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Walking around Italy, John Ryan says you can’t help but notice the massive amounts of natural stone. Using this as inspiration, the tile  industry is recreating startlingly realistic stone look tiles. And it’s not just natural stone that the tile  industry is using for inspiration; wood-look tiles are continuing to evolve and develop in popularity, as are concrete-look tiles.

In New Zealand, the tile market continues on a similar trajectory with industrial concrete, natural stone and wood-look tiles all popular product for MC Tiles, John says. “What was evident at Cersaie too was the continuing shift towards really large format ceramics. We’re definitely seeing that here too, with people using larger format tiles, particularly as features in their homes.”

Larger format and plank tiles aren’t just reserved for larger spaces though. In fact, it’s sometimes smaller spaces where these can be utilised in the most stunning ways. “Using larger format tiles in areas with limited room such as en suite bathrooms can actually make the space seem much larger than it is,” John says. “Because there are less grout lines and details, you can create these really crisp, clean spaces that are visually beautiful and really increase the feeling of space in what would otherwise be a noticeably small area.”

Walking around Italy, John Ryan says you can’t help but notice the massive amounts of natural stone. Using this as inspiration, the tile  industry is recreating startlingly realistic stone look tiles. And it’s not just natural stone that the tile  industry is using for inspiration; wood-look tiles are continuing to evolve and develop in popularity, as are concrete-look tiles.

In New Zealand, the tile market continues on a similar trajectory with industrial concrete, natural stone and wood-look tiles all popular product for MC Tiles, John says. “What was evident at Cersaie too was the continuing shift towards really large format ceramics. We’re definitely seeing that here too, with people using larger format tiles, particularly as features in their homes.”

Larger format and plank tiles aren’t just reserved for larger spaces though. In fact, it’s sometimes smaller spaces where these can be utilised in the most stunning ways. “Using larger format tiles in areas with limited room such as en suite bathrooms can actually make the space seem much larger than it is,” John says. “Because there are less grout lines and details, you can create these really crisp, clean spaces that are visually beautiful and really increase the feeling of space in what would otherwise be a noticeably small area.”

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In larger, open plan spaces, large format tiles work well too – often adding to an overall sense of light, airy free flowing rooms, again by offering larger expanses without multiple grout lines.

Another trend that stood out to John at Cersaie was the continued use of contrasting tiles, be it different looks or sizes, to define and accentuate spaces. “I think that’s where we are headed in New Zealand too. We’ve done a lot of projects recently where people are using different tiles to create a level of visual impact, or to define areas within an open plan space. In bathrooms, for example, people may choose to use wood-look plank tiles combined with larger format stone-look tiles as a feature wall.”

In larger, open plan spaces, large format tiles work well too – often adding to an overall sense of light, airy free flowing rooms, again by offering larger expanses without multiple grout lines.

Another trend that stood out to John at Cersaie was the continued use of contrasting tiles, be it different looks or sizes, to define and accentuate spaces. “I think that’s where we are headed in New Zealand too. We’ve done a lot of projects recently where people are using different tiles to create a level of visual impact, or to define areas within an open plan space. In bathrooms, for example, people may choose to use wood-look plank tiles combined with larger format stone-look tiles as a feature wall.”

Tiles are also being used in all areas of the home much more frequently than they have been before, John says. “In New Zealand, tiles are often chosen because of their durability. Our sun here is very harsh and tiles perform well in our harsh climates and we’re seeing people use tiles throughout the home, everywhere from kitchens and bathrooms to living areas, hallways and bedrooms.”

And with living areas designed to flow from inside to outside, tiles are an ideal option to create a seamless look with options available that are suitable for both interior and exterior applications.

Tiles are also being used in all areas of the home much more frequently than they have been before, John says. “In New Zealand, tiles are often chosen because of their durability. Our sun here is very harsh and tiles perform well in our harsh climates and we’re seeing people use tiles throughout the home, everywhere from kitchens and bathrooms to living areas, hallways and bedrooms.”

And with living areas designed to flow from inside to outside, tiles are an ideal option to create a seamless look with options available that are suitable for both interior and exterior applications.

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For John, he sees the future of tiles as a bright one, with the industry going from strength to strength. At the moment, MC Tiles’ most sought after range is known as Waterfront. It’s a luxurious Italian-made range of tiles. “Waterfront marries the essence of fired tiles and cement. The two styles have been brought together in a single project: the tradition and warmth of fired tiles share their uniqueness with the minimal and modern look of cement with a beautiful textured finish.

“In a natural stone look for inside and out there is Spazzolata. Obtained from quarries in a small area of the Julian Pre-Alps, Piasentina stone derives its name from the people of Udine, who used to describe it in the local dialect as the stone which “la piase”, or “pleases”. Spazzolata expresses the processes by which this extraordinary stone is transformed, from the time of quarrying until its final acquisition of new forms and meanings.”

Get in touch with MC Tiles on ArchiPro here for the latest inspiration in European ceramic tiles.

For John, he sees the future of tiles as a bright one, with the industry going from strength to strength. At the moment, MC Tiles’ most sought after range is known as Waterfront. It’s a luxurious Italian-made range of tiles. “Waterfront marries the essence of fired tiles and cement. The two styles have been brought together in a single project: the tradition and warmth of fired tiles share their uniqueness with the minimal and modern look of cement with a beautiful textured finish.

“In a natural stone look for inside and out there is Spazzolata. Obtained from quarries in a small area of the Julian Pre-Alps, Piasentina stone derives its name from the people of Udine, who used to describe it in the local dialect as the stone which “la piase”, or “pleases”. Spazzolata expresses the processes by which this extraordinary stone is transformed, from the time of quarrying until its final acquisition of new forms and meanings.”

Get in touch with MC Tiles on ArchiPro here for the latest inspiration in European ceramic tiles.

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