Tanking: the ideal plan for waterproofing buildings

Planning tanking into a building's design right from the beginning of the project is a no-brainer for anyone working at the coal face of keeping buildings watertight.

Words by ArchiPro Editorial Team

When you’re working at the coal face of keeping buildings watertight, it’s no surprise that Allco’s senior technical advisor Adrian Crow wants tanking to be planned into the design right from the beginning of each project, to ensure the quality of construction is high and the building is properly waterproofed throughout its lifespan.

“Our waterproofing products can outlive the life of the building if the right membrane is used for the right job, in the right way,” explains Adrian. “Waterproofing problems are difficult and expensive to fix so it’s important that we are involved in the initial design discussions to understand the many aspects of the design and to give an accurate estimate of what’s needed. There is also an element of knowledge around cost-effectiveness and efficiency that’s required early on in the build.”

An issue that Adrian has seen many times on site is when the major contractor is very good at their job but some of the subcontractors are not so good. “This can open up a can of worms later on, because effective waterproofing is reliant on the quality of the construction,” says Adrian.

“We often see contractors try to compensate for poor workmanship with better tanking. One of my jobs is to support contractors and the other is to look after the reputation of our product. I’m keen to make people more aware of how we can help them produce a high-quality solution. We try not to be the ambulance at the bottom of the cliff.”

Allco Voltex is able to be applied to varying substrates
Allco Voltex is able to be applied to varying substrates

Adrian recommends that contractors put a process in place to ensure the tanking is properly looked after by the contractors throughout the build. “If we get everyone on board early on, then there is a lot more fluidity come construction day. We are trying to do the best for everybody, to make the right decisions from the onset.”

“Another thing to consider is that it isn’t easy to keep up with the many new products on the market, so it’s helpful to have experts give direct advice to understand the peculiarities of the project to avoid any disasters. There isn’t one product for all situations but when we work on residential and commercial projects, we try and help architects, designers and contractors specify the most-suitable membrane for the job and to make sure it’s installed properly,” says Adrian.

“There are many things to consider when determining the ideal solution to avoid water ingress and also to do what’s best for our clients’ pockets,” he suggests. “We look at the engineering and consider the materials and the construction of the floor, deck or roof that needs tanking. Is there an in-situ wall or a block wall that’s very porous? Does it have a concrete floor with block on top?”

Allco has a wide range of different waterproofing products, the most popular for tanking being the Volclay system, which is a thick geomembrane that’s based on bentonite, an absorbent aluminium silicate clay that’s formed from volcanic ash. It’s a much more natural product than bitumen-based products, derived from oil. Bentonite can swell to several times its dry volume when absorbing water, creating an excellent seal when used in tanking, and is ‘self-healing’, in that it expands to seal any small/medium punctures in the membrane.

Allco Voltex is robust, durable and self-healing
Allco Voltex is robust, durable and self-healing

The Volclay system is easy to install and can be applied in all weather conditions, even when it’s wet or damp. In some installations, it can accept foot traffic and punishment so its user friendly on construction sites. There is no waiting period after the concrete forms are removed before installing the system, which means the work can be completed sooner. It can also be installed during the winter months, when temperatures are below freezing, unlike many other membranes in the market.

A key question that needs to be considered when installing tanking into a basement foundation is ‘will it be within the water table or where hydrostatic conditions are present?’ Hydrostatic pressure is a huge problem in basements, when soil becomes saturated with water and pushes moisture through the walls and floor. Even basements in supposedly dry areas can be subjected to hydrostatic pressure, which most commonly occurs when water doesn’t drain away fast enough, due to blocked drains or during heavy or frequent rainfall.

“During winter, when the water table is at its highest, keeping water out requires a very good design,” says Adrian. “We really need to understand the condition of the water level. For example; is the inside wall vulnerable because the finished floor level is above the water control level on the outside wall?” It’s worth bearing in mind that one cubic metre of water on a wall is equivalent to one tonne of pressure per square metre, making standard damp-proof membranes unsuitable.

"It used to be that the water table was extremely high once a year, but now it is happening more often each year. While we can’t predict mother nature, we can plan what to do for when it happens.”

Click here to find out more about Allco’s wide selection of waterproofing solutions.

 

Top banner image: Central Otago House by Sumich Chapman Architects. Photograph by Simon Devitt.

Allco Voltex is fast and efficient to apply for large or small projects
Allco Voltex is fast and efficient to apply for large or small projects

Get in touch with
Allco Waterproofing Solutions

Request pricing/info
Visit website
Recommended reading
Waterproofing systems are seeing a surge in popularity in New Zealand, particularly for external decks and membrane roofing...
Bamboo requires no fertilisers or pesticides and is arguably one of the most sustainable natural building materials available today...
There is an enormous range of different types of claddings available today in various styles, colours and textures, giving designers the ability to experiment and create unique exteriors...
In a world of endless cladding colours, styles and materials, how do you choose the best options for your...
The choices for external cladding materials are almost endless, but the qualities people are after when...
What constitutes ‘eco’ in the world of cladding? Here are 4 stunning examples of sustainable solutions...
From the top of the North Island to the bottom of the South Island, New Zealand has a dramatically different...
Weathering metals evolve in a similar way to humans, ageing over the years with appearances changing as time...
In the beauty of whitewashed wood, in the industrial appeal of corten steel, and in a fusion of unseeming partners - steel and wallpaper - does the allure of large-format tiles evolve...
Done tagging
Tanking: the ideal plan for waterproofing buildings

Tanking: the ideal plan for waterproofing buildings

Planning tanking into a building's design right from the beginning of the project is a no-brainer for anyone working at the coal face of keeping buildings watertight.

Words by ArchiPro Editorial Team

When you’re working at the coal face of keeping buildings watertight, it’s no surprise that Allco’s senior technical advisor Adrian Crow wants tanking to be planned into the design right from the beginning of each project, to ensure the quality of construction is high and the building is properly waterproofed throughout its lifespan.

“Our waterproofing products can outlive the life of the building if the right membrane is used for the right job, in the right way,” explains Adrian. “Waterproofing problems are difficult and expensive to fix so it’s important that we are involved in the initial design discussions to understand the many aspects of the design and to give an accurate estimate of what’s needed. There is also an element of knowledge around cost-effectiveness and efficiency that’s required early on in the build.”

An issue that Adrian has seen many times on site is when the major contractor is very good at their job but some of the subcontractors are not so good. “This can open up a can of worms later on, because effective waterproofing is reliant on the quality of the construction,” says Adrian.

“We often see contractors try to compensate for poor workmanship with better tanking. One of my jobs is to support contractors and the other is to look after the reputation of our product. I’m keen to make people more aware of how we can help them produce a high-quality solution. We try not to be the ambulance at the bottom of the cliff.”

Allco Voltex is able to be applied to varying substrates
Allco Voltex is able to be applied to varying substrates

Adrian recommends that contractors put a process in place to ensure the tanking is properly looked after by the contractors throughout the build. “If we get everyone on board early on, then there is a lot more fluidity come construction day. We are trying to do the best for everybody, to make the right decisions from the onset.”

“Another thing to consider is that it isn’t easy to keep up with the many new products on the market, so it’s helpful to have experts give direct advice to understand the peculiarities of the project to avoid any disasters. There isn’t one product for all situations but when we work on residential and commercial projects, we try and help architects, designers and contractors specify the most-suitable membrane for the job and to make sure it’s installed properly,” says Adrian.

“There are many things to consider when determining the ideal solution to avoid water ingress and also to do what’s best for our clients’ pockets,” he suggests. “We look at the engineering and consider the materials and the construction of the floor, deck or roof that needs tanking. Is there an in-situ wall or a block wall that’s very porous? Does it have a concrete floor with block on top?”

Allco has a wide range of different waterproofing products, the most popular for tanking being the Volclay system, which is a thick geomembrane that’s based on bentonite, an absorbent aluminium silicate clay that’s formed from volcanic ash. It’s a much more natural product than bitumen-based products, derived from oil. Bentonite can swell to several times its dry volume when absorbing water, creating an excellent seal when used in tanking, and is ‘self-healing’, in that it expands to seal any small/medium punctures in the membrane.

Allco Voltex is robust, durable and self-healing
Allco Voltex is robust, durable and self-healing

The Volclay system is easy to install and can be applied in all weather conditions, even when it’s wet or damp. In some installations, it can accept foot traffic and punishment so its user friendly on construction sites. There is no waiting period after the concrete forms are removed before installing the system, which means the work can be completed sooner. It can also be installed during the winter months, when temperatures are below freezing, unlike many other membranes in the market.

A key question that needs to be considered when installing tanking into a basement foundation is ‘will it be within the water table or where hydrostatic conditions are present?’ Hydrostatic pressure is a huge problem in basements, when soil becomes saturated with water and pushes moisture through the walls and floor. Even basements in supposedly dry areas can be subjected to hydrostatic pressure, which most commonly occurs when water doesn’t drain away fast enough, due to blocked drains or during heavy or frequent rainfall.

“During winter, when the water table is at its highest, keeping water out requires a very good design,” says Adrian. “We really need to understand the condition of the water level. For example; is the inside wall vulnerable because the finished floor level is above the water control level on the outside wall?” It’s worth bearing in mind that one cubic metre of water on a wall is equivalent to one tonne of pressure per square metre, making standard damp-proof membranes unsuitable.

"It used to be that the water table was extremely high once a year, but now it is happening more often each year. While we can’t predict mother nature, we can plan what to do for when it happens.”

Click here to find out more about Allco’s wide selection of waterproofing solutions.

 

Top banner image: Central Otago House by Sumich Chapman Architects. Photograph by Simon Devitt.

Allco Voltex is fast and efficient to apply for large or small projects
Allco Voltex is fast and efficient to apply for large or small projects

Get in touch with
Allco Waterproofing Solutions

Request pricing/info
Visit website
Done tagging
Tanking: the ideal plan for waterproofing buildings

Tanking: the ideal plan for waterproofing buildings

Planning tanking into a building's design right from the beginning of the project is a no-brainer for anyone working at the coal face of keeping buildings watertight.

Words by ArchiPro Editorial Team

When you’re working at the coal face of keeping buildings watertight, it’s no surprise that Allco’s senior technical advisor Adrian Crow wants tanking to be planned into the design right from the beginning of each project, to ensure the quality of construction is high and the building is properly waterproofed throughout its lifespan.

“Our waterproofing products can outlive the life of the building if the right membrane is used for the right job, in the right way,” explains Adrian. “Waterproofing problems are difficult and expensive to fix so it’s important that we are involved in the initial design discussions to understand the many aspects of the design and to give an accurate estimate of what’s needed. There is also an element of knowledge around cost-effectiveness and efficiency that’s required early on in the build.”

An issue that Adrian has seen many times on site is when the major contractor is very good at their job but some of the subcontractors are not so good. “This can open up a can of worms later on, because effective waterproofing is reliant on the quality of the construction,” says Adrian.

“We often see contractors try to compensate for poor workmanship with better tanking. One of my jobs is to support contractors and the other is to look after the reputation of our product. I’m keen to make people more aware of how we can help them produce a high-quality solution. We try not to be the ambulance at the bottom of the cliff.”

Allco Voltex is able to be applied to varying substrates
Allco Voltex is able to be applied to varying substrates

Adrian recommends that contractors put a process in place to ensure the tanking is properly looked after by the contractors throughout the build. “If we get everyone on board early on, then there is a lot more fluidity come construction day. We are trying to do the best for everybody, to make the right decisions from the onset.”

“Another thing to consider is that it isn’t easy to keep up with the many new products on the market, so it’s helpful to have experts give direct advice to understand the peculiarities of the project to avoid any disasters. There isn’t one product for all situations but when we work on residential and commercial projects, we try and help architects, designers and contractors specify the most-suitable membrane for the job and to make sure it’s installed properly,” says Adrian.

“There are many things to consider when determining the ideal solution to avoid water ingress and also to do what’s best for our clients’ pockets,” he suggests. “We look at the engineering and consider the materials and the construction of the floor, deck or roof that needs tanking. Is there an in-situ wall or a block wall that’s very porous? Does it have a concrete floor with block on top?”

Allco has a wide range of different waterproofing products, the most popular for tanking being the Volclay system, which is a thick geomembrane that’s based on bentonite, an absorbent aluminium silicate clay that’s formed from volcanic ash. It’s a much more natural product than bitumen-based products, derived from oil. Bentonite can swell to several times its dry volume when absorbing water, creating an excellent seal when used in tanking, and is ‘self-healing’, in that it expands to seal any small/medium punctures in the membrane.

Allco Voltex is robust, durable and self-healing
Allco Voltex is robust, durable and self-healing

The Volclay system is easy to install and can be applied in all weather conditions, even when it’s wet or damp. In some installations, it can accept foot traffic and punishment so its user friendly on construction sites. There is no waiting period after the concrete forms are removed before installing the system, which means the work can be completed sooner. It can also be installed during the winter months, when temperatures are below freezing, unlike many other membranes in the market.

A key question that needs to be considered when installing tanking into a basement foundation is ‘will it be within the water table or where hydrostatic conditions are present?’ Hydrostatic pressure is a huge problem in basements, when soil becomes saturated with water and pushes moisture through the walls and floor. Even basements in supposedly dry areas can be subjected to hydrostatic pressure, which most commonly occurs when water doesn’t drain away fast enough, due to blocked drains or during heavy or frequent rainfall.

“During winter, when the water table is at its highest, keeping water out requires a very good design,” says Adrian. “We really need to understand the condition of the water level. For example; is the inside wall vulnerable because the finished floor level is above the water control level on the outside wall?” It’s worth bearing in mind that one cubic metre of water on a wall is equivalent to one tonne of pressure per square metre, making standard damp-proof membranes unsuitable.

"It used to be that the water table was extremely high once a year, but now it is happening more often each year. While we can’t predict mother nature, we can plan what to do for when it happens.”

Click here to find out more about Allco’s wide selection of waterproofing solutions.

 

Top banner image: Central Otago House by Sumich Chapman Architects. Photograph by Simon Devitt.

Allco Voltex is fast and efficient to apply for large or small projects
Allco Voltex is fast and efficient to apply for large or small projects

Get in touch with
Allco Waterproofing Solutions

Request pricing/info
Visit website
Done tagging

Tanking: the ideal plan for waterproofing buildings

Planning tanking into a building's design right from the beginning of the project is a no-brainer for anyone working at the coal face of keeping buildings watertight.

Words by ArchiPro Editorial Team

When you’re working at the coal face of keeping buildings watertight, it’s no surprise that Allco’s senior technical advisor Adrian Crow wants tanking to be planned into the design right from the beginning of each project, to ensure the quality of construction is high and the building is properly waterproofed throughout its lifespan.

“Our waterproofing products can outlive the life of the building if the right membrane is used for the right job, in the right way,” explains Adrian. “Waterproofing problems are difficult and expensive to fix so it’s important that we are involved in the initial design discussions to understand the many aspects of the design and to give an accurate estimate of what’s needed. There is also an element of knowledge around cost-effectiveness and efficiency that’s required early on in the build.”

An issue that Adrian has seen many times on site is when the major contractor is very good at their job but some of the subcontractors are not so good. “This can open up a can of worms later on, because effective waterproofing is reliant on the quality of the construction,” says Adrian.

“We often see contractors try to compensate for poor workmanship with better tanking. One of my jobs is to support contractors and the other is to look after the reputation of our product. I’m keen to make people more aware of how we can help them produce a high-quality solution. We try not to be the ambulance at the bottom of the cliff.”

Allco Voltex is able to be applied to varying substrates
Allco Voltex is able to be applied to varying substrates

Adrian recommends that contractors put a process in place to ensure the tanking is properly looked after by the contractors throughout the build. “If we get everyone on board early on, then there is a lot more fluidity come construction day. We are trying to do the best for everybody, to make the right decisions from the onset.”

“Another thing to consider is that it isn’t easy to keep up with the many new products on the market, so it’s helpful to have experts give direct advice to understand the peculiarities of the project to avoid any disasters. There isn’t one product for all situations but when we work on residential and commercial projects, we try and help architects, designers and contractors specify the most-suitable membrane for the job and to make sure it’s installed properly,” says Adrian.

“There are many things to consider when determining the ideal solution to avoid water ingress and also to do what’s best for our clients’ pockets,” he suggests. “We look at the engineering and consider the materials and the construction of the floor, deck or roof that needs tanking. Is there an in-situ wall or a block wall that’s very porous? Does it have a concrete floor with block on top?”

Allco has a wide range of different waterproofing products, the most popular for tanking being the Volclay system, which is a thick geomembrane that’s based on bentonite, an absorbent aluminium silicate clay that’s formed from volcanic ash. It’s a much more natural product than bitumen-based products, derived from oil. Bentonite can swell to several times its dry volume when absorbing water, creating an excellent seal when used in tanking, and is ‘self-healing’, in that it expands to seal any small/medium punctures in the membrane.

Allco Voltex is robust, durable and self-healing
Allco Voltex is robust, durable and self-healing

The Volclay system is easy to install and can be applied in all weather conditions, even when it’s wet or damp. In some installations, it can accept foot traffic and punishment so its user friendly on construction sites. There is no waiting period after the concrete forms are removed before installing the system, which means the work can be completed sooner. It can also be installed during the winter months, when temperatures are below freezing, unlike many other membranes in the market.

A key question that needs to be considered when installing tanking into a basement foundation is ‘will it be within the water table or where hydrostatic conditions are present?’ Hydrostatic pressure is a huge problem in basements, when soil becomes saturated with water and pushes moisture through the walls and floor. Even basements in supposedly dry areas can be subjected to hydrostatic pressure, which most commonly occurs when water doesn’t drain away fast enough, due to blocked drains or during heavy or frequent rainfall.

“During winter, when the water table is at its highest, keeping water out requires a very good design,” says Adrian. “We really need to understand the condition of the water level. For example; is the inside wall vulnerable because the finished floor level is above the water control level on the outside wall?” It’s worth bearing in mind that one cubic metre of water on a wall is equivalent to one tonne of pressure per square metre, making standard damp-proof membranes unsuitable.

"It used to be that the water table was extremely high once a year, but now it is happening more often each year. While we can’t predict mother nature, we can plan what to do for when it happens.”

Click here to find out more about Allco’s wide selection of waterproofing solutions.

 

Top banner image: Central Otago House by Sumich Chapman Architects. Photograph by Simon Devitt.

Allco Voltex is fast and efficient to apply for large or small projects
Allco Voltex is fast and efficient to apply for large or small projects

Get in touch with
Allco Waterproofing Solutions

Request pricing/info
Visit website
Recommended reading
Waterproofing systems are seeing a surge in popularity in New Zealand, particularly for external decks and membrane roofing...
Bamboo requires no fertilisers or pesticides and is arguably one of the most sustainable natural building materials available today...
There is an enormous range of different types of claddings available today in various styles, colours and textures, giving designers the ability to experiment and create unique exteriors...
In a world of endless cladding colours, styles and materials, how do you choose the best options for your...
The choices for external cladding materials are almost endless, but the qualities people are after when...
What constitutes ‘eco’ in the world of cladding? Here are 4 stunning examples of sustainable solutions...
From the top of the North Island to the bottom of the South Island, New Zealand has a dramatically different...
Weathering metals evolve in a similar way to humans, ageing over the years with appearances changing as time...
In the beauty of whitewashed wood, in the industrial appeal of corten steel, and in a fusion of unseeming partners - steel and wallpaper - does the allure of large-format tiles evolve...
Done tagging
Tanking: the ideal plan for waterproofing buildings

Tanking: the ideal plan for waterproofing buildings

Planning tanking into a building's design right from the beginning of the project is a no-brainer for anyone working at the coal face of keeping buildings watertight.

Words by ArchiPro Editorial Team

When you’re working at the coal face of keeping buildings watertight, it’s no surprise that Allco’s senior technical advisor Adrian Crow wants tanking to be planned into the design right from the beginning of each project, to ensure the quality of construction is high and the building is properly waterproofed throughout its lifespan.

“Our waterproofing products can outlive the life of the building if the right membrane is used for the right job, in the right way,” explains Adrian. “Waterproofing problems are difficult and expensive to fix so it’s important that we are involved in the initial design discussions to understand the many aspects of the design and to give an accurate estimate of what’s needed. There is also an element of knowledge around cost-effectiveness and efficiency that’s required early on in the build.”

An issue that Adrian has seen many times on site is when the major contractor is very good at their job but some of the subcontractors are not so good. “This can open up a can of worms later on, because effective waterproofing is reliant on the quality of the construction,” says Adrian.

“We often see contractors try to compensate for poor workmanship with better tanking. One of my jobs is to support contractors and the other is to look after the reputation of our product. I’m keen to make people more aware of how we can help them produce a high-quality solution. We try not to be the ambulance at the bottom of the cliff.”

Allco Voltex is able to be applied to varying substrates
Allco Voltex is able to be applied to varying substrates

Adrian recommends that contractors put a process in place to ensure the tanking is properly looked after by the contractors throughout the build. “If we get everyone on board early on, then there is a lot more fluidity come construction day. We are trying to do the best for everybody, to make the right decisions from the onset.”

“Another thing to consider is that it isn’t easy to keep up with the many new products on the market, so it’s helpful to have experts give direct advice to understand the peculiarities of the project to avoid any disasters. There isn’t one product for all situations but when we work on residential and commercial projects, we try and help architects, designers and contractors specify the most-suitable membrane for the job and to make sure it’s installed properly,” says Adrian.

“There are many things to consider when determining the ideal solution to avoid water ingress and also to do what’s best for our clients’ pockets,” he suggests. “We look at the engineering and consider the materials and the construction of the floor, deck or roof that needs tanking. Is there an in-situ wall or a block wall that’s very porous? Does it have a concrete floor with block on top?”

Allco has a wide range of different waterproofing products, the most popular for tanking being the Volclay system, which is a thick geomembrane that’s based on bentonite, an absorbent aluminium silicate clay that’s formed from volcanic ash. It’s a much more natural product than bitumen-based products, derived from oil. Bentonite can swell to several times its dry volume when absorbing water, creating an excellent seal when used in tanking, and is ‘self-healing’, in that it expands to seal any small/medium punctures in the membrane.

Allco Voltex is robust, durable and self-healing
Allco Voltex is robust, durable and self-healing

The Volclay system is easy to install and can be applied in all weather conditions, even when it’s wet or damp. In some installations, it can accept foot traffic and punishment so its user friendly on construction sites. There is no waiting period after the concrete forms are removed before installing the system, which means the work can be completed sooner. It can also be installed during the winter months, when temperatures are below freezing, unlike many other membranes in the market.

A key question that needs to be considered when installing tanking into a basement foundation is ‘will it be within the water table or where hydrostatic conditions are present?’ Hydrostatic pressure is a huge problem in basements, when soil becomes saturated with water and pushes moisture through the walls and floor. Even basements in supposedly dry areas can be subjected to hydrostatic pressure, which most commonly occurs when water doesn’t drain away fast enough, due to blocked drains or during heavy or frequent rainfall.

“During winter, when the water table is at its highest, keeping water out requires a very good design,” says Adrian. “We really need to understand the condition of the water level. For example; is the inside wall vulnerable because the finished floor level is above the water control level on the outside wall?” It’s worth bearing in mind that one cubic metre of water on a wall is equivalent to one tonne of pressure per square metre, making standard damp-proof membranes unsuitable.

"It used to be that the water table was extremely high once a year, but now it is happening more often each year. While we can’t predict mother nature, we can plan what to do for when it happens.”

Click here to find out more about Allco’s wide selection of waterproofing solutions.

 

Top banner image: Central Otago House by Sumich Chapman Architects. Photograph by Simon Devitt.

Allco Voltex is fast and efficient to apply for large or small projects
Allco Voltex is fast and efficient to apply for large or small projects

Get in touch with
Allco Waterproofing Solutions

Request pricing/info
Visit website
Done tagging
Tanking: the ideal plan for waterproofing buildings

Tanking: the ideal plan for waterproofing buildings

Planning tanking into a building's design right from the beginning of the project is a no-brainer for anyone working at the coal face of keeping buildings watertight.

Words by ArchiPro Editorial Team

When you’re working at the coal face of keeping buildings watertight, it’s no surprise that Allco’s senior technical advisor Adrian Crow wants tanking to be planned into the design right from the beginning of each project, to ensure the quality of construction is high and the building is properly waterproofed throughout its lifespan.

“Our waterproofing products can outlive the life of the building if the right membrane is used for the right job, in the right way,” explains Adrian. “Waterproofing problems are difficult and expensive to fix so it’s important that we are involved in the initial design discussions to understand the many aspects of the design and to give an accurate estimate of what’s needed. There is also an element of knowledge around cost-effectiveness and efficiency that’s required early on in the build.”

An issue that Adrian has seen many times on site is when the major contractor is very good at their job but some of the subcontractors are not so good. “This can open up a can of worms later on, because effective waterproofing is reliant on the quality of the construction,” says Adrian.

“We often see contractors try to compensate for poor workmanship with better tanking. One of my jobs is to support contractors and the other is to look after the reputation of our product. I’m keen to make people more aware of how we can help them produce a high-quality solution. We try not to be the ambulance at the bottom of the cliff.”

Allco Voltex is able to be applied to varying substrates
Allco Voltex is able to be applied to varying substrates

Adrian recommends that contractors put a process in place to ensure the tanking is properly looked after by the contractors throughout the build. “If we get everyone on board early on, then there is a lot more fluidity come construction day. We are trying to do the best for everybody, to make the right decisions from the onset.”

“Another thing to consider is that it isn’t easy to keep up with the many new products on the market, so it’s helpful to have experts give direct advice to understand the peculiarities of the project to avoid any disasters. There isn’t one product for all situations but when we work on residential and commercial projects, we try and help architects, designers and contractors specify the most-suitable membrane for the job and to make sure it’s installed properly,” says Adrian.

“There are many things to consider when determining the ideal solution to avoid water ingress and also to do what’s best for our clients’ pockets,” he suggests. “We look at the engineering and consider the materials and the construction of the floor, deck or roof that needs tanking. Is there an in-situ wall or a block wall that’s very porous? Does it have a concrete floor with block on top?”

Allco has a wide range of different waterproofing products, the most popular for tanking being the Volclay system, which is a thick geomembrane that’s based on bentonite, an absorbent aluminium silicate clay that’s formed from volcanic ash. It’s a much more natural product than bitumen-based products, derived from oil. Bentonite can swell to several times its dry volume when absorbing water, creating an excellent seal when used in tanking, and is ‘self-healing’, in that it expands to seal any small/medium punctures in the membrane.

Allco Voltex is robust, durable and self-healing
Allco Voltex is robust, durable and self-healing

The Volclay system is easy to install and can be applied in all weather conditions, even when it’s wet or damp. In some installations, it can accept foot traffic and punishment so its user friendly on construction sites. There is no waiting period after the concrete forms are removed before installing the system, which means the work can be completed sooner. It can also be installed during the winter months, when temperatures are below freezing, unlike many other membranes in the market.

A key question that needs to be considered when installing tanking into a basement foundation is ‘will it be within the water table or where hydrostatic conditions are present?’ Hydrostatic pressure is a huge problem in basements, when soil becomes saturated with water and pushes moisture through the walls and floor. Even basements in supposedly dry areas can be subjected to hydrostatic pressure, which most commonly occurs when water doesn’t drain away fast enough, due to blocked drains or during heavy or frequent rainfall.

“During winter, when the water table is at its highest, keeping water out requires a very good design,” says Adrian. “We really need to understand the condition of the water level. For example; is the inside wall vulnerable because the finished floor level is above the water control level on the outside wall?” It’s worth bearing in mind that one cubic metre of water on a wall is equivalent to one tonne of pressure per square metre, making standard damp-proof membranes unsuitable.

"It used to be that the water table was extremely high once a year, but now it is happening more often each year. While we can’t predict mother nature, we can plan what to do for when it happens.”

Click here to find out more about Allco’s wide selection of waterproofing solutions.

 

Top banner image: Central Otago House by Sumich Chapman Architects. Photograph by Simon Devitt.

Allco Voltex is fast and efficient to apply for large or small projects
Allco Voltex is fast and efficient to apply for large or small projects

Get in touch with
Allco Waterproofing Solutions

Request pricing/info
Visit website
Done tagging

Tanking: the ideal plan for waterproofing buildings

Planning tanking into a building's design right from the beginning of the project is a no-brainer for anyone working at the coal face of keeping buildings watertight.

Words by ArchiPro Editorial Team

When you’re working at the coal face of keeping buildings watertight, it’s no surprise that Allco’s senior technical advisor Adrian Crow wants tanking to be planned into the design right from the beginning of each project, to ensure the quality of construction is high and the building is properly waterproofed throughout its lifespan.

“Our waterproofing products can outlive the life of the building if the right membrane is used for the right job, in the right way,” explains Adrian. “Waterproofing problems are difficult and expensive to fix so it’s important that we are involved in the initial design discussions to understand the many aspects of the design and to give an accurate estimate of what’s needed. There is also an element of knowledge around cost-effectiveness and efficiency that’s required early on in the build.”

An issue that Adrian has seen many times on site is when the major contractor is very good at their job but some of the subcontractors are not so good. “This can open up a can of worms later on, because effective waterproofing is reliant on the quality of the construction,” says Adrian.

“We often see contractors try to compensate for poor workmanship with better tanking. One of my jobs is to support contractors and the other is to look after the reputation of our product. I’m keen to make people more aware of how we can help them produce a high-quality solution. We try not to be the ambulance at the bottom of the cliff.”

Allco Voltex is able to be applied to varying substrates
Allco Voltex is able to be applied to varying substrates

Adrian recommends that contractors put a process in place to ensure the tanking is properly looked after by the contractors throughout the build. “If we get everyone on board early on, then there is a lot more fluidity come construction day. We are trying to do the best for everybody, to make the right decisions from the onset.”

“Another thing to consider is that it isn’t easy to keep up with the many new products on the market, so it’s helpful to have experts give direct advice to understand the peculiarities of the project to avoid any disasters. There isn’t one product for all situations but when we work on residential and commercial projects, we try and help architects, designers and contractors specify the most-suitable membrane for the job and to make sure it’s installed properly,” says Adrian.

“There are many things to consider when determining the ideal solution to avoid water ingress and also to do what’s best for our clients’ pockets,” he suggests. “We look at the engineering and consider the materials and the construction of the floor, deck or roof that needs tanking. Is there an in-situ wall or a block wall that’s very porous? Does it have a concrete floor with block on top?”

Allco has a wide range of different waterproofing products, the most popular for tanking being the Volclay system, which is a thick geomembrane that’s based on bentonite, an absorbent aluminium silicate clay that’s formed from volcanic ash. It’s a much more natural product than bitumen-based products, derived from oil. Bentonite can swell to several times its dry volume when absorbing water, creating an excellent seal when used in tanking, and is ‘self-healing’, in that it expands to seal any small/medium punctures in the membrane.

Allco Voltex is robust, durable and self-healing
Allco Voltex is robust, durable and self-healing

The Volclay system is easy to install and can be applied in all weather conditions, even when it’s wet or damp. In some installations, it can accept foot traffic and punishment so its user friendly on construction sites. There is no waiting period after the concrete forms are removed before installing the system, which means the work can be completed sooner. It can also be installed during the winter months, when temperatures are below freezing, unlike many other membranes in the market.

A key question that needs to be considered when installing tanking into a basement foundation is ‘will it be within the water table or where hydrostatic conditions are present?’ Hydrostatic pressure is a huge problem in basements, when soil becomes saturated with water and pushes moisture through the walls and floor. Even basements in supposedly dry areas can be subjected to hydrostatic pressure, which most commonly occurs when water doesn’t drain away fast enough, due to blocked drains or during heavy or frequent rainfall.

“During winter, when the water table is at its highest, keeping water out requires a very good design,” says Adrian. “We really need to understand the condition of the water level. For example; is the inside wall vulnerable because the finished floor level is above the water control level on the outside wall?” It’s worth bearing in mind that one cubic metre of water on a wall is equivalent to one tonne of pressure per square metre, making standard damp-proof membranes unsuitable.

"It used to be that the water table was extremely high once a year, but now it is happening more often each year. While we can’t predict mother nature, we can plan what to do for when it happens.”

Click here to find out more about Allco’s wide selection of waterproofing solutions.

 

Top banner image: Central Otago House by Sumich Chapman Architects. Photograph by Simon Devitt.

Allco Voltex is fast and efficient to apply for large or small projects
Allco Voltex is fast and efficient to apply for large or small projects

Get in touch with
Allco Waterproofing Solutions

Request pricing/info
Visit website
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Tanking: the ideal plan for waterproofing buildings

Tanking: the ideal plan for waterproofing buildings

Planning tanking into a building's design right from the beginning of the project is a no-brainer for anyone working at the coal face of keeping buildings watertight.

Words by ArchiPro Editorial Team

When you’re working at the coal face of keeping buildings watertight, it’s no surprise that Allco’s senior technical advisor Adrian Crow wants tanking to be planned into the design right from the beginning of each project, to ensure the quality of construction is high and the building is properly waterproofed throughout its lifespan.

“Our waterproofing products can outlive the life of the building if the right membrane is used for the right job, in the right way,” explains Adrian. “Waterproofing problems are difficult and expensive to fix so it’s important that we are involved in the initial design discussions to understand the many aspects of the design and to give an accurate estimate of what’s needed. There is also an element of knowledge around cost-effectiveness and efficiency that’s required early on in the build.”

An issue that Adrian has seen many times on site is when the major contractor is very good at their job but some of the subcontractors are not so good. “This can open up a can of worms later on, because effective waterproofing is reliant on the quality of the construction,” says Adrian.

“We often see contractors try to compensate for poor workmanship with better tanking. One of my jobs is to support contractors and the other is to look after the reputation of our product. I’m keen to make people more aware of how we can help them produce a high-quality solution. We try not to be the ambulance at the bottom of the cliff.”

Allco Voltex is able to be applied to varying substrates
Allco Voltex is able to be applied to varying substrates

Adrian recommends that contractors put a process in place to ensure the tanking is properly looked after by the contractors throughout the build. “If we get everyone on board early on, then there is a lot more fluidity come construction day. We are trying to do the best for everybody, to make the right decisions from the onset.”

“Another thing to consider is that it isn’t easy to keep up with the many new products on the market, so it’s helpful to have experts give direct advice to understand the peculiarities of the project to avoid any disasters. There isn’t one product for all situations but when we work on residential and commercial projects, we try and help architects, designers and contractors specify the most-suitable membrane for the job and to make sure it’s installed properly,” says Adrian.

“There are many things to consider when determining the ideal solution to avoid water ingress and also to do what’s best for our clients’ pockets,” he suggests. “We look at the engineering and consider the materials and the construction of the floor, deck or roof that needs tanking. Is there an in-situ wall or a block wall that’s very porous? Does it have a concrete floor with block on top?”

Allco has a wide range of different waterproofing products, the most popular for tanking being the Volclay system, which is a thick geomembrane that’s based on bentonite, an absorbent aluminium silicate clay that’s formed from volcanic ash. It’s a much more natural product than bitumen-based products, derived from oil. Bentonite can swell to several times its dry volume when absorbing water, creating an excellent seal when used in tanking, and is ‘self-healing’, in that it expands to seal any small/medium punctures in the membrane.

Allco Voltex is robust, durable and self-healing
Allco Voltex is robust, durable and self-healing

The Volclay system is easy to install and can be applied in all weather conditions, even when it’s wet or damp. In some installations, it can accept foot traffic and punishment so its user friendly on construction sites. There is no waiting period after the concrete forms are removed before installing the system, which means the work can be completed sooner. It can also be installed during the winter months, when temperatures are below freezing, unlike many other membranes in the market.

A key question that needs to be considered when installing tanking into a basement foundation is ‘will it be within the water table or where hydrostatic conditions are present?’ Hydrostatic pressure is a huge problem in basements, when soil becomes saturated with water and pushes moisture through the walls and floor. Even basements in supposedly dry areas can be subjected to hydrostatic pressure, which most commonly occurs when water doesn’t drain away fast enough, due to blocked drains or during heavy or frequent rainfall.

“During winter, when the water table is at its highest, keeping water out requires a very good design,” says Adrian. “We really need to understand the condition of the water level. For example; is the inside wall vulnerable because the finished floor level is above the water control level on the outside wall?” It’s worth bearing in mind that one cubic metre of water on a wall is equivalent to one tonne of pressure per square metre, making standard damp-proof membranes unsuitable.

"It used to be that the water table was extremely high once a year, but now it is happening more often each year. While we can’t predict mother nature, we can plan what to do for when it happens.”

Click here to find out more about Allco’s wide selection of waterproofing solutions.

 

Top banner image: Central Otago House by Sumich Chapman Architects. Photograph by Simon Devitt.

Allco Voltex is fast and efficient to apply for large or small projects
Allco Voltex is fast and efficient to apply for large or small projects

Get in touch with
Allco Waterproofing Solutions

Request pricing/info
Visit website
Done tagging
Tanking: the ideal plan for waterproofing buildings

Tanking: the ideal plan for waterproofing buildings

Planning tanking into a building's design right from the beginning of the project is a no-brainer for anyone working at the coal face of keeping buildings watertight.

Words by ArchiPro Editorial Team

When you’re working at the coal face of keeping buildings watertight, it’s no surprise that Allco’s senior technical advisor Adrian Crow wants tanking to be planned into the design right from the beginning of each project, to ensure the quality of construction is high and the building is properly waterproofed throughout its lifespan.

“Our waterproofing products can outlive the life of the building if the right membrane is used for the right job, in the right way,” explains Adrian. “Waterproofing problems are difficult and expensive to fix so it’s important that we are involved in the initial design discussions to understand the many aspects of the design and to give an accurate estimate of what’s needed. There is also an element of knowledge around cost-effectiveness and efficiency that’s required early on in the build.”

An issue that Adrian has seen many times on site is when the major contractor is very good at their job but some of the subcontractors are not so good. “This can open up a can of worms later on, because effective waterproofing is reliant on the quality of the construction,” says Adrian.

“We often see contractors try to compensate for poor workmanship with better tanking. One of my jobs is to support contractors and the other is to look after the reputation of our product. I’m keen to make people more aware of how we can help them produce a high-quality solution. We try not to be the ambulance at the bottom of the cliff.”

Allco Voltex is able to be applied to varying substrates
Allco Voltex is able to be applied to varying substrates

Adrian recommends that contractors put a process in place to ensure the tanking is properly looked after by the contractors throughout the build. “If we get everyone on board early on, then there is a lot more fluidity come construction day. We are trying to do the best for everybody, to make the right decisions from the onset.”

“Another thing to consider is that it isn’t easy to keep up with the many new products on the market, so it’s helpful to have experts give direct advice to understand the peculiarities of the project to avoid any disasters. There isn’t one product for all situations but when we work on residential and commercial projects, we try and help architects, designers and contractors specify the most-suitable membrane for the job and to make sure it’s installed properly,” says Adrian.

“There are many things to consider when determining the ideal solution to avoid water ingress and also to do what’s best for our clients’ pockets,” he suggests. “We look at the engineering and consider the materials and the construction of the floor, deck or roof that needs tanking. Is there an in-situ wall or a block wall that’s very porous? Does it have a concrete floor with block on top?”

Allco has a wide range of different waterproofing products, the most popular for tanking being the Volclay system, which is a thick geomembrane that’s based on bentonite, an absorbent aluminium silicate clay that’s formed from volcanic ash. It’s a much more natural product than bitumen-based products, derived from oil. Bentonite can swell to several times its dry volume when absorbing water, creating an excellent seal when used in tanking, and is ‘self-healing’, in that it expands to seal any small/medium punctures in the membrane.

Allco Voltex is robust, durable and self-healing
Allco Voltex is robust, durable and self-healing

The Volclay system is easy to install and can be applied in all weather conditions, even when it’s wet or damp. In some installations, it can accept foot traffic and punishment so its user friendly on construction sites. There is no waiting period after the concrete forms are removed before installing the system, which means the work can be completed sooner. It can also be installed during the winter months, when temperatures are below freezing, unlike many other membranes in the market.

A key question that needs to be considered when installing tanking into a basement foundation is ‘will it be within the water table or where hydrostatic conditions are present?’ Hydrostatic pressure is a huge problem in basements, when soil becomes saturated with water and pushes moisture through the walls and floor. Even basements in supposedly dry areas can be subjected to hydrostatic pressure, which most commonly occurs when water doesn’t drain away fast enough, due to blocked drains or during heavy or frequent rainfall.

“During winter, when the water table is at its highest, keeping water out requires a very good design,” says Adrian. “We really need to understand the condition of the water level. For example; is the inside wall vulnerable because the finished floor level is above the water control level on the outside wall?” It’s worth bearing in mind that one cubic metre of water on a wall is equivalent to one tonne of pressure per square metre, making standard damp-proof membranes unsuitable.

"It used to be that the water table was extremely high once a year, but now it is happening more often each year. While we can’t predict mother nature, we can plan what to do for when it happens.”

Click here to find out more about Allco’s wide selection of waterproofing solutions.

 

Top banner image: Central Otago House by Sumich Chapman Architects. Photograph by Simon Devitt.

Allco Voltex is fast and efficient to apply for large or small projects
Allco Voltex is fast and efficient to apply for large or small projects

Get in touch with
Allco Waterproofing Solutions

Request pricing/info
Visit website
Done tagging
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