How to protect your timber, from inside to out

How to protect your timber, from inside to out

Local company CD50 offers a wide range of timber protection and restoration products, and ArchiPro recently asked CD50’s Stephanie Wood a couple of questions about how and when to apply timber oil to keep wood healthy, strong and looking great...

Words by ArchiPro Editorial Team

New Zealanders love using timber as part of their homes in diverse applications such as cladding, decking, panelling, or for structural or decorative solutions. With timber being increasingly specified for use in both residential and commercial buildings, it is fundamental to gain knowledge around how to protect timber that is exposed to the elements.

Local company CD50 offers a wide range of timber protection and restoration products, and ArchiPro recently asked CD50’s Stephanie Wood a couple of questions about how and when to apply timber oil to keep wood healthy, strong and looking great.

 

Firstly, why should you apply oil to timber?

Timber is greatly affected by moisture, so if it rains onto your building or decking, moisture will go into the timber and the fibres will swell, then dry out and shrink. Timber is also affected by morning dew and any type of dampness.

When moisture moves in and out of the timber constantly it causes a lot of stresses and you can end up with warping, twisting and cupping, etc. In addition, as timber is a natural material, mould, fungus and rot can occur inside the wood, which can cause unsightly stains, and eventually lead to rotting and decay.

So, to protect against moisture, you need to apply a product which does three things. One, it needs to repel moisture and coat the fibres. Two, it must remain as an oil within the timber – it can’t bind up within the timber. And, thirdly, it needs to be a safe and effective antimicrobial to protect against mould and fungus. This is what the CD50 Timber Protection Oils are designed to do.

So, what’s the problem with products that just stain or coat your timber?

If you put on a coating like a stain, it coats the timber on all sides (like a plastic bag), which does stop the moisture going in, however if the coating then gets an abrasion or breaks down under New Zealand’s harsh UV rays, you are back to square one and you are left with no protection against any moisture.

CD50’s Timber Protection Oils diffuse deep inside the timber, coating the timber’s fibres and directly controlling moisture. They carry a safe and effective antimicrobial deep into the timber.

Aesthetically, the oils vastly improve the timber’s appearance – the grain, the knots and the rich colour of the timber are all accentuated.

When is the right time to apply timber oil?

You need to wait until the timber reaches 17 per cent or less moisture content. Ideally, before construction starts, you’d apply CD50 timber oil on all sides of the timber, after making sure it’s clean and dry.

If you’re working on a renovation, make sure there’s nothing on the timber that could stop the oil penetrating in. It’s important to remove all traces of any old coatings with CD50’s Naked Stripper product and to make sure, again, that it’s perfectly clean and dry.

What is ‘bleeding out’ and does the timber need to ‘bleed out’ first before applying oil?

Different species of timber contain different natural extractives: substances or chemicals such as waxes, resins or tannins (polyphenols) that give the timber its specific characteristics. Some timbers have more extractives than others.

Moisture or water permeating through the timber can bring these tannins to the surface, causing the extractives to leach (bleed) and leave black or brownish stains on the timber or, in some cases, what’s underneath the timber, such as concrete, renders or pavers. For example, with kwila timber, the reddish colour might ‘bleed’ and stain the concrete underneath because it reacts with the alkaline nature of concrete.

Theoretically, you don’t have to wait until the timber leaches out, but if it’s a species that’s going to leach a lot, such as kwila or spotted gum, it’s best to wait a little before putting the CD50 on. If the timber does ‘bleed’, people may think it’s because of the CD50 oil washing out. However, it’s just the nature of the timber and nothing to do with the application of the oil.

 

If the timber is showing mould spots already, is it too late to apply oil?

Not at all, you can clean it with a CD50 product called SARAClean, which kills and removes mould and mould spores. If you’ve cleaned off all the mould, you might still have some black marks or staining, which can be removed with another product called DEEPClean. Quite often you do have some mould when you’re starting off so it’s important to get completely rid of it, don’t try to apply the oil on top.

 

Do different oils work better with different timber species?

The original CD50 Timber Protection Oil is ideal for weatherboards, garage or exterior doors, joinery and shingles. For hardwoods or thicker timbers, CD50 Extreme should be used, as it diffuses into the timber deeper and faster. Most of the log builders in New Zealand use the CD50 Extreme for their logs, as it penetrates deep into the logs and protects them.

 

If a client wants to colour their timber, how can that be achieved?

CD50 has many colourtones that can be applied to the timber to enhance its appearance, including light tones, blonde, gold, brown, black, even blue and green – there are lots of interesting effects that you can achieve. It’s not like paint however, it works with the timber in a beautiful way to accent the grain underneath. Make sure to always order a test pot first and try it on a piece of actual timber before you go ahead and do the whole house.

 

Do you recommend professionals apply timber oil, or can consumers do their own application?

Either – but if people do decide to apply it themselves, they often put too much on, so make sure to read the instructions carefully and apply the coats in the correct time frame. Anyone can do it though – when I built my cedar house, it only took me 24 hours to apply the CD50 oil to both sides of the timber for the entire house and garage.

If you’d like to find out more about the entire CD50 range and how to best protect your timber, check the company out on ArchiPro here.

CD50

New Zealand’s best timber protection. If you’re building a home, deck, or anything else that has a timber finish, you’re going to want to make sure it’s...

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How to protect your timber, from inside to out
How to protect your timber, from inside to out

How to protect your timber, from inside to out

Local company CD50 offers a wide range of timber protection and restoration products, and ArchiPro recently asked CD50’s Stephanie Wood a couple of questions about how and when to apply timber oil to keep wood healthy, strong and looking great...

Words by ArchiPro Editorial Team

New Zealanders love using timber as part of their homes in diverse applications such as cladding, decking, panelling, or for structural or decorative solutions. With timber being increasingly specified for use in both residential and commercial buildings, it is fundamental to gain knowledge around how to protect timber that is exposed to the elements.

Local company CD50 offers a wide range of timber protection and restoration products, and ArchiPro recently asked CD50’s Stephanie Wood a couple of questions about how and when to apply timber oil to keep wood healthy, strong and looking great.

 

Firstly, why should you apply oil to timber?

Timber is greatly affected by moisture, so if it rains onto your building or decking, moisture will go into the timber and the fibres will swell, then dry out and shrink. Timber is also affected by morning dew and any type of dampness.

When moisture moves in and out of the timber constantly it causes a lot of stresses and you can end up with warping, twisting and cupping, etc. In addition, as timber is a natural material, mould, fungus and rot can occur inside the wood, which can cause unsightly stains, and eventually lead to rotting and decay.

So, to protect against moisture, you need to apply a product which does three things. One, it needs to repel moisture and coat the fibres. Two, it must remain as an oil within the timber – it can’t bind up within the timber. And, thirdly, it needs to be a safe and effective antimicrobial to protect against mould and fungus. This is what the CD50 Timber Protection Oils are designed to do.

So, what’s the problem with products that just stain or coat your timber?

If you put on a coating like a stain, it coats the timber on all sides (like a plastic bag), which does stop the moisture going in, however if the coating then gets an abrasion or breaks down under New Zealand’s harsh UV rays, you are back to square one and you are left with no protection against any moisture.

CD50’s Timber Protection Oils diffuse deep inside the timber, coating the timber’s fibres and directly controlling moisture. They carry a safe and effective antimicrobial deep into the timber.

Aesthetically, the oils vastly improve the timber’s appearance – the grain, the knots and the rich colour of the timber are all accentuated.

When is the right time to apply timber oil?

You need to wait until the timber reaches 17 per cent or less moisture content. Ideally, before construction starts, you’d apply CD50 timber oil on all sides of the timber, after making sure it’s clean and dry.

If you’re working on a renovation, make sure there’s nothing on the timber that could stop the oil penetrating in. It’s important to remove all traces of any old coatings with CD50’s Naked Stripper product and to make sure, again, that it’s perfectly clean and dry.

What is ‘bleeding out’ and does the timber need to ‘bleed out’ first before applying oil?

Different species of timber contain different natural extractives: substances or chemicals such as waxes, resins or tannins (polyphenols) that give the timber its specific characteristics. Some timbers have more extractives than others.

Moisture or water permeating through the timber can bring these tannins to the surface, causing the extractives to leach (bleed) and leave black or brownish stains on the timber or, in some cases, what’s underneath the timber, such as concrete, renders or pavers. For example, with kwila timber, the reddish colour might ‘bleed’ and stain the concrete underneath because it reacts with the alkaline nature of concrete.

Theoretically, you don’t have to wait until the timber leaches out, but if it’s a species that’s going to leach a lot, such as kwila or spotted gum, it’s best to wait a little before putting the CD50 on. If the timber does ‘bleed’, people may think it’s because of the CD50 oil washing out. However, it’s just the nature of the timber and nothing to do with the application of the oil.

 

If the timber is showing mould spots already, is it too late to apply oil?

Not at all, you can clean it with a CD50 product called SARAClean, which kills and removes mould and mould spores. If you’ve cleaned off all the mould, you might still have some black marks or staining, which can be removed with another product called DEEPClean. Quite often you do have some mould when you’re starting off so it’s important to get completely rid of it, don’t try to apply the oil on top.

 

Do different oils work better with different timber species?

The original CD50 Timber Protection Oil is ideal for weatherboards, garage or exterior doors, joinery and shingles. For hardwoods or thicker timbers, CD50 Extreme should be used, as it diffuses into the timber deeper and faster. Most of the log builders in New Zealand use the CD50 Extreme for their logs, as it penetrates deep into the logs and protects them.

 

If a client wants to colour their timber, how can that be achieved?

CD50 has many colourtones that can be applied to the timber to enhance its appearance, including light tones, blonde, gold, brown, black, even blue and green – there are lots of interesting effects that you can achieve. It’s not like paint however, it works with the timber in a beautiful way to accent the grain underneath. Make sure to always order a test pot first and try it on a piece of actual timber before you go ahead and do the whole house.

 

Do you recommend professionals apply timber oil, or can consumers do their own application?

Either – but if people do decide to apply it themselves, they often put too much on, so make sure to read the instructions carefully and apply the coats in the correct time frame. Anyone can do it though – when I built my cedar house, it only took me 24 hours to apply the CD50 oil to both sides of the timber for the entire house and garage.

If you’d like to find out more about the entire CD50 range and how to best protect your timber, check the company out on ArchiPro here.

CD50

New Zealand’s best timber protection. If you’re building a home, deck, or anything else that has a timber finish, you’re going to want to make sure it’s...

Recommended reading
Done tagging
Full screen
How to protect your timber, from inside to out

How to protect your timber, from inside to out

Local company CD50 offers a wide range of timber protection and restoration products, and ArchiPro recently asked CD50’s Stephanie Wood a couple of questions about how and when to apply timber oil to keep wood healthy, strong and looking great...

Words by ArchiPro Editorial Team

New Zealanders love using timber as part of their homes in diverse applications such as cladding, decking, panelling, or for structural or decorative solutions. With timber being increasingly specified for use in both residential and commercial buildings, it is fundamental to gain knowledge around how to protect timber that is exposed to the elements.

Local company CD50 offers a wide range of timber protection and restoration products, and ArchiPro recently asked CD50’s Stephanie Wood a couple of questions about how and when to apply timber oil to keep wood healthy, strong and looking great.

 

Firstly, why should you apply oil to timber?

Timber is greatly affected by moisture, so if it rains onto your building or decking, moisture will go into the timber and the fibres will swell, then dry out and shrink. Timber is also affected by morning dew and any type of dampness.

When moisture moves in and out of the timber constantly it causes a lot of stresses and you can end up with warping, twisting and cupping, etc. In addition, as timber is a natural material, mould, fungus and rot can occur inside the wood, which can cause unsightly stains, and eventually lead to rotting and decay.

So, to protect against moisture, you need to apply a product which does three things. One, it needs to repel moisture and coat the fibres. Two, it must remain as an oil within the timber – it can’t bind up within the timber. And, thirdly, it needs to be a safe and effective antimicrobial to protect against mould and fungus. This is what the CD50 Timber Protection Oils are designed to do.

So, what’s the problem with products that just stain or coat your timber?

If you put on a coating like a stain, it coats the timber on all sides (like a plastic bag), which does stop the moisture going in, however if the coating then gets an abrasion or breaks down under New Zealand’s harsh UV rays, you are back to square one and you are left with no protection against any moisture.

CD50’s Timber Protection Oils diffuse deep inside the timber, coating the timber’s fibres and directly controlling moisture. They carry a safe and effective antimicrobial deep into the timber.

Aesthetically, the oils vastly improve the timber’s appearance – the grain, the knots and the rich colour of the timber are all accentuated.

When is the right time to apply timber oil?

You need to wait until the timber reaches 17 per cent or less moisture content. Ideally, before construction starts, you’d apply CD50 timber oil on all sides of the timber, after making sure it’s clean and dry.

If you’re working on a renovation, make sure there’s nothing on the timber that could stop the oil penetrating in. It’s important to remove all traces of any old coatings with CD50’s Naked Stripper product and to make sure, again, that it’s perfectly clean and dry.

What is ‘bleeding out’ and does the timber need to ‘bleed out’ first before applying oil?

Different species of timber contain different natural extractives: substances or chemicals such as waxes, resins or tannins (polyphenols) that give the timber its specific characteristics. Some timbers have more extractives than others.

Moisture or water permeating through the timber can bring these tannins to the surface, causing the extractives to leach (bleed) and leave black or brownish stains on the timber or, in some cases, what’s underneath the timber, such as concrete, renders or pavers. For example, with kwila timber, the reddish colour might ‘bleed’ and stain the concrete underneath because it reacts with the alkaline nature of concrete.

Theoretically, you don’t have to wait until the timber leaches out, but if it’s a species that’s going to leach a lot, such as kwila or spotted gum, it’s best to wait a little before putting the CD50 on. If the timber does ‘bleed’, people may think it’s because of the CD50 oil washing out. However, it’s just the nature of the timber and nothing to do with the application of the oil.

 

If the timber is showing mould spots already, is it too late to apply oil?

Not at all, you can clean it with a CD50 product called SARAClean, which kills and removes mould and mould spores. If you’ve cleaned off all the mould, you might still have some black marks or staining, which can be removed with another product called DEEPClean. Quite often you do have some mould when you’re starting off so it’s important to get completely rid of it, don’t try to apply the oil on top.

 

Do different oils work better with different timber species?

The original CD50 Timber Protection Oil is ideal for weatherboards, garage or exterior doors, joinery and shingles. For hardwoods or thicker timbers, CD50 Extreme should be used, as it diffuses into the timber deeper and faster. Most of the log builders in New Zealand use the CD50 Extreme for their logs, as it penetrates deep into the logs and protects them.

 

If a client wants to colour their timber, how can that be achieved?

CD50 has many colourtones that can be applied to the timber to enhance its appearance, including light tones, blonde, gold, brown, black, even blue and green – there are lots of interesting effects that you can achieve. It’s not like paint however, it works with the timber in a beautiful way to accent the grain underneath. Make sure to always order a test pot first and try it on a piece of actual timber before you go ahead and do the whole house.

 

Do you recommend professionals apply timber oil, or can consumers do their own application?

Either – but if people do decide to apply it themselves, they often put too much on, so make sure to read the instructions carefully and apply the coats in the correct time frame. Anyone can do it though – when I built my cedar house, it only took me 24 hours to apply the CD50 oil to both sides of the timber for the entire house and garage.

If you’d like to find out more about the entire CD50 range and how to best protect your timber, check the company out on ArchiPro here.

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