Dressed for success

Dressed for success

Beauty is more than skin deep.

Words by Justin Foote

It’s the biggest investment of your life, so it makes sense to ensure that your house is… well, as safe as houses. New Zealand is a country of diverse landscapes and weather conditions, so the cladding you choose has to do more than just look good, it needs to stand up to these conditions.

Climatic concerns aside, the type of cladding you choose will be a result of personal preference, so let’s take a closer look at your choices. Essentially, there are five types of cladding. These are:

  • Timber—weatherboards; board and batten; shiplap etc
  • Brick
  • Stone—schist; granite; slate etc
  • Plaster/concrete—precast panels; stucco etc
  • Metal—steel in multiple finishes; aluminium; zinc; copper etc

Each of these cladding types has myriad options to choose from and to a lesser extent you can include glass/glazing as a cladding material, although it is less common as a total cladding system in residential applications.

Choices, choices: what are the pros and cons for each cladding type?

Vertical and horizontal cedar cladding used by Warkworth Construction in their Omaha V build.
Vertical and horizontal cedar cladding used by Warkworth Construction in their Omaha V build.

Timber—lightweight, abundant and available in a multitude of styles, timber is the cladding choice for many Kiwis. As a natural, renewable product, timber is recyclable and has a low production carbon footprint compared to most cladding materials. It also has a low cost per square metre making it an economical choice at the outset. Similarly, it is quite versatile, capable of being stained, oiled or painted, or any combination of these, over its lifetime. It does, however, require ongoing maintenance in order to ensure it remains in good condition, which can be quite costly depending on the size of your home. Timber is also the most flammable of the cladding types.

Brick—Another natural product, bricks are environmentally friendly and recyclable. They also offer durability and low maintenance making them one of the most cost effective choices over their lifetime. They are available in a range of sizes and colours so creating a unique look is easy. Brick does tend to be more expensive so the initial outlay is more than other cladding types and it can be quite time consuming and expensive to cover over them if you decide you no longer like the look of brick. Depending on the age of the home, it can be difficult to source bricks of the same colour if you’re renovating or extending.

Chaney & Norman Architects used stone cladding for this characterful Lake Dunstan house.
Chaney & Norman Architects used stone cladding for this characterful Lake Dunstan house.

Stone—Like bricks, stone is a low maintenance choice for cladding. It can also offer unparalleled thermal properties. While it’s unusual to see modern houses being built entirely from stone, one of its benefits is that it pairs nicely with all other cladding materials as a feature material. Stone also looks particularly good in natural settings where its use can help bed a house into the environment. The biggest negative for choosing stone as a cladding material is its expense. Also, solid stone cladding will require additional structural support due to its weight.

Plaster/concrete—Like timber, plaster is a lightweight cladding option that can take a number of finishes, which is one of the reasons why it has been a popular choice in New Zealand since the 1920s. However, like timber, it requires regular maintenance to ensure it remains in good condition. It also needs to be installed by a licensed professional. Concrete, while not a traditional cladding material has risen in popularity in recent years because of its thermal properties and its durability. Precast concrete allows for rapid construction and, like stone, pairs well with other cladding materials. Concrete, however, can be an unpredictable material and you never quite know what you’re going to get until it comes out of its precast mould so if perfection is your end goal you may not get the finish you wanted.

Metal—For most, metal cladding means corrugated iron and it is a popular choice not just for the ubiquitous utility shed. However, there are many other options when it comes to choosing metal for your cladding, especially if you’re looking to make an architectural statement. Zinc cladding in particular has revolutionised the market allowing architects to blur the boundary between roofline and walls. Also in its favour, metal is lightweight, durable and highly resilient to water damage and corrosion. However, in the case of precoated metals, they can be susceptible to chalking, colour fade and delamination over time.

Five (plus one) exceptional examples of cladding

1. Omaha V by Warkworth Construction

Beautiful clad in timber, by Warkworth Construction.
Beautiful clad in timber, by Warkworth Construction.

Horizontal and vertical cedar cladding, along with slatted cedar screens, are teamed with dark aluminium joinery on this architecturally-designed, two-storey home. Other materials include steel, glass and polished concrete. A series of set-backs in the building envelope allow for multiple outdoor areas to be seamlessly integrated into the design scheme.

2. Lake Hawea Courtyard House by Glamuzina Paterson Architects

Armoured in brick, by Glamuzina Paterson Architects.
Armoured in brick, by Glamuzina Paterson Architects.

Brick was chosen for the cladding of this house so that it would hunker down into its wild landscape at Lake Hawea. Doug Hodge Bricklaying employed a “drunken lay” pattern creating a textural palette that appears solid yet fluid at the same time, especially at night with light playing across the surface.

3. Lake Dunstan Stone House by Chaney & Norman Architects

Durable stone cladding protects this Scottish croft house by Chaney & Norman Architects.
Durable stone cladding protects this Scottish croft house by Chaney & Norman Architects.

The owners of this house located in Central Otago asked their architect to design a home based on a Scottish croft house. The building features locally quarried schist walls and reclaimed hardwood lintels. Given the exposed site, materials needed to be durable and offer window and door openings a high level of protection.

4. Clutha River Concrete House by Chaney & Norman Architects 

Cladding with a natural patina that provides a subtle textural finish, by Chaney & Norman Architects.
Cladding with a natural patina that provides a subtle textural finish, by Chaney & Norman Architects.

With durability and budget in mind, insulated precast concrete panels were specified for this riverside house at Albert Town. Known for its cold winters and hot summers, the concrete construction provides temperature moderating thermal mass, while the timber inserts provide visual interest and references the interior timber.

5. One Two B Tay by JMAC Architecture

Urban sophistication at One Two B Tay, by JMAC Architecture.
Urban sophistication at One Two B Tay, by JMAC Architecture.

Set on a small, 325m2 site, the owners and architect of this house wanted to make a statement that would become an instant urban landmark. The solution was the copper-steel-clad box—featuring a diamond shingle pattern—which confidently asserts itself to the street frontage, complementing the black finish of the other cladding materials.

6. Volcano House by RB Studio

Local is the name of the game for the cladding used by RB Studio on the Volcano House.
Local is the name of the game for the cladding used by RB Studio on the Volcano House.

Conceived as a series of volcanic boulders strewn across the site, Volcano House has been designed as a group of pavilions linked by glazed spans enclosing the main living area and acting as circulation corridors. “Carefully detailed window joinery and glazing free the roof from the floor and walls expressing a harmony between lightness and gravity,” says architect Tom Rowe.

Learn more about choosing the right cladding for your home.

Top banner image credit: Chaney & Norman Architects

ArchiPro

ArchiPro is the place where beautifully designed spaces begin

Recommended reading
Done tagging
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Dressed for success
Dressed for success

Dressed for success

Beauty is more than skin deep.

Words by Justin Foote

It’s the biggest investment of your life, so it makes sense to ensure that your house is… well, as safe as houses. New Zealand is a country of diverse landscapes and weather conditions, so the cladding you choose has to do more than just look good, it needs to stand up to these conditions.

Climatic concerns aside, the type of cladding you choose will be a result of personal preference, so let’s take a closer look at your choices. Essentially, there are five types of cladding. These are:

  • Timber—weatherboards; board and batten; shiplap etc
  • Brick
  • Stone—schist; granite; slate etc
  • Plaster/concrete—precast panels; stucco etc
  • Metal—steel in multiple finishes; aluminium; zinc; copper etc

Each of these cladding types has myriad options to choose from and to a lesser extent you can include glass/glazing as a cladding material, although it is less common as a total cladding system in residential applications.

Choices, choices: what are the pros and cons for each cladding type?

Vertical and horizontal cedar cladding used by Warkworth Construction in their Omaha V build.
Vertical and horizontal cedar cladding used by Warkworth Construction in their Omaha V build.

Timber—lightweight, abundant and available in a multitude of styles, timber is the cladding choice for many Kiwis. As a natural, renewable product, timber is recyclable and has a low production carbon footprint compared to most cladding materials. It also has a low cost per square metre making it an economical choice at the outset. Similarly, it is quite versatile, capable of being stained, oiled or painted, or any combination of these, over its lifetime. It does, however, require ongoing maintenance in order to ensure it remains in good condition, which can be quite costly depending on the size of your home. Timber is also the most flammable of the cladding types.

Brick—Another natural product, bricks are environmentally friendly and recyclable. They also offer durability and low maintenance making them one of the most cost effective choices over their lifetime. They are available in a range of sizes and colours so creating a unique look is easy. Brick does tend to be more expensive so the initial outlay is more than other cladding types and it can be quite time consuming and expensive to cover over them if you decide you no longer like the look of brick. Depending on the age of the home, it can be difficult to source bricks of the same colour if you’re renovating or extending.

Chaney & Norman Architects used stone cladding for this characterful Lake Dunstan house.
Chaney & Norman Architects used stone cladding for this characterful Lake Dunstan house.

Stone—Like bricks, stone is a low maintenance choice for cladding. It can also offer unparalleled thermal properties. While it’s unusual to see modern houses being built entirely from stone, one of its benefits is that it pairs nicely with all other cladding materials as a feature material. Stone also looks particularly good in natural settings where its use can help bed a house into the environment. The biggest negative for choosing stone as a cladding material is its expense. Also, solid stone cladding will require additional structural support due to its weight.

Plaster/concrete—Like timber, plaster is a lightweight cladding option that can take a number of finishes, which is one of the reasons why it has been a popular choice in New Zealand since the 1920s. However, like timber, it requires regular maintenance to ensure it remains in good condition. It also needs to be installed by a licensed professional. Concrete, while not a traditional cladding material has risen in popularity in recent years because of its thermal properties and its durability. Precast concrete allows for rapid construction and, like stone, pairs well with other cladding materials. Concrete, however, can be an unpredictable material and you never quite know what you’re going to get until it comes out of its precast mould so if perfection is your end goal you may not get the finish you wanted.

Metal—For most, metal cladding means corrugated iron and it is a popular choice not just for the ubiquitous utility shed. However, there are many other options when it comes to choosing metal for your cladding, especially if you’re looking to make an architectural statement. Zinc cladding in particular has revolutionised the market allowing architects to blur the boundary between roofline and walls. Also in its favour, metal is lightweight, durable and highly resilient to water damage and corrosion. However, in the case of precoated metals, they can be susceptible to chalking, colour fade and delamination over time.

Five (plus one) exceptional examples of cladding

1. Omaha V by Warkworth Construction

Beautiful clad in timber, by Warkworth Construction.
Beautiful clad in timber, by Warkworth Construction.

Horizontal and vertical cedar cladding, along with slatted cedar screens, are teamed with dark aluminium joinery on this architecturally-designed, two-storey home. Other materials include steel, glass and polished concrete. A series of set-backs in the building envelope allow for multiple outdoor areas to be seamlessly integrated into the design scheme.

2. Lake Hawea Courtyard House by Glamuzina Paterson Architects

Armoured in brick, by Glamuzina Paterson Architects.
Armoured in brick, by Glamuzina Paterson Architects.

Brick was chosen for the cladding of this house so that it would hunker down into its wild landscape at Lake Hawea. Doug Hodge Bricklaying employed a “drunken lay” pattern creating a textural palette that appears solid yet fluid at the same time, especially at night with light playing across the surface.

3. Lake Dunstan Stone House by Chaney & Norman Architects

Durable stone cladding protects this Scottish croft house by Chaney & Norman Architects.
Durable stone cladding protects this Scottish croft house by Chaney & Norman Architects.

The owners of this house located in Central Otago asked their architect to design a home based on a Scottish croft house. The building features locally quarried schist walls and reclaimed hardwood lintels. Given the exposed site, materials needed to be durable and offer window and door openings a high level of protection.

4. Clutha River Concrete House by Chaney & Norman Architects 

Cladding with a natural patina that provides a subtle textural finish, by Chaney & Norman Architects.
Cladding with a natural patina that provides a subtle textural finish, by Chaney & Norman Architects.

With durability and budget in mind, insulated precast concrete panels were specified for this riverside house at Albert Town. Known for its cold winters and hot summers, the concrete construction provides temperature moderating thermal mass, while the timber inserts provide visual interest and references the interior timber.

5. One Two B Tay by JMAC Architecture

Urban sophistication at One Two B Tay, by JMAC Architecture.
Urban sophistication at One Two B Tay, by JMAC Architecture.

Set on a small, 325m2 site, the owners and architect of this house wanted to make a statement that would become an instant urban landmark. The solution was the copper-steel-clad box—featuring a diamond shingle pattern—which confidently asserts itself to the street frontage, complementing the black finish of the other cladding materials.

6. Volcano House by RB Studio

Local is the name of the game for the cladding used by RB Studio on the Volcano House.
Local is the name of the game for the cladding used by RB Studio on the Volcano House.

Conceived as a series of volcanic boulders strewn across the site, Volcano House has been designed as a group of pavilions linked by glazed spans enclosing the main living area and acting as circulation corridors. “Carefully detailed window joinery and glazing free the roof from the floor and walls expressing a harmony between lightness and gravity,” says architect Tom Rowe.

Learn more about choosing the right cladding for your home.

Top banner image credit: Chaney & Norman Architects

ArchiPro

ArchiPro is the place where beautifully designed spaces begin

Recommended reading
Done tagging
Full screen
Dressed for success

Dressed for success

Beauty is more than skin deep.

Words by Justin Foote

It’s the biggest investment of your life, so it makes sense to ensure that your house is… well, as safe as houses. New Zealand is a country of diverse landscapes and weather conditions, so the cladding you choose has to do more than just look good, it needs to stand up to these conditions.

Climatic concerns aside, the type of cladding you choose will be a result of personal preference, so let’s take a closer look at your choices. Essentially, there are five types of cladding. These are:

  • Timber—weatherboards; board and batten; shiplap etc
  • Brick
  • Stone—schist; granite; slate etc
  • Plaster/concrete—precast panels; stucco etc
  • Metal—steel in multiple finishes; aluminium; zinc; copper etc

Each of these cladding types has myriad options to choose from and to a lesser extent you can include glass/glazing as a cladding material, although it is less common as a total cladding system in residential applications.

Choices, choices: what are the pros and cons for each cladding type?

Vertical and horizontal cedar cladding used by Warkworth Construction in their Omaha V build.
Vertical and horizontal cedar cladding used by Warkworth Construction in their Omaha V build.

Timber—lightweight, abundant and available in a multitude of styles, timber is the cladding choice for many Kiwis. As a natural, renewable product, timber is recyclable and has a low production carbon footprint compared to most cladding materials. It also has a low cost per square metre making it an economical choice at the outset. Similarly, it is quite versatile, capable of being stained, oiled or painted, or any combination of these, over its lifetime. It does, however, require ongoing maintenance in order to ensure it remains in good condition, which can be quite costly depending on the size of your home. Timber is also the most flammable of the cladding types.

Brick—Another natural product, bricks are environmentally friendly and recyclable. They also offer durability and low maintenance making them one of the most cost effective choices over their lifetime. They are available in a range of sizes and colours so creating a unique look is easy. Brick does tend to be more expensive so the initial outlay is more than other cladding types and it can be quite time consuming and expensive to cover over them if you decide you no longer like the look of brick. Depending on the age of the home, it can be difficult to source bricks of the same colour if you’re renovating or extending.

Chaney & Norman Architects used stone cladding for this characterful Lake Dunstan house.
Chaney & Norman Architects used stone cladding for this characterful Lake Dunstan house.

Stone—Like bricks, stone is a low maintenance choice for cladding. It can also offer unparalleled thermal properties. While it’s unusual to see modern houses being built entirely from stone, one of its benefits is that it pairs nicely with all other cladding materials as a feature material. Stone also looks particularly good in natural settings where its use can help bed a house into the environment. The biggest negative for choosing stone as a cladding material is its expense. Also, solid stone cladding will require additional structural support due to its weight.

Plaster/concrete—Like timber, plaster is a lightweight cladding option that can take a number of finishes, which is one of the reasons why it has been a popular choice in New Zealand since the 1920s. However, like timber, it requires regular maintenance to ensure it remains in good condition. It also needs to be installed by a licensed professional. Concrete, while not a traditional cladding material has risen in popularity in recent years because of its thermal properties and its durability. Precast concrete allows for rapid construction and, like stone, pairs well with other cladding materials. Concrete, however, can be an unpredictable material and you never quite know what you’re going to get until it comes out of its precast mould so if perfection is your end goal you may not get the finish you wanted.

Metal—For most, metal cladding means corrugated iron and it is a popular choice not just for the ubiquitous utility shed. However, there are many other options when it comes to choosing metal for your cladding, especially if you’re looking to make an architectural statement. Zinc cladding in particular has revolutionised the market allowing architects to blur the boundary between roofline and walls. Also in its favour, metal is lightweight, durable and highly resilient to water damage and corrosion. However, in the case of precoated metals, they can be susceptible to chalking, colour fade and delamination over time.

Five (plus one) exceptional examples of cladding

1. Omaha V by Warkworth Construction

Beautiful clad in timber, by Warkworth Construction.
Beautiful clad in timber, by Warkworth Construction.

Horizontal and vertical cedar cladding, along with slatted cedar screens, are teamed with dark aluminium joinery on this architecturally-designed, two-storey home. Other materials include steel, glass and polished concrete. A series of set-backs in the building envelope allow for multiple outdoor areas to be seamlessly integrated into the design scheme.

2. Lake Hawea Courtyard House by Glamuzina Paterson Architects

Armoured in brick, by Glamuzina Paterson Architects.
Armoured in brick, by Glamuzina Paterson Architects.

Brick was chosen for the cladding of this house so that it would hunker down into its wild landscape at Lake Hawea. Doug Hodge Bricklaying employed a “drunken lay” pattern creating a textural palette that appears solid yet fluid at the same time, especially at night with light playing across the surface.

3. Lake Dunstan Stone House by Chaney & Norman Architects

Durable stone cladding protects this Scottish croft house by Chaney & Norman Architects.
Durable stone cladding protects this Scottish croft house by Chaney & Norman Architects.

The owners of this house located in Central Otago asked their architect to design a home based on a Scottish croft house. The building features locally quarried schist walls and reclaimed hardwood lintels. Given the exposed site, materials needed to be durable and offer window and door openings a high level of protection.

4. Clutha River Concrete House by Chaney & Norman Architects 

Cladding with a natural patina that provides a subtle textural finish, by Chaney & Norman Architects.
Cladding with a natural patina that provides a subtle textural finish, by Chaney & Norman Architects.

With durability and budget in mind, insulated precast concrete panels were specified for this riverside house at Albert Town. Known for its cold winters and hot summers, the concrete construction provides temperature moderating thermal mass, while the timber inserts provide visual interest and references the interior timber.

5. One Two B Tay by JMAC Architecture

Urban sophistication at One Two B Tay, by JMAC Architecture.
Urban sophistication at One Two B Tay, by JMAC Architecture.

Set on a small, 325m2 site, the owners and architect of this house wanted to make a statement that would become an instant urban landmark. The solution was the copper-steel-clad box—featuring a diamond shingle pattern—which confidently asserts itself to the street frontage, complementing the black finish of the other cladding materials.

6. Volcano House by RB Studio

Local is the name of the game for the cladding used by RB Studio on the Volcano House.
Local is the name of the game for the cladding used by RB Studio on the Volcano House.

Conceived as a series of volcanic boulders strewn across the site, Volcano House has been designed as a group of pavilions linked by glazed spans enclosing the main living area and acting as circulation corridors. “Carefully detailed window joinery and glazing free the roof from the floor and walls expressing a harmony between lightness and gravity,” says architect Tom Rowe.

Learn more about choosing the right cladding for your home.

Top banner image credit: Chaney & Norman Architects

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