Three Leading Architects (and, by the way, they are women)

Three Leading Architects (and, by the way, they are women)

If women make up around half the population, why have they had so little involvement in designing the built environment around us? Is the tide slowly turning? We discuss the role of women in architecture with three women who have all recently taken on new leadership roles at Jasmax: Sarah Hayden, Mary Henry and Roberta Johnston.

Words by ArchiPro Editorial Team

Most people would be lucky to recall one or two leading female architects. There’s Zaha (Hadid) and… um, well, you’re probably struggling already.

Those in the industry might also recall architects like Amanda Levete and Eva Jiricna from the UK, Eileen Gray from Ireland, Jeanne Gang from the US, and Brazilian architect Lina Bo Bardi.There are also numerous female architects in power duos or teams, like Kazuyo Sejima from Japan and Elizabeth Diller from the US and, in New Zealand, we have Nichola Herbst from Herbst Architects, Jane Aimer and Lindley Naismith from Scarlet Architects, Kate Rogan and Eva Nash from Rogan Nash but, sadly, they’d hardly be regarded as ‘high profile’.

On the world stage, it was recently announced that Irish architects Yvonne Farrell and Shelley McNamara, co-founders of Grafton Architects, have been named the 2020 laureates of the prestigious Pritzker Architecture Prize. Described by the jury as "pioneers in a field that has traditionally been and still is a male-dominated profession", they are only the fourth and fifth women to be named winners of the prestigious award. 

Jasmax's new leaders Roberta Johnson , Sarah Hayden and Mary Henry.
Jasmax's new leaders Roberta Johnson , Sarah Hayden and Mary Henry.

Creating diversity in architecture

The main problem for women architects is that the profession has traditionally been somewhat of ‘a boys’ club’. Ask most female architects and they’ll regale countless stories that range from discrimination to blatant sexism in the industry. Also, traditionally, for many women who are raising children, the profession can be very challenging without the support of clients and employees. It takes five years’ of study, then, to become a Registered Architect requires submitting a substantial body of work before a board to be approved. After that, architects continually have to study and collect points towards Continuing Professional Development in order to practice.

Since 2011, the organisation Architecture + Women has been working hard to raise the visibility of women in New Zealand’s architectural profession and, more recently, larger practices have been working hard to raise the profile of their female architects and to support them into more senior positions. We spoke with one of the country’s largest practices, Jasmax, about the current state of play for women working in the field of architecture.

Principal Sarah Hayden has overseen some of New Zealand’s most significant public health facilities, such as Burwood Hospital and the North Shore Elective Surgery Centre; principal Mary Henry has delivered a number of capital works projects and spatial framework plans for AUT, University of Canterbury and University of Waikato; and associate principal Roberta Johnson has helped develop Jasmax’s bicultural design identity, and held key roles on projects such as Ngā Wai Hono Engineering, Computing and Mathematical Sciences Building for AUT in Auckland and the University of Waikato Strategic Masterplan, which is resulting in a number of projects.

Mary oversaw the completion of the award-winning, innovative and sustainably-designed $56m AUT Mana Hauora building; the first major development on AUT’s South Auckland Campus.
Mary oversaw the completion of the award-winning, innovative and sustainably-designed $56m AUT Mana Hauora building; the first major development on AUT’s South Auckland Campus.

Do you think the roles of women have changed in the architectural profession?

Sarah: “In the past decade, there has been a changing demographic in the workforce and we have noticed it here at Jasmax.”

Roberta: "We are also seeing that our clients are more diverse across the board too, which is also driving change. ”

Mary: “Another shift is from the single architect or designer being attributed to a building to better acknowledging that architecture is a team effort, which requires a range of skills and diverse ways of seeing the world. We are designing for diverse communities, so our designteams must represent that."

“Diversity, in every sense, is a good thing. At Jasmax, we have gone through a lot of changes to tackle our unconscious biases and we are in a different place now than we once were – even a decade ago."

The atrium of AUT’s Mana Hauora building in Manukau  has cutting-edge sustainability features and future-proofed learning spaces. Mary won the Emerging Designer Award at Best Awards in 2017 for her work as project architect on the building.
The atrium of AUT’s Mana Hauora building in Manukau has cutting-edge sustainability features and future-proofed learning spaces. Mary won the Emerging Designer Award at Best Awards in 2017 for her work as project architect on the building.

How important are female role models and have you had many of your own?

Roberta: “We need female role models everywhere – seeing women succeed is essential for young women – if you can see it, you can be it.”

“My role model was my mum. She raised four children and was a constant inspiration – a highly creative perfectionist. I was very driven from a young age and was curious about the world, so I was lucky that my parents fed that and I had opportunities. My father also taught us a hard-working ethic.”

Mary: "My mum was a solo mum and she was very self-sufficient, working as a physio therapist while raising us on her own. She instilled in us a need for education and, like Roberta, a strong work ethic."

Roberta held key roles on the design of award-winning AUT Ngā Wai Hono building in Auckland.
Roberta held key roles on the design of award-winning AUT Ngā Wai Hono building in Auckland.

How do you achieve work-life balance when you’re a parent and an architect?

Sarah: “Basically, there is no work-life balance! Even when not 'working', architects tend to be thinking and solving design problems. We are all in this industry because we love what we do. But the real change in recent times in technology – it’s a huge enabler for workplace flexibility."

Roberta: "Employees attitudes are fundamental but Jasmax is doing well in that space. Jasmax is a flexible workplace for families, allowing staff to take time off and work part-time when they come back from parental leave. No one blinks if you have to run out and collect kids – productivity is based on what you’re achieving, rather than the number of set hours you spend in the office.”

Sarah: “We all have to remember that the way you work changes over time. Graduates tend to spend a lot of energy in the office learning on the job and, then, many architects get to a stage in life where they’re having kids and need more flexibility. Equally, they have the experience to be able to step away from the long hours, but you don't want to lose their expertise and value they offer, simply because they need to work in a different way.”

AUT Ngā Wai Hono brings together Engineering, Computer and Mathematical Sciences (ECMS) in one elegant, energy efficient structure.
AUT Ngā Wai Hono brings together Engineering, Computer and Mathematical Sciences (ECMS) in one elegant, energy efficient structure.

What does this shift in culture look like?

Mary: Millennials have come into companies with a different attitude and expectations. It’s much more about a two-way street with employers and there is a desire to align with a company that shares your values. Younger architects are more clued up about diversity, so, to attract and keep talent, companies have to align with that.”

Roberta: “With respect to encouraging more women into fields like architecture, and more opportunities becoming available to them, it’s about critical mass. Business is changing and people are trying to be more transparent in the way work is being won.”

Sarah: “That said, developing buildings is a complex process and it takes a huge amount of trust to deliver a project.”

Mary: “Yes, building your networks and contacts is very important because projects can take years to complete – it’s so much easier to work with a team you trust and who work well together.”

“It’s also important for women to put themselves out there in the building industry. When I first started attending industry networking events, they were made up of about 95 per cent men and, although I was welcome, it felt tricky to navigate.”

Roberta: Cross fertilisation is really important. Jasmax as a business is championing gender and cultural diversity with people from all around the world bringing different perspectives on a variety of projects, including the New Zealand pavilion at the 2020 World Expo in Dubai, the University of Waikato Tauranga Campus and City Rail Link (CRL).”

“CRL is an interesting example of the step change in the role of cultural design in the builtenvironment. And we won the World Architecture Festival Award WAFX prize for Cultural Identity in 2019 for the station design concepts. This could have been seen entirely as a transport project, about moving people efficiently from A to B, instead we have been able to elevate it beyond that, to what may be New Zealand’s biggest public art project. Design excellence flows from celebrating a diversity of voices and perspectives."

Sarah: “It’s amazing to look back at how much has changed over the 20 years that I’ve been at Jasmax – it’s huge! Back when I started, I could never have imagined being a principal, let alone my recent appointment to Jasmax’s Leadership team.”

Mary: “You have to check your own unconscious bias all the time. I remember when I went on parental leave – I was an associate principal – and I mentioned to Sarah that I would need to put my ambition to become a principal on hold for a few years. And she just looked at me and said, "Why?" And she was right. In the end, I was made a principal while I was on parental leave. And part of that is because of Sarah’s comment. We all have to support each other – that’s how change happens.”

Sarah was a leader on the Burwood Hospital redevelopment, which provides a clinically and financially sustainable health service to meet the future needs of Christchurch’s ageing community, with the aim of minimising recovery times and reducing waiting ti
Sarah was a leader on the Burwood Hospital redevelopment, which provides a clinically and financially sustainable health service to meet the future needs of Christchurch’s ageing community, with the aim of minimising recovery times and reducing waiting ti

Jasmax

We are Architects, Designers and Innovators We believe that great design can awaken the human spirit, providing shape to organisations, towns, cities, and cultures. We...

Recommended reading
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Three Leading Architects (and, by the way, they are women)
Three Leading Architects (and, by the way, they are women)

Three Leading Architects (and, by the way, they are women)

If women make up around half the population, why have they had so little involvement in designing the built environment around us? Is the tide slowly turning? We discuss the role of women in architecture with three women who have all recently taken on new leadership roles at Jasmax: Sarah Hayden, Mary Henry and Roberta Johnston.

Words by ArchiPro Editorial Team

Most people would be lucky to recall one or two leading female architects. There’s Zaha (Hadid) and… um, well, you’re probably struggling already.

Those in the industry might also recall architects like Amanda Levete and Eva Jiricna from the UK, Eileen Gray from Ireland, Jeanne Gang from the US, and Brazilian architect Lina Bo Bardi.There are also numerous female architects in power duos or teams, like Kazuyo Sejima from Japan and Elizabeth Diller from the US and, in New Zealand, we have Nichola Herbst from Herbst Architects, Jane Aimer and Lindley Naismith from Scarlet Architects, Kate Rogan and Eva Nash from Rogan Nash but, sadly, they’d hardly be regarded as ‘high profile’.

On the world stage, it was recently announced that Irish architects Yvonne Farrell and Shelley McNamara, co-founders of Grafton Architects, have been named the 2020 laureates of the prestigious Pritzker Architecture Prize. Described by the jury as "pioneers in a field that has traditionally been and still is a male-dominated profession", they are only the fourth and fifth women to be named winners of the prestigious award. 

Jasmax's new leaders Roberta Johnson , Sarah Hayden and Mary Henry.
Jasmax's new leaders Roberta Johnson , Sarah Hayden and Mary Henry.

Creating diversity in architecture

The main problem for women architects is that the profession has traditionally been somewhat of ‘a boys’ club’. Ask most female architects and they’ll regale countless stories that range from discrimination to blatant sexism in the industry. Also, traditionally, for many women who are raising children, the profession can be very challenging without the support of clients and employees. It takes five years’ of study, then, to become a Registered Architect requires submitting a substantial body of work before a board to be approved. After that, architects continually have to study and collect points towards Continuing Professional Development in order to practice.

Since 2011, the organisation Architecture + Women has been working hard to raise the visibility of women in New Zealand’s architectural profession and, more recently, larger practices have been working hard to raise the profile of their female architects and to support them into more senior positions. We spoke with one of the country’s largest practices, Jasmax, about the current state of play for women working in the field of architecture.

Principal Sarah Hayden has overseen some of New Zealand’s most significant public health facilities, such as Burwood Hospital and the North Shore Elective Surgery Centre; principal Mary Henry has delivered a number of capital works projects and spatial framework plans for AUT, University of Canterbury and University of Waikato; and associate principal Roberta Johnson has helped develop Jasmax’s bicultural design identity, and held key roles on projects such as Ngā Wai Hono Engineering, Computing and Mathematical Sciences Building for AUT in Auckland and the University of Waikato Strategic Masterplan, which is resulting in a number of projects.

Mary oversaw the completion of the award-winning, innovative and sustainably-designed $56m AUT Mana Hauora building; the first major development on AUT’s South Auckland Campus.
Mary oversaw the completion of the award-winning, innovative and sustainably-designed $56m AUT Mana Hauora building; the first major development on AUT’s South Auckland Campus.

Do you think the roles of women have changed in the architectural profession?

Sarah: “In the past decade, there has been a changing demographic in the workforce and we have noticed it here at Jasmax.”

Roberta: "We are also seeing that our clients are more diverse across the board too, which is also driving change. ”

Mary: “Another shift is from the single architect or designer being attributed to a building to better acknowledging that architecture is a team effort, which requires a range of skills and diverse ways of seeing the world. We are designing for diverse communities, so our designteams must represent that."

“Diversity, in every sense, is a good thing. At Jasmax, we have gone through a lot of changes to tackle our unconscious biases and we are in a different place now than we once were – even a decade ago."

The atrium of AUT’s Mana Hauora building in Manukau  has cutting-edge sustainability features and future-proofed learning spaces. Mary won the Emerging Designer Award at Best Awards in 2017 for her work as project architect on the building.
The atrium of AUT’s Mana Hauora building in Manukau has cutting-edge sustainability features and future-proofed learning spaces. Mary won the Emerging Designer Award at Best Awards in 2017 for her work as project architect on the building.

How important are female role models and have you had many of your own?

Roberta: “We need female role models everywhere – seeing women succeed is essential for young women – if you can see it, you can be it.”

“My role model was my mum. She raised four children and was a constant inspiration – a highly creative perfectionist. I was very driven from a young age and was curious about the world, so I was lucky that my parents fed that and I had opportunities. My father also taught us a hard-working ethic.”

Mary: "My mum was a solo mum and she was very self-sufficient, working as a physio therapist while raising us on her own. She instilled in us a need for education and, like Roberta, a strong work ethic."

Roberta held key roles on the design of award-winning AUT Ngā Wai Hono building in Auckland.
Roberta held key roles on the design of award-winning AUT Ngā Wai Hono building in Auckland.

How do you achieve work-life balance when you’re a parent and an architect?

Sarah: “Basically, there is no work-life balance! Even when not 'working', architects tend to be thinking and solving design problems. We are all in this industry because we love what we do. But the real change in recent times in technology – it’s a huge enabler for workplace flexibility."

Roberta: "Employees attitudes are fundamental but Jasmax is doing well in that space. Jasmax is a flexible workplace for families, allowing staff to take time off and work part-time when they come back from parental leave. No one blinks if you have to run out and collect kids – productivity is based on what you’re achieving, rather than the number of set hours you spend in the office.”

Sarah: “We all have to remember that the way you work changes over time. Graduates tend to spend a lot of energy in the office learning on the job and, then, many architects get to a stage in life where they’re having kids and need more flexibility. Equally, they have the experience to be able to step away from the long hours, but you don't want to lose their expertise and value they offer, simply because they need to work in a different way.”

AUT Ngā Wai Hono brings together Engineering, Computer and Mathematical Sciences (ECMS) in one elegant, energy efficient structure.
AUT Ngā Wai Hono brings together Engineering, Computer and Mathematical Sciences (ECMS) in one elegant, energy efficient structure.

What does this shift in culture look like?

Mary: Millennials have come into companies with a different attitude and expectations. It’s much more about a two-way street with employers and there is a desire to align with a company that shares your values. Younger architects are more clued up about diversity, so, to attract and keep talent, companies have to align with that.”

Roberta: “With respect to encouraging more women into fields like architecture, and more opportunities becoming available to them, it’s about critical mass. Business is changing and people are trying to be more transparent in the way work is being won.”

Sarah: “That said, developing buildings is a complex process and it takes a huge amount of trust to deliver a project.”

Mary: “Yes, building your networks and contacts is very important because projects can take years to complete – it’s so much easier to work with a team you trust and who work well together.”

“It’s also important for women to put themselves out there in the building industry. When I first started attending industry networking events, they were made up of about 95 per cent men and, although I was welcome, it felt tricky to navigate.”

Roberta: Cross fertilisation is really important. Jasmax as a business is championing gender and cultural diversity with people from all around the world bringing different perspectives on a variety of projects, including the New Zealand pavilion at the 2020 World Expo in Dubai, the University of Waikato Tauranga Campus and City Rail Link (CRL).”

“CRL is an interesting example of the step change in the role of cultural design in the builtenvironment. And we won the World Architecture Festival Award WAFX prize for Cultural Identity in 2019 for the station design concepts. This could have been seen entirely as a transport project, about moving people efficiently from A to B, instead we have been able to elevate it beyond that, to what may be New Zealand’s biggest public art project. Design excellence flows from celebrating a diversity of voices and perspectives."

Sarah: “It’s amazing to look back at how much has changed over the 20 years that I’ve been at Jasmax – it’s huge! Back when I started, I could never have imagined being a principal, let alone my recent appointment to Jasmax’s Leadership team.”

Mary: “You have to check your own unconscious bias all the time. I remember when I went on parental leave – I was an associate principal – and I mentioned to Sarah that I would need to put my ambition to become a principal on hold for a few years. And she just looked at me and said, "Why?" And she was right. In the end, I was made a principal while I was on parental leave. And part of that is because of Sarah’s comment. We all have to support each other – that’s how change happens.”

Sarah was a leader on the Burwood Hospital redevelopment, which provides a clinically and financially sustainable health service to meet the future needs of Christchurch’s ageing community, with the aim of minimising recovery times and reducing waiting ti
Sarah was a leader on the Burwood Hospital redevelopment, which provides a clinically and financially sustainable health service to meet the future needs of Christchurch’s ageing community, with the aim of minimising recovery times and reducing waiting ti

Jasmax

We are Architects, Designers and Innovators We believe that great design can awaken the human spirit, providing shape to organisations, towns, cities, and cultures. We...

Recommended reading
Done tagging
Full screen
Three Leading Architects (and, by the way, they are women)

Three Leading Architects (and, by the way, they are women)

If women make up around half the population, why have they had so little involvement in designing the built environment around us? Is the tide slowly turning? We discuss the role of women in architecture with three women who have all recently taken on new leadership roles at Jasmax: Sarah Hayden, Mary Henry and Roberta Johnston.

Words by ArchiPro Editorial Team

Most people would be lucky to recall one or two leading female architects. There’s Zaha (Hadid) and… um, well, you’re probably struggling already.

Those in the industry might also recall architects like Amanda Levete and Eva Jiricna from the UK, Eileen Gray from Ireland, Jeanne Gang from the US, and Brazilian architect Lina Bo Bardi.There are also numerous female architects in power duos or teams, like Kazuyo Sejima from Japan and Elizabeth Diller from the US and, in New Zealand, we have Nichola Herbst from Herbst Architects, Jane Aimer and Lindley Naismith from Scarlet Architects, Kate Rogan and Eva Nash from Rogan Nash but, sadly, they’d hardly be regarded as ‘high profile’.

On the world stage, it was recently announced that Irish architects Yvonne Farrell and Shelley McNamara, co-founders of Grafton Architects, have been named the 2020 laureates of the prestigious Pritzker Architecture Prize. Described by the jury as "pioneers in a field that has traditionally been and still is a male-dominated profession", they are only the fourth and fifth women to be named winners of the prestigious award. 

Jasmax's new leaders Roberta Johnson , Sarah Hayden and Mary Henry.
Jasmax's new leaders Roberta Johnson , Sarah Hayden and Mary Henry.

Creating diversity in architecture

The main problem for women architects is that the profession has traditionally been somewhat of ‘a boys’ club’. Ask most female architects and they’ll regale countless stories that range from discrimination to blatant sexism in the industry. Also, traditionally, for many women who are raising children, the profession can be very challenging without the support of clients and employees. It takes five years’ of study, then, to become a Registered Architect requires submitting a substantial body of work before a board to be approved. After that, architects continually have to study and collect points towards Continuing Professional Development in order to practice.

Since 2011, the organisation Architecture + Women has been working hard to raise the visibility of women in New Zealand’s architectural profession and, more recently, larger practices have been working hard to raise the profile of their female architects and to support them into more senior positions. We spoke with one of the country’s largest practices, Jasmax, about the current state of play for women working in the field of architecture.

Principal Sarah Hayden has overseen some of New Zealand’s most significant public health facilities, such as Burwood Hospital and the North Shore Elective Surgery Centre; principal Mary Henry has delivered a number of capital works projects and spatial framework plans for AUT, University of Canterbury and University of Waikato; and associate principal Roberta Johnson has helped develop Jasmax’s bicultural design identity, and held key roles on projects such as Ngā Wai Hono Engineering, Computing and Mathematical Sciences Building for AUT in Auckland and the University of Waikato Strategic Masterplan, which is resulting in a number of projects.

Mary oversaw the completion of the award-winning, innovative and sustainably-designed $56m AUT Mana Hauora building; the first major development on AUT’s South Auckland Campus.
Mary oversaw the completion of the award-winning, innovative and sustainably-designed $56m AUT Mana Hauora building; the first major development on AUT’s South Auckland Campus.

Do you think the roles of women have changed in the architectural profession?

Sarah: “In the past decade, there has been a changing demographic in the workforce and we have noticed it here at Jasmax.”

Roberta: "We are also seeing that our clients are more diverse across the board too, which is also driving change. ”

Mary: “Another shift is from the single architect or designer being attributed to a building to better acknowledging that architecture is a team effort, which requires a range of skills and diverse ways of seeing the world. We are designing for diverse communities, so our designteams must represent that."

“Diversity, in every sense, is a good thing. At Jasmax, we have gone through a lot of changes to tackle our unconscious biases and we are in a different place now than we once were – even a decade ago."

The atrium of AUT’s Mana Hauora building in Manukau  has cutting-edge sustainability features and future-proofed learning spaces. Mary won the Emerging Designer Award at Best Awards in 2017 for her work as project architect on the building.
The atrium of AUT’s Mana Hauora building in Manukau has cutting-edge sustainability features and future-proofed learning spaces. Mary won the Emerging Designer Award at Best Awards in 2017 for her work as project architect on the building.

How important are female role models and have you had many of your own?

Roberta: “We need female role models everywhere – seeing women succeed is essential for young women – if you can see it, you can be it.”

“My role model was my mum. She raised four children and was a constant inspiration – a highly creative perfectionist. I was very driven from a young age and was curious about the world, so I was lucky that my parents fed that and I had opportunities. My father also taught us a hard-working ethic.”

Mary: "My mum was a solo mum and she was very self-sufficient, working as a physio therapist while raising us on her own. She instilled in us a need for education and, like Roberta, a strong work ethic."

Roberta held key roles on the design of award-winning AUT Ngā Wai Hono building in Auckland.
Roberta held key roles on the design of award-winning AUT Ngā Wai Hono building in Auckland.

How do you achieve work-life balance when you’re a parent and an architect?

Sarah: “Basically, there is no work-life balance! Even when not 'working', architects tend to be thinking and solving design problems. We are all in this industry because we love what we do. But the real change in recent times in technology – it’s a huge enabler for workplace flexibility."

Roberta: "Employees attitudes are fundamental but Jasmax is doing well in that space. Jasmax is a flexible workplace for families, allowing staff to take time off and work part-time when they come back from parental leave. No one blinks if you have to run out and collect kids – productivity is based on what you’re achieving, rather than the number of set hours you spend in the office.”

Sarah: “We all have to remember that the way you work changes over time. Graduates tend to spend a lot of energy in the office learning on the job and, then, many architects get to a stage in life where they’re having kids and need more flexibility. Equally, they have the experience to be able to step away from the long hours, but you don't want to lose their expertise and value they offer, simply because they need to work in a different way.”

AUT Ngā Wai Hono brings together Engineering, Computer and Mathematical Sciences (ECMS) in one elegant, energy efficient structure.
AUT Ngā Wai Hono brings together Engineering, Computer and Mathematical Sciences (ECMS) in one elegant, energy efficient structure.

What does this shift in culture look like?

Mary: Millennials have come into companies with a different attitude and expectations. It’s much more about a two-way street with employers and there is a desire to align with a company that shares your values. Younger architects are more clued up about diversity, so, to attract and keep talent, companies have to align with that.”

Roberta: “With respect to encouraging more women into fields like architecture, and more opportunities becoming available to them, it’s about critical mass. Business is changing and people are trying to be more transparent in the way work is being won.”

Sarah: “That said, developing buildings is a complex process and it takes a huge amount of trust to deliver a project.”

Mary: “Yes, building your networks and contacts is very important because projects can take years to complete – it’s so much easier to work with a team you trust and who work well together.”

“It’s also important for women to put themselves out there in the building industry. When I first started attending industry networking events, they were made up of about 95 per cent men and, although I was welcome, it felt tricky to navigate.”

Roberta: Cross fertilisation is really important. Jasmax as a business is championing gender and cultural diversity with people from all around the world bringing different perspectives on a variety of projects, including the New Zealand pavilion at the 2020 World Expo in Dubai, the University of Waikato Tauranga Campus and City Rail Link (CRL).”

“CRL is an interesting example of the step change in the role of cultural design in the builtenvironment. And we won the World Architecture Festival Award WAFX prize for Cultural Identity in 2019 for the station design concepts. This could have been seen entirely as a transport project, about moving people efficiently from A to B, instead we have been able to elevate it beyond that, to what may be New Zealand’s biggest public art project. Design excellence flows from celebrating a diversity of voices and perspectives."

Sarah: “It’s amazing to look back at how much has changed over the 20 years that I’ve been at Jasmax – it’s huge! Back when I started, I could never have imagined being a principal, let alone my recent appointment to Jasmax’s Leadership team.”

Mary: “You have to check your own unconscious bias all the time. I remember when I went on parental leave – I was an associate principal – and I mentioned to Sarah that I would need to put my ambition to become a principal on hold for a few years. And she just looked at me and said, "Why?" And she was right. In the end, I was made a principal while I was on parental leave. And part of that is because of Sarah’s comment. We all have to support each other – that’s how change happens.”

Sarah was a leader on the Burwood Hospital redevelopment, which provides a clinically and financially sustainable health service to meet the future needs of Christchurch’s ageing community, with the aim of minimising recovery times and reducing waiting ti
Sarah was a leader on the Burwood Hospital redevelopment, which provides a clinically and financially sustainable health service to meet the future needs of Christchurch’s ageing community, with the aim of minimising recovery times and reducing waiting ti

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