 2770 car parks, a rooftop dining area and an entertainment zone, including movie theatres.

“In structures with a significant footprint such as Westfield Newmarket, the need arises for the building to be able to move in the case of a seismic event. That need is even more crucial when two buildings have been joined, which is exactly what’s happened with Westfield Newmarket where the original 277 building has been joined to a new building at 309 Broadway,” Neuchatel’s Brian Mohan says.

“In this project, we used an innovative seismic joint system in two areas of the original 277 building, as well as in the carpark in the new building at 309 Broadway.”

 

To allow for the buildings to move independently, Neuchatel used unique aluminium sliding seismic expansion joint systems from Unison Joints. Unison’s seismic joint systems are designed to bridge the seismic gap between two elements of a building, and are available in more than 20 styles, with designer profiles which can be integrated into existing external and internal structural elements including flooring, paving, walls, ceilings and facades.

“Unison Joints differ from conventional expansion joints in that they are delivered fully assembled, and hence reduce construction time on site, as well as reduce risk of imprecise finishing,” Brian says.

 

“Because of the extensive range of joints available, there is a joint suitable for every type of floor covering. In Westfield Newmarket, we were able to integrate distinctive and seamless seismic expansion joints in areas where either side of the joint had different floor coverings, such as polished concrete on one side and tiles on the other. The ability to integrate joints in this way with different detailing on either side means the joints can be flush mounted or recessed no matter what materials saddle them on either side.”

Within the renovated building at 277 Broadway, the SiTL pan type floor-to-floor seismic coverplate system was used. “This system has a pan-shaped coverplate which allows tiles to be inlaid, minimising the visual surface to two caulked strips. Unison’s SiTL system is supplied fully assembled in a preset position to minimise site error,” Brian says. 

 

The joints used in the ramps of the new adjoining carpark building at 309 Broadway were the Unison combination Brawny-N/Aquo-P carpark EJ. “This system is specified by Westfield for rooftop carparks. It has four-way movement, and employs Unison’s Aquo-P, a 100 per cent watertight seal.” 

 

By utilising these two types of joints across the complex, Newmarket Westfield can now accommodate significant movement in a seismic event. “The joints will allow the building to move approximately 150mm at the top level,” Brian says. “This is indicative of a one-in-50-year seismic event.”

 

Find out more about Neuchatel’s range of seismic joints by Unison.

Neuchatel Construction Waterproofing

Neuchatel is NZ’s oldest waterproofing company, and one of our oldest brands, having been established over a century ago in 1905. Their qualified and experienced...

Recommended reading
Done tagging
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Making two buildings one: the seismic capabilities of Newmarket’s new mega mall

Making two buildings one: the seismic capabilities of Newmarket’s new mega mall

When two buildings are combined, the need for each structure to move independently is crucial...

Words by ArchiPro Editorial Team

When two buildings are combined, the need for each structure to move independently is crucial. We spoke to Neuchatel to find out how this was achieved in one of the Southern Hemisphere’s largest malls - Westfield Newmarket in Auckland.

Westfield Newmarket is in the final stages of completion. An $800 million project undertaken by Australian company Scentre Group, it included the redevelopment of the existing 277 mall along with the construction of a separate building, which was joined to the existing structure to create what is one of the Southern Hemisphere’s largest malls. It is also now New Zealand’s largest mall housing 230 stores, 2770 car parks, a rooftop dining area and an entertainment zone, including movie theatres.

“In structures with a significant footprint such as Westfield Newmarket, the need arises for the building to be able to move in the case of a seismic event. That need is even more crucial when two buildings have been joined, which is exactly what’s happened with Westfield Newmarket where the original 277 building has been joined to a new building at 309 Broadway,” Neuchatel’s Brian Mohan says.

“In this project, we used an innovative seismic joint system in two areas of the original 277 building, as well as in the carpark in the new building at 309 Broadway.”

 

To allow for the buildings to move independently, Neuchatel used unique aluminium sliding seismic expansion joint systems from Unison Joints. Unison’s seismic joint systems are designed to bridge the seismic gap between two elements of a building, and are available in more than 20 styles, with designer profiles which can be integrated into existing external and internal structural elements including flooring, paving, walls, ceilings and facades.

“Unison Joints differ from conventional expansion joints in that they are delivered fully assembled, and hence reduce construction time on site, as well as reduce risk of imprecise finishing,” Brian says.

 

“Because of the extensive range of joints available, there is a joint suitable for every type of floor covering. In Westfield Newmarket, we were able to integrate distinctive and seamless seismic expansion joints in areas where either side of the joint had different floor coverings, such as polished concrete on one side and tiles on the other. The ability to integrate joints in this way with different detailing on either side means the joints can be flush mounted or recessed no matter what materials saddle them on either side.”

Within the renovated building at 277 Broadway, the SiTL pan type floor-to-floor seismic coverplate system was used. “This system has a pan-shaped coverplate which allows tiles to be inlaid, minimising the visual surface to two caulked strips. Unison’s SiTL system is supplied fully assembled in a preset position to minimise site error,” Brian says. 

 

The joints used in the ramps of the new adjoining carpark building at 309 Broadway were the Unison combination Brawny-N/Aquo-P carpark EJ. “This system is specified by Westfield for rooftop carparks. It has four-way movement, and employs Unison’s Aquo-P, a 100 per cent watertight seal.” 

 

By utilising these two types of joints across the complex, Newmarket Westfield can now accommodate significant movement in a seismic event. “The joints will allow the building to move approximately 150mm at the top level,” Brian says. “This is indicative of a one-in-50-year seismic event.”

 

Find out more about Neuchatel’s range of seismic joints by Unison.

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