Heating and cooling for a low-carbon future

Heating and cooling for a low-carbon future

How do we heat and cool our homes in line with the new Zero Carbon legislation?

Words by Justine Harvey

How can we heat and cool our homes in line with the new Zero Carbon legislation to ensure our energy consumption is not contributing to global warming?

Having recently passed its third reading in Parliament, The Climate Change Response (Zero Carbon) Amendment Bill aims to reduce all greenhouse gases (except biogenic methane) to net zero by 2050 as part of the famous global accord made in Paris. Reducing carbon emissions basically means replacing fossil fuel-based energy – derived from oil, gas and coal – with renewable energy – converted from sunlight, wind, hydroelectric, geothermal, ocean, hydrogen and biomass.

Part of the New Zealand Government’s overall strategy in the Bill is to end the use of fossil fuel-based systems in new buildings after 2024, and to remove fossil fuels in all existing buildings by 2030.

“Society has a short period of time to move from fossil fuels to renewable energy systems,” explains Adrian Kerr from Kiwi company Temperzone. “And heating our homes is one of those key areas where there’s an opportunity to reduce carbon emissions as we transition from a fossil fuel-based society to a renewable energy-based society.”

Currently, heating and cooling our homes with traditional HVAC (heating, ventilation and air conditioning) systems can negatively affect the environment in two ways: they can consume electricity that is produced by burning fossil fuels and they also use refrigerants that are powerful greenhouse gas pollutants.

“In New Zealand, we are fortunate to have an 80 to 85 percent renewable electricity system, so, rather than burning gas in a gas heater or fire, we can produce the same heat for a quarter of the energy input using a heat pump water heater. However, as our infrastructure becomes more electrified, then the demand on the electricity sector increases. We need to either add a lot more energy generation, or greatly improve energy efficiency in our homes and workplaces. It’s more cost-effective, and results in a reduced environmental impact to improve energy efficiency,” explains Adrian, who heads Temperzone’s Research and Development team.

We also need to look at our commercial HVAC system designs. Over the past two decades, the HVAC industry has largely replaced water as an energy distributor within buildings with refrigerant in the small-to-medium commercial sector. However, the current hydrofluorocarbon (HFCs) refrigerants are very powerful global-warming chemicals, and the new low global warming potential (GWP) refrigerants tend to be mildly flammable. Regulations constrain the amount of these refrigerants that can be within the building, and this is resulting in a trend back towards water-based systems.

To put it into perspective, 1kg of HFC released into the air is roughly equivalent to a year’s emissions of an average car that’s driving 12,000km – this is a significant!” says Adrian. “So, as an industry, we can lower our impact on global warming by changing refrigerant from R410A to R32. This reduces the GHG emissions by 75 to 80 percent per kilowatts of cooling or heating.”

Over the past few years, Temperzone, as the largest manufacturer of commercial HVAC equipment in Australasia, has invested in developing a new approach to the delivery of heating and cooling in all buildings, including homes. “As part of our broader strategy to reduce greenhouse emissions, we’ve been moving towards water-based, in-line hydronic systems. These products directly heat or cool the water as required, without the need for large buffer tanks found in traditional systems. This approach is more energy efficient, and substantially reduces the refrigerant charge in the system,” explains Adrian.

The Kiwi company is now the market leader in hydronic heating and cooling systems and its innovative new MAGNUS range further improves the effectiveness and efficiency of integrated systems. For example, its underfloor heating combines a variable-capacity BLDC pump and inverter compressor technologies to efficiently maintain a constant supply water temperature under the widest possible range of ambient conditions.

 

MAGNUS can be used in mid-to-large sized houses right up to large commercial buildings, even hospitals,” says Adrian. “We have developed a range of modular designed systems that are optimised for different applications, whether it be underfloor heating, space heating and cooling, domestic hot water, heating swimming and spa pools. This enables the selection of the correct model of unit for the application to heat and cool. No one else is doing that and there are substantial cost and efficiency reasons for doing it.”

“With our system, you end up with between 65 and 75 percent reduction in energy consumption compared to just using electricity to heat water,” he says. “The capital cost is higher but it will repay itself in around the three-year mark and, with commercial projects, there will generally be a return on investment within one to two years.”

Currently, the trend is towards whole of house heating and cooling. “People tend to want zoned heating and cooling throughout the house rather than just heating a few rooms. Our underfloor heating systems offer background heating throughout the house, with zoned supplementary heating and cooling on demand. We also provide solutions for European-style, fan-assisted radiator heating and cooling systems”, says Adrian. “Even though we are seeing more passive solar houses, which are fantastic when people build to that standard, a lot of people want large houses with vast amounts of glass and, even with high-performance windows, most homes will still need a heating system.”

One of the most important areas that needs to be addressed in the move towards a zero-carbon future is the removal of fossil fuel boilers used for space heating, water heating and process heat applications. MAGNUS heat pump water heaters have proven to be a perfect product for the replacement of such boiler systems. Having application specific heat-pumps means larger centralized boiler systems can be replaced with a distributed network of heat pumps servicing the specific heating demands. This means heating is only delivered when and where required leading not only to a significant reduction in carbon emissions but also significant energy and maintenance cost savings. Northland DHB replaced existing boiler systems over Kaitaia and Dargaville hospitals achieving annual savings over $300,000 on energy and maintenance costs, and reduced annual carbon emissions of 794 tonnes.

The unique MAGNUS heat pump in-line single pass technology has also enabled the world’s first synergistically integrated heat pump / solar thermal system for hot water. The innovation has allowed the two technologies to work together synergistically, rather than competitively. Installed at Mt Cook YHA, the MAGNUS in-line single-pass technology allows the production of just enough hot water to meet the peak demand periods, which are in the morning and evening outside the peak solar heating period. The solar thermal system then meets the low demand part of the day. With differing occupancy through the year, the peak demand goes up and down. Single-pass technology allows the production of hot water to be matched to the actual demand. This provides significant savings on both infrastructure and running costs. This synergistic system provided annual energy savings of $28,700 and reduced annual carbon emissions of 34.7 tonnes over the gas boiler system.

This uniquely designed system helped assist YHA in becoming the first accommodation network in the world to achieve carboNZero certification. This resulted in YHA and Sunshine Solar being finalists in the 2019 Deloitte Energy Excellence Awards - Low Carbon Future Category, and this system won the SEANZ Best Environmental Impact Award – 2019.

“At Temperzone, we are focused on being a part of New Zealand’s transition to a low carbon future.”

 

Established 63 years ago, Temperzone is a New Zealand-owned family company with two factories – in Auckland and Sydney – that employ 800 people. It is currently the largest manufacturer of commercial HVAC equipment in Australasia, supplying to New Zealand, Australia and South-east Asia, and the market leader in hydronic HVAC systems, due to their durable, reliable and long-lasting products.

Temperzone

Chances are very high you've already experienced Temperzone air conditioning. We're New Zealand's longest established manufacturer, exporter and distributor of air and...

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Heating and cooling for a low-carbon future
Heating and cooling for a low-carbon future

Heating and cooling for a low-carbon future

How do we heat and cool our homes in line with the new Zero Carbon legislation?

Words by Justine Harvey

How can we heat and cool our homes in line with the new Zero Carbon legislation to ensure our energy consumption is not contributing to global warming?

Having recently passed its third reading in Parliament, The Climate Change Response (Zero Carbon) Amendment Bill aims to reduce all greenhouse gases (except biogenic methane) to net zero by 2050 as part of the famous global accord made in Paris. Reducing carbon emissions basically means replacing fossil fuel-based energy – derived from oil, gas and coal – with renewable energy – converted from sunlight, wind, hydroelectric, geothermal, ocean, hydrogen and biomass.

Part of the New Zealand Government’s overall strategy in the Bill is to end the use of fossil fuel-based systems in new buildings after 2024, and to remove fossil fuels in all existing buildings by 2030.

“Society has a short period of time to move from fossil fuels to renewable energy systems,” explains Adrian Kerr from Kiwi company Temperzone. “And heating our homes is one of those key areas where there’s an opportunity to reduce carbon emissions as we transition from a fossil fuel-based society to a renewable energy-based society.”

Currently, heating and cooling our homes with traditional HVAC (heating, ventilation and air conditioning) systems can negatively affect the environment in two ways: they can consume electricity that is produced by burning fossil fuels and they also use refrigerants that are powerful greenhouse gas pollutants.

“In New Zealand, we are fortunate to have an 80 to 85 percent renewable electricity system, so, rather than burning gas in a gas heater or fire, we can produce the same heat for a quarter of the energy input using a heat pump water heater. However, as our infrastructure becomes more electrified, then the demand on the electricity sector increases. We need to either add a lot more energy generation, or greatly improve energy efficiency in our homes and workplaces. It’s more cost-effective, and results in a reduced environmental impact to improve energy efficiency,” explains Adrian, who heads Temperzone’s Research and Development team.

We also need to look at our commercial HVAC system designs. Over the past two decades, the HVAC industry has largely replaced water as an energy distributor within buildings with refrigerant in the small-to-medium commercial sector. However, the current hydrofluorocarbon (HFCs) refrigerants are very powerful global-warming chemicals, and the new low global warming potential (GWP) refrigerants tend to be mildly flammable. Regulations constrain the amount of these refrigerants that can be within the building, and this is resulting in a trend back towards water-based systems.

To put it into perspective, 1kg of HFC released into the air is roughly equivalent to a year’s emissions of an average car that’s driving 12,000km – this is a significant!” says Adrian. “So, as an industry, we can lower our impact on global warming by changing refrigerant from R410A to R32. This reduces the GHG emissions by 75 to 80 percent per kilowatts of cooling or heating.”

Over the past few years, Temperzone, as the largest manufacturer of commercial HVAC equipment in Australasia, has invested in developing a new approach to the delivery of heating and cooling in all buildings, including homes. “As part of our broader strategy to reduce greenhouse emissions, we’ve been moving towards water-based, in-line hydronic systems. These products directly heat or cool the water as required, without the need for large buffer tanks found in traditional systems. This approach is more energy efficient, and substantially reduces the refrigerant charge in the system,” explains Adrian.

The Kiwi company is now the market leader in hydronic heating and cooling systems and its innovative new MAGNUS range further improves the effectiveness and efficiency of integrated systems. For example, its underfloor heating combines a variable-capacity BLDC pump and inverter compressor technologies to efficiently maintain a constant supply water temperature under the widest possible range of ambient conditions.

 

MAGNUS can be used in mid-to-large sized houses right up to large commercial buildings, even hospitals,” says Adrian. “We have developed a range of modular designed systems that are optimised for different applications, whether it be underfloor heating, space heating and cooling, domestic hot water, heating swimming and spa pools. This enables the selection of the correct model of unit for the application to heat and cool. No one else is doing that and there are substantial cost and efficiency reasons for doing it.”

“With our system, you end up with between 65 and 75 percent reduction in energy consumption compared to just using electricity to heat water,” he says. “The capital cost is higher but it will repay itself in around the three-year mark and, with commercial projects, there will generally be a return on investment within one to two years.”

Currently, the trend is towards whole of house heating and cooling. “People tend to want zoned heating and cooling throughout the house rather than just heating a few rooms. Our underfloor heating systems offer background heating throughout the house, with zoned supplementary heating and cooling on demand. We also provide solutions for European-style, fan-assisted radiator heating and cooling systems”, says Adrian. “Even though we are seeing more passive solar houses, which are fantastic when people build to that standard, a lot of people want large houses with vast amounts of glass and, even with high-performance windows, most homes will still need a heating system.”

One of the most important areas that needs to be addressed in the move towards a zero-carbon future is the removal of fossil fuel boilers used for space heating, water heating and process heat applications. MAGNUS heat pump water heaters have proven to be a perfect product for the replacement of such boiler systems. Having application specific heat-pumps means larger centralized boiler systems can be replaced with a distributed network of heat pumps servicing the specific heating demands. This means heating is only delivered when and where required leading not only to a significant reduction in carbon emissions but also significant energy and maintenance cost savings. Northland DHB replaced existing boiler systems over Kaitaia and Dargaville hospitals achieving annual savings over $300,000 on energy and maintenance costs, and reduced annual carbon emissions of 794 tonnes.

The unique MAGNUS heat pump in-line single pass technology has also enabled the world’s first synergistically integrated heat pump / solar thermal system for hot water. The innovation has allowed the two technologies to work together synergistically, rather than competitively. Installed at Mt Cook YHA, the MAGNUS in-line single-pass technology allows the production of just enough hot water to meet the peak demand periods, which are in the morning and evening outside the peak solar heating period. The solar thermal system then meets the low demand part of the day. With differing occupancy through the year, the peak demand goes up and down. Single-pass technology allows the production of hot water to be matched to the actual demand. This provides significant savings on both infrastructure and running costs. This synergistic system provided annual energy savings of $28,700 and reduced annual carbon emissions of 34.7 tonnes over the gas boiler system.

This uniquely designed system helped assist YHA in becoming the first accommodation network in the world to achieve carboNZero certification. This resulted in YHA and Sunshine Solar being finalists in the 2019 Deloitte Energy Excellence Awards - Low Carbon Future Category, and this system won the SEANZ Best Environmental Impact Award – 2019.

“At Temperzone, we are focused on being a part of New Zealand’s transition to a low carbon future.”

 

Established 63 years ago, Temperzone is a New Zealand-owned family company with two factories – in Auckland and Sydney – that employ 800 people. It is currently the largest manufacturer of commercial HVAC equipment in Australasia, supplying to New Zealand, Australia and South-east Asia, and the market leader in hydronic HVAC systems, due to their durable, reliable and long-lasting products.

Temperzone

Chances are very high you've already experienced Temperzone air conditioning. We're New Zealand's longest established manufacturer, exporter and distributor of air and...

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Heating and cooling for a low-carbon future

Heating and cooling for a low-carbon future

How do we heat and cool our homes in line with the new Zero Carbon legislation?

Words by Justine Harvey

How can we heat and cool our homes in line with the new Zero Carbon legislation to ensure our energy consumption is not contributing to global warming?

Having recently passed its third reading in Parliament, The Climate Change Response (Zero Carbon) Amendment Bill aims to reduce all greenhouse gases (except biogenic methane) to net zero by 2050 as part of the famous global accord made in Paris. Reducing carbon emissions basically means replacing fossil fuel-based energy – derived from oil, gas and coal – with renewable energy – converted from sunlight, wind, hydroelectric, geothermal, ocean, hydrogen and biomass.

Part of the New Zealand Government’s overall strategy in the Bill is to end the use of fossil fuel-based systems in new buildings after 2024, and to remove fossil fuels in all existing buildings by 2030.

“Society has a short period of time to move from fossil fuels to renewable energy systems,” explains Adrian Kerr from Kiwi company Temperzone. “And heating our homes is one of those key areas where there’s an opportunity to reduce carbon emissions as we transition from a fossil fuel-based society to a renewable energy-based society.”

Currently, heating and cooling our homes with traditional HVAC (heating, ventilation and air conditioning) systems can negatively affect the environment in two ways: they can consume electricity that is produced by burning fossil fuels and they also use refrigerants that are powerful greenhouse gas pollutants.

“In New Zealand, we are fortunate to have an 80 to 85 percent renewable electricity system, so, rather than burning gas in a gas heater or fire, we can produce the same heat for a quarter of the energy input using a heat pump water heater. However, as our infrastructure becomes more electrified, then the demand on the electricity sector increases. We need to either add a lot more energy generation, or greatly improve energy efficiency in our homes and workplaces. It’s more cost-effective, and results in a reduced environmental impact to improve energy efficiency,” explains Adrian, who heads Temperzone’s Research and Development team.

We also need to look at our commercial HVAC system designs. Over the past two decades, the HVAC industry has largely replaced water as an energy distributor within buildings with refrigerant in the small-to-medium commercial sector. However, the current hydrofluorocarbon (HFCs) refrigerants are very powerful global-warming chemicals, and the new low global warming potential (GWP) refrigerants tend to be mildly flammable. Regulations constrain the amount of these refrigerants that can be within the building, and this is resulting in a trend back towards water-based systems.

To put it into perspective, 1kg of HFC released into the air is roughly equivalent to a year’s emissions of an average car that’s driving 12,000km – this is a significant!” says Adrian. “So, as an industry, we can lower our impact on global warming by changing refrigerant from R410A to R32. This reduces the GHG emissions by 75 to 80 percent per kilowatts of cooling or heating.”

Over the past few years, Temperzone, as the largest manufacturer of commercial HVAC equipment in Australasia, has invested in developing a new approach to the delivery of heating and cooling in all buildings, including homes. “As part of our broader strategy to reduce greenhouse emissions, we’ve been moving towards water-based, in-line hydronic systems. These products directly heat or cool the water as required, without the need for large buffer tanks found in traditional systems. This approach is more energy efficient, and substantially reduces the refrigerant charge in the system,” explains Adrian.

The Kiwi company is now the market leader in hydronic heating and cooling systems and its innovative new MAGNUS range further improves the effectiveness and efficiency of integrated systems. For example, its underfloor heating combines a variable-capacity BLDC pump and inverter compressor technologies to efficiently maintain a constant supply water temperature under the widest possible range of ambient conditions.

 

MAGNUS can be used in mid-to-large sized houses right up to large commercial buildings, even hospitals,” says Adrian. “We have developed a range of modular designed systems that are optimised for different applications, whether it be underfloor heating, space heating and cooling, domestic hot water, heating swimming and spa pools. This enables the selection of the correct model of unit for the application to heat and cool. No one else is doing that and there are substantial cost and efficiency reasons for doing it.”

“With our system, you end up with between 65 and 75 percent reduction in energy consumption compared to just using electricity to heat water,” he says. “The capital cost is higher but it will repay itself in around the three-year mark and, with commercial projects, there will generally be a return on investment within one to two years.”

Currently, the trend is towards whole of house heating and cooling. “People tend to want zoned heating and cooling throughout the house rather than just heating a few rooms. Our underfloor heating systems offer background heating throughout the house, with zoned supplementary heating and cooling on demand. We also provide solutions for European-style, fan-assisted radiator heating and cooling systems”, says Adrian. “Even though we are seeing more passive solar houses, which are fantastic when people build to that standard, a lot of people want large houses with vast amounts of glass and, even with high-performance windows, most homes will still need a heating system.”

One of the most important areas that needs to be addressed in the move towards a zero-carbon future is the removal of fossil fuel boilers used for space heating, water heating and process heat applications. MAGNUS heat pump water heaters have proven to be a perfect product for the replacement of such boiler systems. Having application specific heat-pumps means larger centralized boiler systems can be replaced with a distributed network of heat pumps servicing the specific heating demands. This means heating is only delivered when and where required leading not only to a significant reduction in carbon emissions but also significant energy and maintenance cost savings. Northland DHB replaced existing boiler systems over Kaitaia and Dargaville hospitals achieving annual savings over $300,000 on energy and maintenance costs, and reduced annual carbon emissions of 794 tonnes.

The unique MAGNUS heat pump in-line single pass technology has also enabled the world’s first synergistically integrated heat pump / solar thermal system for hot water. The innovation has allowed the two technologies to work together synergistically, rather than competitively. Installed at Mt Cook YHA, the MAGNUS in-line single-pass technology allows the production of just enough hot water to meet the peak demand periods, which are in the morning and evening outside the peak solar heating period. The solar thermal system then meets the low demand part of the day. With differing occupancy through the year, the peak demand goes up and down. Single-pass technology allows the production of hot water to be matched to the actual demand. This provides significant savings on both infrastructure and running costs. This synergistic system provided annual energy savings of $28,700 and reduced annual carbon emissions of 34.7 tonnes over the gas boiler system.

This uniquely designed system helped assist YHA in becoming the first accommodation network in the world to achieve carboNZero certification. This resulted in YHA and Sunshine Solar being finalists in the 2019 Deloitte Energy Excellence Awards - Low Carbon Future Category, and this system won the SEANZ Best Environmental Impact Award – 2019.

“At Temperzone, we are focused on being a part of New Zealand’s transition to a low carbon future.”

 

Established 63 years ago, Temperzone is a New Zealand-owned family company with two factories – in Auckland and Sydney – that employ 800 people. It is currently the largest manufacturer of commercial HVAC equipment in Australasia, supplying to New Zealand, Australia and South-east Asia, and the market leader in hydronic HVAC systems, due to their durable, reliable and long-lasting products.

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