Illuminating with wood oil

Illuminating with wood oil

Natural is all the rage at the moment when it comes to colouring cladding. But what does natural mean, exactly?

Words by ArchiPro Editorial Team

“Natural means different things to different people,” Jon says. “So it’s always the first question we ask as the answer will mean going in one of two very different directions.”

To some, natural means the weathered, silvered look where timber has been allowed to age naturally. But to others, it means the natural look of the timber when it is first processed - the rich, deep colouring of the grain before it has weathered.

“If a client’s perception of natural is the first option, then the Dryden WoodOil they would choose would be a 'clear' finish that protects the timber but also allows it to silver off naturally.” Dryden WoodOil protects the timber from the elements, including moisture, and reduces cupping, warping and splitting.

“If a clear oil is not applied and the boards are left to weather naturally, after a while they will cup and warp, which is why it is recommended to use the clear oil to protect the timber and reduce maintenance over time but extending the service life of the cladding.

 

Dryden Woodoil

“We find that beach houses, properties in Central Otago, Ruapehu and around Coromandel in particular, are generally finished with a clear base and the timber is allowed to silver off naturally.”

However, if natural means retaining the rich initial colour of the wood, then colour choice is important. Often, Jon says, people are looking to retain the look of freshly sawn timber, and in these cases the colours chosen will generally be blondes, or golden reds, depending on the type of timber used.

“What the colour tone in Dryden WoodOil does is sacrifice itself rather than letting the timber weather, so in this way it acts as the UV barrier.”

Depending on the type and finish of the timber, WoodOil will last varying lengths of time before requiring a re coat.

For smooth, dressed timber you get less coverage so less colour into the wood, and if it is dark colour on dressed timber, because of heat retention, this combination means products need to be maintained more regularly.

For band-sawn timber which has a rougher finish, much more of the product and colour is able to absorb, and therefore it requires less maintenance over time and will last longer.

Dryden Woodoil

Dryden’s WoodOil was initially designed for the cedar market, but it is suitable for use on most timbers, from soft to hardwoods.

While Dryden offers an architectural range of colours that are chosen for the majority of projects, colour choice is extensive and custom colours are available.

Get in touch with Dryden on ArchiPro here to open up a world of colour possibilities for your next project.

Dryden Woodoil

Dryden

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Illuminating with wood oil

Illuminating with wood oil

Natural is all the rage at the moment when it comes to colouring cladding. But what does natural mean, exactly?

Words by ArchiPro Editorial Team

“Natural means different things to different people,” Jon says. “So it’s always the first question we ask as the answer will mean going in one of two very different directions.”

To some, natural means the weathered, silvered look where timber has been allowed to age naturally. But to others, it means the natural look of the timber when it is first processed - the rich, deep colouring of the grain before it has weathered.

“If a client’s perception of natural is the first option, then the Dryden WoodOil they would choose would be a 'clear' finish that protects the timber but also allows it to silver off naturally.” Dryden WoodOil protects the timber from the elements, including moisture, and reduces cupping, warping and splitting.

“If a clear oil is not applied and the boards are left to weather naturally, after a while they will cup and warp, which is why it is recommended to use the clear oil to protect the timber and reduce maintenance over time but extending the service life of the cladding.

 

Dryden Woodoil

“We find that beach houses, properties in Central Otago, Ruapehu and around Coromandel in particular, are generally finished with a clear base and the timber is allowed to silver off naturally.”

However, if natural means retaining the rich initial colour of the wood, then colour choice is important. Often, Jon says, people are looking to retain the look of freshly sawn timber, and in these cases the colours chosen will generally be blondes, or golden reds, depending on the type of timber used.

“What the colour tone in Dryden WoodOil does is sacrifice itself rather than letting the timber weather, so in this way it acts as the UV barrier.”

Depending on the type and finish of the timber, WoodOil will last varying lengths of time before requiring a re coat.

For smooth, dressed timber you get less coverage so less colour into the wood, and if it is dark colour on dressed timber, because of heat retention, this combination means products need to be maintained more regularly.

For band-sawn timber which has a rougher finish, much more of the product and colour is able to absorb, and therefore it requires less maintenance over time and will last longer.

Dryden Woodoil

Dryden’s WoodOil was initially designed for the cedar market, but it is suitable for use on most timbers, from soft to hardwoods.

While Dryden offers an architectural range of colours that are chosen for the majority of projects, colour choice is extensive and custom colours are available.

Get in touch with Dryden on ArchiPro here to open up a world of colour possibilities for your next project.

Dryden Woodoil

Get in touch with
Dryden

Request pricing/info
Visit website
Recommended reading
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Full screen
Illuminating with wood oil

Illuminating with wood oil

Natural is all the rage at the moment when it comes to colouring cladding. But what does natural mean, exactly?

Words by ArchiPro Editorial Team

“Natural means different things to different people,” Jon says. “So it’s always the first question we ask as the answer will mean going in one of two very different directions.”

To some, natural means the weathered, silvered look where timber has been allowed to age naturally. But to others, it means the natural look of the timber when it is first processed - the rich, deep colouring of the grain before it has weathered.

“If a client’s perception of natural is the first option, then the Dryden WoodOil they would choose would be a 'clear' finish that protects the timber but also allows it to silver off naturally.” Dryden WoodOil protects the timber from the elements, including moisture, and reduces cupping, warping and splitting.

“If a clear oil is not applied and the boards are left to weather naturally, after a while they will cup and warp, which is why it is recommended to use the clear oil to protect the timber and reduce maintenance over time but extending the service life of the cladding.

 

Dryden Woodoil

“We find that beach houses, properties in Central Otago, Ruapehu and around Coromandel in particular, are generally finished with a clear base and the timber is allowed to silver off naturally.”

However, if natural means retaining the rich initial colour of the wood, then colour choice is important. Often, Jon says, people are looking to retain the look of freshly sawn timber, and in these cases the colours chosen will generally be blondes, or golden reds, depending on the type of timber used.

“What the colour tone in Dryden WoodOil does is sacrifice itself rather than letting the timber weather, so in this way it acts as the UV barrier.”

Depending on the type and finish of the timber, WoodOil will last varying lengths of time before requiring a re coat.

For smooth, dressed timber you get less coverage so less colour into the wood, and if it is dark colour on dressed timber, because of heat retention, this combination means products need to be maintained more regularly.

For band-sawn timber which has a rougher finish, much more of the product and colour is able to absorb, and therefore it requires less maintenance over time and will last longer.

Dryden Woodoil

Dryden’s WoodOil was initially designed for the cedar market, but it is suitable for use on most timbers, from soft to hardwoods.

While Dryden offers an architectural range of colours that are chosen for the majority of projects, colour choice is extensive and custom colours are available.

Get in touch with Dryden on ArchiPro here to open up a world of colour possibilities for your next project.

Dryden Woodoil

Get in touch with
Dryden

Request pricing/info
Visit website
Done tagging
Full screen