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The circadian rhythms of human beings are dependent on natural light. Without it, the healthy functioning of our bodies can be disrupted, especially in the presence of static artificial lighting.

A circadian rhythm is roughly a 24-hour cycle in the physiological processes of a living being, including humans, animals and plants. Circadian rhythms are important in determining sleeping patterns, appetite and are linked to brain activity that relates to hormone production and cell regeneration. While circadian rhythms are, for the most part, created physiologically, there are certain external cues that can affect them, including sunlight and temperature.

Research points clearly to the importance of natural lighting, especially in places of learning, in hospitals and medical facilities and in aged care accommodation. “The problem with artificial and synthetic lighting is that it is static and it doesn’t give us those visual cues that natural lighting does,” HomeTech’s Manny Boyack says. “We know now that a lack of natural lighting leads to poor student performance, an increase in patient depression, and an increase in pain and recovery time for hospital patients.”

The circadian rhythms of human beings are dependent on natural light. Without it, the healthy functioning of our bodies can be disrupted, especially in the presence of static artificial lighting.

A circadian rhythm is roughly a 24-hour cycle in the physiological processes of a living being, including humans, animals and plants. Circadian rhythms are important in determining sleeping patterns, appetite and are linked to brain activity that relates to hormone production and cell regeneration. While circadian rhythms are, for the most part, created physiologically, there are certain external cues that can affect them, including sunlight and temperature.

Research points clearly to the importance of natural lighting, especially in places of learning, in hospitals and medical facilities and in aged care accommodation. “The problem with artificial and synthetic lighting is that it is static and it doesn’t give us those visual cues that natural lighting does,” HomeTech’s Manny Boyack says. “We know now that a lack of natural lighting leads to poor student performance, an increase in patient depression, and an increase in pain and recovery time for hospital patients.”

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As free land becomes less available and we move towards higher density living and multi-story facilities, the ability to utilise traditional fenestrations to allow for natural daylight often becomes limited. It is in these situations where designs need to cater for alternative options to draw natural light into buildings.

As free land becomes less available and we move towards higher density living and multi-story facilities, the ability to utilise traditional fenestrations to allow for natural daylight often becomes limited. It is in these situations where designs need to cater for alternative options to draw natural light into buildings.

“Tubular daylighting devices offer an innovative solution, especially in darker areas of a larger facility or in accommodation where there is a lack of natural lighting. What we are finding though, is these are often being installed retrospectively when in fact it is much better if they are considered and incorporated into an initial design.”

“Tubular daylighting devices offer an innovative solution, especially in darker areas of a larger facility or in accommodation where there is a lack of natural lighting. What we are finding though, is these are often being installed retrospectively when in fact it is much better if they are considered and incorporated into an initial design.”

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Boyack says Western Australia moved to a 100 per cent daylight policy for all new primary schools since 2011, by way of traditional windows and tubular daylighting solutions; to date over 4000 Solatubes have been installed in schools there. “It’s a move that I think should happen in New Zealand, and one that would be hugely beneficial for our young people, modern open classrooms, and more broadly in terms of building performance and energy savings.”

HomeTech started selling tubular natural daylighting solutions in New Zealand in 1992 and is a specialist in the area, with a large network of licensed accredited installers around the country that are experts in the installation and design requirements around their core product, Solatube.

Solatube daylighting devices bring natural daylight into areas where traditional skylights or windows cannot. “Sometimes called tubular skylights, light tubes or sun pipes, tubular daylighting devices are the ideal solution for lighting interiors in a cost-effective, energy-efficient and eco-friendly way,” Boyack says. “They significantly reduce the need for electricity while keeping people connected to the outdoor environment.”

Solatube daylighting devices are BRANZ-approved and work by capturing natural light through a dome installed on the roof. That light is then moved through an adjustable aluminium tube, which has a highly reflective interior coating. Light is reflected through the tube into a diffuser in the room, where it is distributed.

“The benefit of Solatube is that 99.7 per cent of light captured is transferred into the room via the non-metalized Spectralight Infinity coating, but at the same time minimal heat is transferred so while distributing light, it at the same time reduces a building’s energy loads,” Boyack says.

Solatubes can be used in areas that span lengths of up to 25 metres, 9 metres unsupported, and over various floors of multi-level buildings. They can be combined with lighting solutions, in which a sensor will turn lights on if the room reaches a certain level and requires additional lighting. Daylight dimmers can also be incorporated to control the amount of light in the tube from 0-100%, which is especially useful in classrooms and medical examination rooms.

Get in touch with HomeTech on ArchiPro here to discuss natural daylighting in your next project.

Boyack says Western Australia moved to a 100 per cent daylight policy for all new primary schools since 2011, by way of traditional windows and tubular daylighting solutions; to date over 4000 Solatubes have been installed in schools there. “It’s a move that I think should happen in New Zealand, and one that would be hugely beneficial for our young people, modern open classrooms, and more broadly in terms of building performance and energy savings.”

HomeTech started selling tubular natural daylighting solutions in New Zealand in 1992 and is a specialist in the area, with a large network of licensed accredited installers around the country that are experts in the installation and design requirements around their core product, Solatube.

Solatube daylighting devices bring natural daylight into areas where traditional skylights or windows cannot. “Sometimes called tubular skylights, light tubes or sun pipes, tubular daylighting devices are the ideal solution for lighting interiors in a cost-effective, energy-efficient and eco-friendly way,” Boyack says. “They significantly reduce the need for electricity while keeping people connected to the outdoor environment.”

Solatube daylighting devices are BRANZ-approved and work by capturing natural light through a dome installed on the roof. That light is then moved through an adjustable aluminium tube, which has a highly reflective interior coating. Light is reflected through the tube into a diffuser in the room, where it is distributed.

“The benefit of Solatube is that 99.7 per cent of light captured is transferred into the room via the non-metalized Spectralight Infinity coating, but at the same time minimal heat is transferred so while distributing light, it at the same time reduces a building’s energy loads,” Boyack says.

Solatubes can be used in areas that span lengths of up to 25 metres, 9 metres unsupported, and over various floors of multi-level buildings. They can be combined with lighting solutions, in which a sensor will turn lights on if the room reaches a certain level and requires additional lighting. Daylight dimmers can also be incorporated to control the amount of light in the tube from 0-100%, which is especially useful in classrooms and medical examination rooms.

Get in touch with HomeTech on ArchiPro here to discuss natural daylighting in your next project.

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