Designing the warm, welcoming and unique interiors of Matakana House

Designing the warm, welcoming and unique interiors of Matakana House

The interior of our Project of the Month, Matakana House, has a modern, elegant and timeless appeal offset by a liberal dash of uniqueness. We spoke with the interior designer Tomi Williams, of Indigo Design, about her approach to designing this warm and welcoming family home.

Words by ArchiPro Editorial Team

The interior of our Project of the Month, Matakana House, has a modern, elegant and timeless appeal offset by a liberal dash of uniqueness. We spoke with the interior designer Tomi Williams, of Indigo Design, about her approach to designing this warm and welcoming family home.

 

What was your brief from the owners of Matakana House?

The owners were building a ‘weekender’ just out of Matakana. The house was intended to be a second home that they could escape to over weekends or occupy for longer periods. It was also an opportunity for them to indulge in their passion for design and to create a truly individual home that reflected their family.

Overall, the owners had strong views about how they wanted the house to look and feel on the inside. In addition, the architecture of the house had set the design concept ­– with its cedar cladding, steel joinery and concrete. I strongly believe that the exterior of a home and the interior need to be connected and continuous.

The brief was to create an interior that is welcoming – not intimidating, and relaxed – not ‘flash’. As this was also a home from which they would often be entertaining, particular attention was to be given to the living and kitchen areas as these are the ‘hub’ of the home. The overall design aesthetic was driven by the owners’ modern and mid-century modern tendencies.

What was your response in terms of a design concept?

The design response drew strongly from the architecture, utilising materials like timber, steel and concrete wherever possible – threaded through the interiors in wall and ceiling panelling, the kitchen materials and finishes, cabinetry pieces and bathroom design.

The materials were balanced by Porters Paints ‘Popcorn’ white paint on the walls and softened by adding textures – like soft linen curtains, rugs and other furnishings – and the use of bold colour, such as the deep-teal wall colour in the snug and bright wallpaper in the playroom. These textures and colours were crucial to creating a design that was relaxed and welcoming, as specified by the client.

What were your biggest challenges?

As with any project, there are challenges along the way but this is all part of the process and, quite often, the challenge itself creates something with which you can be most proud.

The key – and the most challenging – aspect to the interior scheme was choosing the colour of the oak veneer used in the kitchen cabinetry, the panelling on the entrance and ceiling of the snug, and the room divider in the main dining/living area. We needed to achieve enough warmth from the wood, without it appearing too dark or chocolate and to ensure there were no red tones. This was a very collaborative process between the client, architect, cabinetmakers and myself, the interior designer.

How did you collaborate with the architect, client and builders?

I was brought into the project by the client once Glamuzina Architects had completed all the architectural plans, so it was really important that I interpreted the interiors in a way that was in keeping with the architects’ views about how it should look.

As such, we worked closely to agree finishes and key design elements – for example, the black trim between the wood panelling and the detailing around the kitchen cabinetry. Interior design elements were drawn up and documented by the architect, which ensured the cabinetmakers could execute the interior design vision.

We also had a great working relationship with the client and met regularly to discuss and review interior elements. The clients were extremely efficient and involved in the entire process, which, again, ensured that the vision was well executed.

 

What do you think about the end result?

This is one of the most outstanding architecturally-designed homes in the most beautiful setting that I have been fortunate enough to be involved with. For me, it was truly important that the interiors reflected the architecture and the environment – and I believe that it does. In addition to this, being able to meet the client’s brief is so important in what we do as interior designers – to create a home that truly reflects them – not us.

The snug is, perhaps, the best example of this being achieved for the client: it has depth in colour, warmth in wood tones, and texture in the materials used in the furnishings. The snug is ‘the space within the space’ that makes me most proud.

Read more on Matakana House here.

Indigo Design

We are a small studio aiming to create interiors that are personalised, classic and unique. Process: While every project is different our interior design process can...

Recommended reading
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Designing the warm, welcoming and unique interiors of Matakana House
Designing the warm, welcoming and unique interiors of Matakana House

Designing the warm, welcoming and unique interiors of Matakana House

The interior of our Project of the Month, Matakana House, has a modern, elegant and timeless appeal offset by a liberal dash of uniqueness. We spoke with the interior designer Tomi Williams, of Indigo Design, about her approach to designing this warm and welcoming family home.

Words by ArchiPro Editorial Team

The interior of our Project of the Month, Matakana House, has a modern, elegant and timeless appeal offset by a liberal dash of uniqueness. We spoke with the interior designer Tomi Williams, of Indigo Design, about her approach to designing this warm and welcoming family home.

 

What was your brief from the owners of Matakana House?

The owners were building a ‘weekender’ just out of Matakana. The house was intended to be a second home that they could escape to over weekends or occupy for longer periods. It was also an opportunity for them to indulge in their passion for design and to create a truly individual home that reflected their family.

Overall, the owners had strong views about how they wanted the house to look and feel on the inside. In addition, the architecture of the house had set the design concept ­– with its cedar cladding, steel joinery and concrete. I strongly believe that the exterior of a home and the interior need to be connected and continuous.

The brief was to create an interior that is welcoming – not intimidating, and relaxed – not ‘flash’. As this was also a home from which they would often be entertaining, particular attention was to be given to the living and kitchen areas as these are the ‘hub’ of the home. The overall design aesthetic was driven by the owners’ modern and mid-century modern tendencies.

What was your response in terms of a design concept?

The design response drew strongly from the architecture, utilising materials like timber, steel and concrete wherever possible – threaded through the interiors in wall and ceiling panelling, the kitchen materials and finishes, cabinetry pieces and bathroom design.

The materials were balanced by Porters Paints ‘Popcorn’ white paint on the walls and softened by adding textures – like soft linen curtains, rugs and other furnishings – and the use of bold colour, such as the deep-teal wall colour in the snug and bright wallpaper in the playroom. These textures and colours were crucial to creating a design that was relaxed and welcoming, as specified by the client.

What were your biggest challenges?

As with any project, there are challenges along the way but this is all part of the process and, quite often, the challenge itself creates something with which you can be most proud.

The key – and the most challenging – aspect to the interior scheme was choosing the colour of the oak veneer used in the kitchen cabinetry, the panelling on the entrance and ceiling of the snug, and the room divider in the main dining/living area. We needed to achieve enough warmth from the wood, without it appearing too dark or chocolate and to ensure there were no red tones. This was a very collaborative process between the client, architect, cabinetmakers and myself, the interior designer.

How did you collaborate with the architect, client and builders?

I was brought into the project by the client once Glamuzina Architects had completed all the architectural plans, so it was really important that I interpreted the interiors in a way that was in keeping with the architects’ views about how it should look.

As such, we worked closely to agree finishes and key design elements – for example, the black trim between the wood panelling and the detailing around the kitchen cabinetry. Interior design elements were drawn up and documented by the architect, which ensured the cabinetmakers could execute the interior design vision.

We also had a great working relationship with the client and met regularly to discuss and review interior elements. The clients were extremely efficient and involved in the entire process, which, again, ensured that the vision was well executed.

 

What do you think about the end result?

This is one of the most outstanding architecturally-designed homes in the most beautiful setting that I have been fortunate enough to be involved with. For me, it was truly important that the interiors reflected the architecture and the environment – and I believe that it does. In addition to this, being able to meet the client’s brief is so important in what we do as interior designers – to create a home that truly reflects them – not us.

The snug is, perhaps, the best example of this being achieved for the client: it has depth in colour, warmth in wood tones, and texture in the materials used in the furnishings. The snug is ‘the space within the space’ that makes me most proud.

Read more on Matakana House here.

Indigo Design

We are a small studio aiming to create interiors that are personalised, classic and unique. Process: While every project is different our interior design process can...

Recommended reading
Done tagging
Full screen
Designing the warm, welcoming and unique interiors of Matakana House

Designing the warm, welcoming and unique interiors of Matakana House

The interior of our Project of the Month, Matakana House, has a modern, elegant and timeless appeal offset by a liberal dash of uniqueness. We spoke with the interior designer Tomi Williams, of Indigo Design, about her approach to designing this warm and welcoming family home.

Words by ArchiPro Editorial Team

The interior of our Project of the Month, Matakana House, has a modern, elegant and timeless appeal offset by a liberal dash of uniqueness. We spoke with the interior designer Tomi Williams, of Indigo Design, about her approach to designing this warm and welcoming family home.

 

What was your brief from the owners of Matakana House?

The owners were building a ‘weekender’ just out of Matakana. The house was intended to be a second home that they could escape to over weekends or occupy for longer periods. It was also an opportunity for them to indulge in their passion for design and to create a truly individual home that reflected their family.

Overall, the owners had strong views about how they wanted the house to look and feel on the inside. In addition, the architecture of the house had set the design concept ­– with its cedar cladding, steel joinery and concrete. I strongly believe that the exterior of a home and the interior need to be connected and continuous.

The brief was to create an interior that is welcoming – not intimidating, and relaxed – not ‘flash’. As this was also a home from which they would often be entertaining, particular attention was to be given to the living and kitchen areas as these are the ‘hub’ of the home. The overall design aesthetic was driven by the owners’ modern and mid-century modern tendencies.

What was your response in terms of a design concept?

The design response drew strongly from the architecture, utilising materials like timber, steel and concrete wherever possible – threaded through the interiors in wall and ceiling panelling, the kitchen materials and finishes, cabinetry pieces and bathroom design.

The materials were balanced by Porters Paints ‘Popcorn’ white paint on the walls and softened by adding textures – like soft linen curtains, rugs and other furnishings – and the use of bold colour, such as the deep-teal wall colour in the snug and bright wallpaper in the playroom. These textures and colours were crucial to creating a design that was relaxed and welcoming, as specified by the client.

What were your biggest challenges?

As with any project, there are challenges along the way but this is all part of the process and, quite often, the challenge itself creates something with which you can be most proud.

The key – and the most challenging – aspect to the interior scheme was choosing the colour of the oak veneer used in the kitchen cabinetry, the panelling on the entrance and ceiling of the snug, and the room divider in the main dining/living area. We needed to achieve enough warmth from the wood, without it appearing too dark or chocolate and to ensure there were no red tones. This was a very collaborative process between the client, architect, cabinetmakers and myself, the interior designer.

How did you collaborate with the architect, client and builders?

I was brought into the project by the client once Glamuzina Architects had completed all the architectural plans, so it was really important that I interpreted the interiors in a way that was in keeping with the architects’ views about how it should look.

As such, we worked closely to agree finishes and key design elements – for example, the black trim between the wood panelling and the detailing around the kitchen cabinetry. Interior design elements were drawn up and documented by the architect, which ensured the cabinetmakers could execute the interior design vision.

We also had a great working relationship with the client and met regularly to discuss and review interior elements. The clients were extremely efficient and involved in the entire process, which, again, ensured that the vision was well executed.

 

What do you think about the end result?

This is one of the most outstanding architecturally-designed homes in the most beautiful setting that I have been fortunate enough to be involved with. For me, it was truly important that the interiors reflected the architecture and the environment – and I believe that it does. In addition to this, being able to meet the client’s brief is so important in what we do as interior designers – to create a home that truly reflects them – not us.

The snug is, perhaps, the best example of this being achieved for the client: it has depth in colour, warmth in wood tones, and texture in the materials used in the furnishings. The snug is ‘the space within the space’ that makes me most proud.

Read more on Matakana House here.

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