Big, bold and beautiful: 5 top large-format tile designs

Big, bold and beautiful: 5 top large-format tile designs

In the beauty of whitewashed wood, in the industrial appeal of corten steel, and in a fusion of unseeming partners - steel and wallpaper - does the allure of large-format tiles evolve...

Words by ArchiPro Editorial Team

In the beauty of whitewashed wood, in the industrial appeal of corten steel, and in a fusion of unseeming partners - steel and wallpaper - does the allure of large-format tiles evolve. Here’s five of the best large-format designer tiles for the home.

Large-format tiles appeared on the design scene some years ago, and they’ve gone from strength to strength with the product now one of the most sought after styles of tile on the market. Perfect for everywhere from small spaces to expansive areas, large-format tiles are appearing in a range of striking finishes. Here’s five of the best large-format designer tiles not to miss, curated by MC Tiles’ John Ryan.

1. Corten steel-look tiles

Corten steel has seen a surge in popularity over the last few years and in large-format tiles, the material’s aesthetics fit seamlessly into a huge range of decor styles, MC Tiles’ John Ryan says. “The ultimate simplicity of this material is a real drawcard. It creates an elegant luxury and an effortless yet curated appeal. The Tube range by Imola offers an extraordinary intensity, absorbing and recreating the vibrations that make up the vital rhythms of the contemporary metropolis. The result is large format tiles that combine an underground mood with metropolitan elegance to create a sense of lived-in comfort using tiles that have a time-worn appeal and a sleek, modern feel,” John says. 

 

2. Real surfaces: wood-look tiles
The design aim for Legno Del Nataio was to create a wood surface that combined the innate elegance of the material with a real surface upon which its history is realised. “Designed by La Faenza, the result is one of the most authentic ceramic wood surfaces available. It is modeled on Teak that was found in the office of a notary public - timber that was fitted more than half a century ago. The ‘living’ wood finish is marked by the passage of time; by the people and objects it has witnessed over the years.”

3. A fusion of steel and wallpaper: the Metallo tile

Steel, a material that has evolved from being seen as a product typically used only in industrial settings to one that represents a vibrant design solution in residential settings, is fused here with the essence of wallpaper - a material most popular in the 1980s, John says. “The Metallo tile is an incredibly eclectic choice because, although steel and wallpaper are seemingly very different materials, it harmonises them, fusing them together in a new design synthesis.”

 

4. Marble-inspired ceramic tiles

Inspired by the wealth of fine marble, a collection known as The Room incorporates a grafting of traditional and current, with tiles tainted with texture. Made of full-body porcelain stoneware, these tiles are a perfect mix of Italy and the rest of the world, of warm and cold colour and of a well known yet extremely rare product. 

5. Sculptured stone tiles

In Shinlin, in the south-west of China, stands a rare wonder. An incredible expanse of tall limestone formations jut up from the ground like stalagmites in a hidden cave, as if an entire forest has suddenly turned to stone. The most famous of these is a rock called Ashima. According to local legend, Ashima was a beautiful and courageous girl born in the forest who fell in love with a boy she could not marry. Refusing to accept her fate, she tried to run away with him but was immediately turned to stone, along with the entire forest that still holds her spirit. It is this stone forest labyrinth that inspired the Ashima collection of stone-effect ceramic tiles. “In each tile, a vast range of light is refracted with surfaces that appear rough and stony with lines and furrows that seem marked by the elements and the passing of time.” Available in both light and bold tones covering beige, white and grey and black, Ashima is available in two surfaces; one for indoors and one for out.

 

Peruse more of the latest trending large-format tiles by MC Tiles. 

 

MC Tiles

MC Tiles and Distribution Ltd is a New Zealand owned and operated tile importer, retailer, and distributor. Comprised of two retail outlets, an importation division, and...

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Big, bold and beautiful: 5 top large-format tile designs

Big, bold and beautiful: 5 top large-format tile designs

In the beauty of whitewashed wood, in the industrial appeal of corten steel, and in a fusion of unseeming partners - steel and wallpaper - does the allure of large-format tiles evolve...

Words by ArchiPro Editorial Team

In the beauty of whitewashed wood, in the industrial appeal of corten steel, and in a fusion of unseeming partners - steel and wallpaper - does the allure of large-format tiles evolve. Here’s five of the best large-format designer tiles for the home.

Large-format tiles appeared on the design scene some years ago, and they’ve gone from strength to strength with the product now one of the most sought after styles of tile on the market. Perfect for everywhere from small spaces to expansive areas, large-format tiles are appearing in a range of striking finishes. Here’s five of the best large-format designer tiles not to miss, curated by MC Tiles’ John Ryan.

1. Corten steel-look tiles

Corten steel has seen a surge in popularity over the last few years and in large-format tiles, the material’s aesthetics fit seamlessly into a huge range of decor styles, MC Tiles’ John Ryan says. “The ultimate simplicity of this material is a real drawcard. It creates an elegant luxury and an effortless yet curated appeal. The Tube range by Imola offers an extraordinary intensity, absorbing and recreating the vibrations that make up the vital rhythms of the contemporary metropolis. The result is large format tiles that combine an underground mood with metropolitan elegance to create a sense of lived-in comfort using tiles that have a time-worn appeal and a sleek, modern feel,” John says. 

 

2. Real surfaces: wood-look tiles
The design aim for Legno Del Nataio was to create a wood surface that combined the innate elegance of the material with a real surface upon which its history is realised. “Designed by La Faenza, the result is one of the most authentic ceramic wood surfaces available. It is modeled on Teak that was found in the office of a notary public - timber that was fitted more than half a century ago. The ‘living’ wood finish is marked by the passage of time; by the people and objects it has witnessed over the years.”

3. A fusion of steel and wallpaper: the Metallo tile

Steel, a material that has evolved from being seen as a product typically used only in industrial settings to one that represents a vibrant design solution in residential settings, is fused here with the essence of wallpaper - a material most popular in the 1980s, John says. “The Metallo tile is an incredibly eclectic choice because, although steel and wallpaper are seemingly very different materials, it harmonises them, fusing them together in a new design synthesis.”

 

4. Marble-inspired ceramic tiles

Inspired by the wealth of fine marble, a collection known as The Room incorporates a grafting of traditional and current, with tiles tainted with texture. Made of full-body porcelain stoneware, these tiles are a perfect mix of Italy and the rest of the world, of warm and cold colour and of a well known yet extremely rare product. 

5. Sculptured stone tiles

In Shinlin, in the south-west of China, stands a rare wonder. An incredible expanse of tall limestone formations jut up from the ground like stalagmites in a hidden cave, as if an entire forest has suddenly turned to stone. The most famous of these is a rock called Ashima. According to local legend, Ashima was a beautiful and courageous girl born in the forest who fell in love with a boy she could not marry. Refusing to accept her fate, she tried to run away with him but was immediately turned to stone, along with the entire forest that still holds her spirit. It is this stone forest labyrinth that inspired the Ashima collection of stone-effect ceramic tiles. “In each tile, a vast range of light is refracted with surfaces that appear rough and stony with lines and furrows that seem marked by the elements and the passing of time.” Available in both light and bold tones covering beige, white and grey and black, Ashima is available in two surfaces; one for indoors and one for out.

 

Peruse more of the latest trending large-format tiles by MC Tiles. 

 

Get in touch with
MC Tiles

Request pricing/info
Visit website
Recommended reading
Done tagging
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Big, bold and beautiful: 5 top large-format tile designs

Big, bold and beautiful: 5 top large-format tile designs

In the beauty of whitewashed wood, in the industrial appeal of corten steel, and in a fusion of unseeming partners - steel and wallpaper - does the allure of large-format tiles evolve...

Words by ArchiPro Editorial Team

In the beauty of whitewashed wood, in the industrial appeal of corten steel, and in a fusion of unseeming partners - steel and wallpaper - does the allure of large-format tiles evolve. Here’s five of the best large-format designer tiles for the home.

Large-format tiles appeared on the design scene some years ago, and they’ve gone from strength to strength with the product now one of the most sought after styles of tile on the market. Perfect for everywhere from small spaces to expansive areas, large-format tiles are appearing in a range of striking finishes. Here’s five of the best large-format designer tiles not to miss, curated by MC Tiles’ John Ryan.

1. Corten steel-look tiles

Corten steel has seen a surge in popularity over the last few years and in large-format tiles, the material’s aesthetics fit seamlessly into a huge range of decor styles, MC Tiles’ John Ryan says. “The ultimate simplicity of this material is a real drawcard. It creates an elegant luxury and an effortless yet curated appeal. The Tube range by Imola offers an extraordinary intensity, absorbing and recreating the vibrations that make up the vital rhythms of the contemporary metropolis. The result is large format tiles that combine an underground mood with metropolitan elegance to create a sense of lived-in comfort using tiles that have a time-worn appeal and a sleek, modern feel,” John says. 

 

2. Real surfaces: wood-look tiles
The design aim for Legno Del Nataio was to create a wood surface that combined the innate elegance of the material with a real surface upon which its history is realised. “Designed by La Faenza, the result is one of the most authentic ceramic wood surfaces available. It is modeled on Teak that was found in the office of a notary public - timber that was fitted more than half a century ago. The ‘living’ wood finish is marked by the passage of time; by the people and objects it has witnessed over the years.”

3. A fusion of steel and wallpaper: the Metallo tile

Steel, a material that has evolved from being seen as a product typically used only in industrial settings to one that represents a vibrant design solution in residential settings, is fused here with the essence of wallpaper - a material most popular in the 1980s, John says. “The Metallo tile is an incredibly eclectic choice because, although steel and wallpaper are seemingly very different materials, it harmonises them, fusing them together in a new design synthesis.”

 

4. Marble-inspired ceramic tiles

Inspired by the wealth of fine marble, a collection known as The Room incorporates a grafting of traditional and current, with tiles tainted with texture. Made of full-body porcelain stoneware, these tiles are a perfect mix of Italy and the rest of the world, of warm and cold colour and of a well known yet extremely rare product. 

5. Sculptured stone tiles

In Shinlin, in the south-west of China, stands a rare wonder. An incredible expanse of tall limestone formations jut up from the ground like stalagmites in a hidden cave, as if an entire forest has suddenly turned to stone. The most famous of these is a rock called Ashima. According to local legend, Ashima was a beautiful and courageous girl born in the forest who fell in love with a boy she could not marry. Refusing to accept her fate, she tried to run away with him but was immediately turned to stone, along with the entire forest that still holds her spirit. It is this stone forest labyrinth that inspired the Ashima collection of stone-effect ceramic tiles. “In each tile, a vast range of light is refracted with surfaces that appear rough and stony with lines and furrows that seem marked by the elements and the passing of time.” Available in both light and bold tones covering beige, white and grey and black, Ashima is available in two surfaces; one for indoors and one for out.

 

Peruse more of the latest trending large-format tiles by MC Tiles. 

 

Get in touch with
MC Tiles

Request pricing/info
Visit website
Done tagging
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