Cooking with wood: the flame-fired cooktop

Cooking with wood: the flame-fired cooktop

Using a wood-fired cooktop harks back to days gone by, but the contemporary version of this basic way of cooking has made a comeback in Europe, and the idea is quickly catching on in New Zealand...

Words by ArchiPro Editorial Team

Using a wood-fired cooktop harks back to days gone by, but the contemporary version of this basic way of cooking has made a comeback in Europe, and the idea is quickly catching on in New Zealand. We had a chat to Envirosolve about cooking with wood, and the latest in home heating.

Tiba Alpen
Tiba Alpen

Like a dishwasher, the contemporary wood-fired stove cooktop sits flush with the cabinetry under the benchtop. Creating a dramatic visual statement, it offers a classic nuance to the kitchen in a very modern way, while incorporating the most traditional way of cooking into the 21st Century home. Wood-fired cooktops are a dynamic addition to the kitchen, allowing for precise temperature control and seamless cooking along with the fundamental process of creating heat and a glass flame viewer, Envirosolve’s Dr Rene Haeberli says.

 

“Cooking with wood has a lot of appeal to a lot of people, primarily because wood is carbon neutral and 100 per cent renewable. The idea of using wood in the modern kitchen is also appealing because it creates a more engaged cooking process, rather than simply flicking a switch or turning on the gas. In this way, cooking becomes a more traditional process with modern comforts at hand.” Known as the Tiba Fuego Inbuilt Wood Cooking Stove, it is a concept and design that originates in Switzerland, and is fully customisable in colour, size and finish to allow for precise matching with cabinetry and decor. 

 

“Just as a wood fire demands attention, so too does the Fuego stove,” Rene says. “The large viewing window awakens emotions and brings cosiness, comfort and functionality into everyway life. 

 

“The modern construction and technology opens up completely new possibilities for kitchen construction and the integration of a wood stove into a fitted kitchen. Like a commercial electric cooker, the Fuego can be integrated into a kitchen with different cover designs and fits neatly and seamlessly into any kitchen.”

The options for customisation are vast, with ceramic or steel cooktops available and a large range of colours. With zero clearance needed, they can be flush mounted with the cabinetry to create a seamless yet alluring visual appeal. 

 

Like the stove, the options for wood and gas fires have rapidly expanded over the last few years, and along with cooking options, Envirosolve specialises in providing the latest technology from Europe, including the Tiba Jura - the contemporary Aga oven and cooktop that can be connected to heat a home’s water and integrated with solar power for when it is used less in winter to deliver year-round hot water without the need for electricity. “These can also be used to heat the home, if integrated with central heating systems, and because they are not a woodburner, rather a cooking appliance, they are often exempt from the consents required for traditional woodburners and gas fires,” Rene says.

 

The other futuristic wood fires are known as bionic fires and are the first fully automatic, mechanic downdraft burners in New Zealand, which means they are also classified as Ultra Low Emission Burners (ULEB), allowing them to be used in areas such as Canterbury where restrictions are stringent.  “These fires not only look stunning but burn very little wood extremely efficiently. For softwoods like pine, to heat a 150 square metre area they only need as little as one kilogram per hour. For hardwoods, that drops to 750 grams per hour.

 

 

Tiba Fuego
Tiba Fuego

“They can also swivel 360 degrees so the heat can be directed to the areas people are using, and the flames can be enjoyed from any angle. Bionic fires burn around 70 per cent less wood than traditional woodburners, which is extremely useful as it means less space is needed to store wood, less wood needs to be carried or chopped, and there is significantly less ash created.”

 

Gas fires are similar in terms of their rapidly advancing functionality, with the latest technology offering a unique thermal mass system that works without power to continue heating the home for up to seven hours after the fire has been turned off. 

“Our RAIS series fires are iconically round, streamlined and offer the beauty of Scandinavian simplicity.” Depending on the model chosen, up to 96kg of concrete stones are stored in the fire, which capture and store the heat created when the fire is on, slowly releasing it into the home over the following seven hours. 

 

“All our products, for cooking and wood and gas fires are suitable for passive and energy efficient homes.”

 

If you’re considering a new or alternative cooking or heating solution for the home, make sure you visit Envirosolve on ArchiPro here to explore the latest in Danish and Swiss design and technology. 

Tiba Jura 674
Tiba Jura 674

Envirosolve

The company Envirosolve Ltd brings quality products from different European countries to New Zealand and Australia covering bionic fires and gas fires from RAIS ,...

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Cooking with wood: the flame-fired cooktop
Cooking with wood: the flame-fired cooktop

Cooking with wood: the flame-fired cooktop

Using a wood-fired cooktop harks back to days gone by, but the contemporary version of this basic way of cooking has made a comeback in Europe, and the idea is quickly catching on in New Zealand...

Words by ArchiPro Editorial Team

Using a wood-fired cooktop harks back to days gone by, but the contemporary version of this basic way of cooking has made a comeback in Europe, and the idea is quickly catching on in New Zealand. We had a chat to Envirosolve about cooking with wood, and the latest in home heating.

Tiba Alpen
Tiba Alpen

Like a dishwasher, the contemporary wood-fired stove cooktop sits flush with the cabinetry under the benchtop. Creating a dramatic visual statement, it offers a classic nuance to the kitchen in a very modern way, while incorporating the most traditional way of cooking into the 21st Century home. Wood-fired cooktops are a dynamic addition to the kitchen, allowing for precise temperature control and seamless cooking along with the fundamental process of creating heat and a glass flame viewer, Envirosolve’s Dr Rene Haeberli says.

 

“Cooking with wood has a lot of appeal to a lot of people, primarily because wood is carbon neutral and 100 per cent renewable. The idea of using wood in the modern kitchen is also appealing because it creates a more engaged cooking process, rather than simply flicking a switch or turning on the gas. In this way, cooking becomes a more traditional process with modern comforts at hand.” Known as the Tiba Fuego Inbuilt Wood Cooking Stove, it is a concept and design that originates in Switzerland, and is fully customisable in colour, size and finish to allow for precise matching with cabinetry and decor. 

 

“Just as a wood fire demands attention, so too does the Fuego stove,” Rene says. “The large viewing window awakens emotions and brings cosiness, comfort and functionality into everyway life. 

 

“The modern construction and technology opens up completely new possibilities for kitchen construction and the integration of a wood stove into a fitted kitchen. Like a commercial electric cooker, the Fuego can be integrated into a kitchen with different cover designs and fits neatly and seamlessly into any kitchen.”

The options for customisation are vast, with ceramic or steel cooktops available and a large range of colours. With zero clearance needed, they can be flush mounted with the cabinetry to create a seamless yet alluring visual appeal. 

 

Like the stove, the options for wood and gas fires have rapidly expanded over the last few years, and along with cooking options, Envirosolve specialises in providing the latest technology from Europe, including the Tiba Jura - the contemporary Aga oven and cooktop that can be connected to heat a home’s water and integrated with solar power for when it is used less in winter to deliver year-round hot water without the need for electricity. “These can also be used to heat the home, if integrated with central heating systems, and because they are not a woodburner, rather a cooking appliance, they are often exempt from the consents required for traditional woodburners and gas fires,” Rene says.

 

The other futuristic wood fires are known as bionic fires and are the first fully automatic, mechanic downdraft burners in New Zealand, which means they are also classified as Ultra Low Emission Burners (ULEB), allowing them to be used in areas such as Canterbury where restrictions are stringent.  “These fires not only look stunning but burn very little wood extremely efficiently. For softwoods like pine, to heat a 150 square metre area they only need as little as one kilogram per hour. For hardwoods, that drops to 750 grams per hour.

 

 

Tiba Fuego
Tiba Fuego

“They can also swivel 360 degrees so the heat can be directed to the areas people are using, and the flames can be enjoyed from any angle. Bionic fires burn around 70 per cent less wood than traditional woodburners, which is extremely useful as it means less space is needed to store wood, less wood needs to be carried or chopped, and there is significantly less ash created.”

 

Gas fires are similar in terms of their rapidly advancing functionality, with the latest technology offering a unique thermal mass system that works without power to continue heating the home for up to seven hours after the fire has been turned off. 

“Our RAIS series fires are iconically round, streamlined and offer the beauty of Scandinavian simplicity.” Depending on the model chosen, up to 96kg of concrete stones are stored in the fire, which capture and store the heat created when the fire is on, slowly releasing it into the home over the following seven hours. 

 

“All our products, for cooking and wood and gas fires are suitable for passive and energy efficient homes.”

 

If you’re considering a new or alternative cooking or heating solution for the home, make sure you visit Envirosolve on ArchiPro here to explore the latest in Danish and Swiss design and technology. 

Tiba Jura 674
Tiba Jura 674

Envirosolve

The company Envirosolve Ltd brings quality products from different European countries to New Zealand and Australia covering bionic fires and gas fires from RAIS ,...

Recommended reading
Done tagging
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Cooking with wood: the flame-fired cooktop

Cooking with wood: the flame-fired cooktop

Using a wood-fired cooktop harks back to days gone by, but the contemporary version of this basic way of cooking has made a comeback in Europe, and the idea is quickly catching on in New Zealand...

Words by ArchiPro Editorial Team

Using a wood-fired cooktop harks back to days gone by, but the contemporary version of this basic way of cooking has made a comeback in Europe, and the idea is quickly catching on in New Zealand. We had a chat to Envirosolve about cooking with wood, and the latest in home heating.

Tiba Alpen
Tiba Alpen

Like a dishwasher, the contemporary wood-fired stove cooktop sits flush with the cabinetry under the benchtop. Creating a dramatic visual statement, it offers a classic nuance to the kitchen in a very modern way, while incorporating the most traditional way of cooking into the 21st Century home. Wood-fired cooktops are a dynamic addition to the kitchen, allowing for precise temperature control and seamless cooking along with the fundamental process of creating heat and a glass flame viewer, Envirosolve’s Dr Rene Haeberli says.

 

“Cooking with wood has a lot of appeal to a lot of people, primarily because wood is carbon neutral and 100 per cent renewable. The idea of using wood in the modern kitchen is also appealing because it creates a more engaged cooking process, rather than simply flicking a switch or turning on the gas. In this way, cooking becomes a more traditional process with modern comforts at hand.” Known as the Tiba Fuego Inbuilt Wood Cooking Stove, it is a concept and design that originates in Switzerland, and is fully customisable in colour, size and finish to allow for precise matching with cabinetry and decor. 

 

“Just as a wood fire demands attention, so too does the Fuego stove,” Rene says. “The large viewing window awakens emotions and brings cosiness, comfort and functionality into everyway life. 

 

“The modern construction and technology opens up completely new possibilities for kitchen construction and the integration of a wood stove into a fitted kitchen. Like a commercial electric cooker, the Fuego can be integrated into a kitchen with different cover designs and fits neatly and seamlessly into any kitchen.”

The options for customisation are vast, with ceramic or steel cooktops available and a large range of colours. With zero clearance needed, they can be flush mounted with the cabinetry to create a seamless yet alluring visual appeal. 

 

Like the stove, the options for wood and gas fires have rapidly expanded over the last few years, and along with cooking options, Envirosolve specialises in providing the latest technology from Europe, including the Tiba Jura - the contemporary Aga oven and cooktop that can be connected to heat a home’s water and integrated with solar power for when it is used less in winter to deliver year-round hot water without the need for electricity. “These can also be used to heat the home, if integrated with central heating systems, and because they are not a woodburner, rather a cooking appliance, they are often exempt from the consents required for traditional woodburners and gas fires,” Rene says.

 

The other futuristic wood fires are known as bionic fires and are the first fully automatic, mechanic downdraft burners in New Zealand, which means they are also classified as Ultra Low Emission Burners (ULEB), allowing them to be used in areas such as Canterbury where restrictions are stringent.  “These fires not only look stunning but burn very little wood extremely efficiently. For softwoods like pine, to heat a 150 square metre area they only need as little as one kilogram per hour. For hardwoods, that drops to 750 grams per hour.

 

 

Tiba Fuego
Tiba Fuego

“They can also swivel 360 degrees so the heat can be directed to the areas people are using, and the flames can be enjoyed from any angle. Bionic fires burn around 70 per cent less wood than traditional woodburners, which is extremely useful as it means less space is needed to store wood, less wood needs to be carried or chopped, and there is significantly less ash created.”

 

Gas fires are similar in terms of their rapidly advancing functionality, with the latest technology offering a unique thermal mass system that works without power to continue heating the home for up to seven hours after the fire has been turned off. 

“Our RAIS series fires are iconically round, streamlined and offer the beauty of Scandinavian simplicity.” Depending on the model chosen, up to 96kg of concrete stones are stored in the fire, which capture and store the heat created when the fire is on, slowly releasing it into the home over the following seven hours. 

 

“All our products, for cooking and wood and gas fires are suitable for passive and energy efficient homes.”

 

If you’re considering a new or alternative cooking or heating solution for the home, make sure you visit Envirosolve on ArchiPro here to explore the latest in Danish and Swiss design and technology. 

Tiba Jura 674
Tiba Jura 674

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