The latest trends in tiles

The latest trends in tiles

Tile trends tend to mirror interior design fashions and they can come and go just as quickly. We spoke to MC Tiles’ John Ryan about some of the trends coming from Europe and how your tile choices can be put together to create a look that won’t date.

Words by ArchiPro Editorial Team

Tile trends tend to mirror interior design fashions and they can come and go just as quickly. We spoke to MC Tiles’ John Ryan about some of the trends coming from Europe and how your tile choices can be put together to create a look that won’t date.

Large format mixes with small format

Large format is a trend that is becoming more and more popular because it works with the minimalist aesthetic that is currently trending in interiors.

Larger sized tiles, mean less grout lines and less distraction on the eye, says MC Tiles’ John Ryan, and big slabs are commonly being used as feature walls. “But the utilisation of combinations of sizes is becoming popular, as opposed to simply using one format of tile in a space.”

Slash by Imola
Slash by Imola

This look allows tiles from different price points to be used together to create a high-end look. In the large format John says statuario marble is a classic look and still very popular. This comes in a format as large as 3.2 metres by 1.6 metresand when used in feature spaces such as entranceways it can create a jaw-dropping effect.

Another more modern aesthetic gaining in popularity is large format industrial Corten steel-look tiles, popularly used on fireplaces, splashbacks and as feature walls in bathrooms.

Rectified, large format tiles give a clean look to a space, says John.

“Rectified tiles have a square edge, non-rectified have a cushioned or rolled edge. Cushioned edges require a wider grout line in between tiles. Rectified tiles allow for a tight minimalist grout line”

Colour “SLASH”

Colour is big right now in the tile world, and as such MC Tiles has brought in ‘SLASH’ from Italy – it’s a whole spectrum of coloured subway tiles ideal for feature walls or anywhere where a ‘pop’ of colour is desired.

“We’ve been starved of colour for such a long time, so we’ve brought in the whole colour palette. It includes a bright yellow and a bright green and a red, but also nice classic neutral tones.”

The beauty of it is there’s a textured and a plain option in each colour of the SLASH range so clients can satisfy their desire for a tactile surface while using colour. As they are a subway style tile, they can be laid vertically as a point of difference or in a herringbone format, which really gives a wow factor when combined with the colour, for feature walls and splashbacks.

Greenwood by rondine  
Greenwood by rondine  

Looking Natural

Textures inspired by nature have been big in interiors for the past couple of years, with warm, sandy tones taking the place of cooler neutrals. This has been mirrored in the tile world, and the ‘faux’-look wood tiles have come on in leaps and bounds from when the trend first surfaced, making them the go-to look for many designers and homeowners.

“Wood-look tiles have evolved to give the appearance of an authentic wooden floor compared with real wood and wood laminates from a practicality point of view wood look tiles are superior. Their durability, fade resistance to harsh New Zealand sun and overall ability to cope with everything from high heels to children and animals makes them a popular choice for both new builds and renovations.”

John says wood-look plank tiles are so popular they currently make up a third of all tile sales out of Italy according to his suppliers. “We have seen a significant lift in this look as Kiwis love their indoor/outdoor entertaining, especially at the beach house.”

Concrete goes clean

While concrete look tiles have been a popular choice for the past decade, the latest trend means the concrete tile has changed to a much less detailed look.

“We’re seeing a ‘clean’ concrete being used, without all the exposed aggregates in it,” says John.

This look is often seen now in a matte texture and is driven by the trend for seeing and feeling the tactile nature of raw materials, as pictured above. Combinations of clean concrete with marble or wood look tiles give an interesting take on industrial with classic natural products.

Confidence to mix and match

One of 2018's trends is consumers and designers are having fun with colour, texture, and format combinations – they’re no longer scared to mix it up and create their own look.

“We’re seeing a lot more people who are trying to make their tiling look interesting. That’s really important because when you’re paying top dollar for your house you don’t want your house to look the same as every other house on the street.”

People are making their homes into a work of art by using different combinations, says John, and it’s a way of elevating a look without elevating the budget.

“You don’t have to buy Italian to make it look expensive, but it does help; the right selection of tiles will give you that ‘wow’ factor. European suppliers give direction and flair. Smart selections with guidance from designers and architects or a good eye is what transforms a space from ‘nice’ to ‘impressive’. If you’re not polarising people you’re boring people, after all not everyone likes art by Andy Warhol, right?”

And that’s what’s currently being done with tiles: “we’re juxtaposing different textures, colours and formats, but the key is not to overdo it.”

 

Want to know more about how to combine tiles for a high-end look? Be sure to visit MC Tiles on ArchiPro today or drop into one of their Auckland showrooms to learn more.

 

Waterfront by Leonardo   
Waterfront by Leonardo   

MC Tiles

MC Tiles and Distribution Ltd is a New Zealand owned and operated tile importer, retailer, and distributor. Comprised of two retail outlets, an importation division, and...

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The latest trends in tiles
The latest trends in tiles

The latest trends in tiles

Tile trends tend to mirror interior design fashions and they can come and go just as quickly. We spoke to MC Tiles’ John Ryan about some of the trends coming from Europe and how your tile choices can be put together to create a look that won’t date.

Words by ArchiPro Editorial Team

Tile trends tend to mirror interior design fashions and they can come and go just as quickly. We spoke to MC Tiles’ John Ryan about some of the trends coming from Europe and how your tile choices can be put together to create a look that won’t date.

Large format mixes with small format

Large format is a trend that is becoming more and more popular because it works with the minimalist aesthetic that is currently trending in interiors.

Larger sized tiles, mean less grout lines and less distraction on the eye, says MC Tiles’ John Ryan, and big slabs are commonly being used as feature walls. “But the utilisation of combinations of sizes is becoming popular, as opposed to simply using one format of tile in a space.”

Slash by Imola
Slash by Imola

This look allows tiles from different price points to be used together to create a high-end look. In the large format John says statuario marble is a classic look and still very popular. This comes in a format as large as 3.2 metres by 1.6 metresand when used in feature spaces such as entranceways it can create a jaw-dropping effect.

Another more modern aesthetic gaining in popularity is large format industrial Corten steel-look tiles, popularly used on fireplaces, splashbacks and as feature walls in bathrooms.

Rectified, large format tiles give a clean look to a space, says John.

“Rectified tiles have a square edge, non-rectified have a cushioned or rolled edge. Cushioned edges require a wider grout line in between tiles. Rectified tiles allow for a tight minimalist grout line”

Colour “SLASH”

Colour is big right now in the tile world, and as such MC Tiles has brought in ‘SLASH’ from Italy – it’s a whole spectrum of coloured subway tiles ideal for feature walls or anywhere where a ‘pop’ of colour is desired.

“We’ve been starved of colour for such a long time, so we’ve brought in the whole colour palette. It includes a bright yellow and a bright green and a red, but also nice classic neutral tones.”

The beauty of it is there’s a textured and a plain option in each colour of the SLASH range so clients can satisfy their desire for a tactile surface while using colour. As they are a subway style tile, they can be laid vertically as a point of difference or in a herringbone format, which really gives a wow factor when combined with the colour, for feature walls and splashbacks.

Greenwood by rondine  
Greenwood by rondine  

Looking Natural

Textures inspired by nature have been big in interiors for the past couple of years, with warm, sandy tones taking the place of cooler neutrals. This has been mirrored in the tile world, and the ‘faux’-look wood tiles have come on in leaps and bounds from when the trend first surfaced, making them the go-to look for many designers and homeowners.

“Wood-look tiles have evolved to give the appearance of an authentic wooden floor compared with real wood and wood laminates from a practicality point of view wood look tiles are superior. Their durability, fade resistance to harsh New Zealand sun and overall ability to cope with everything from high heels to children and animals makes them a popular choice for both new builds and renovations.”

John says wood-look plank tiles are so popular they currently make up a third of all tile sales out of Italy according to his suppliers. “We have seen a significant lift in this look as Kiwis love their indoor/outdoor entertaining, especially at the beach house.”

Concrete goes clean

While concrete look tiles have been a popular choice for the past decade, the latest trend means the concrete tile has changed to a much less detailed look.

“We’re seeing a ‘clean’ concrete being used, without all the exposed aggregates in it,” says John.

This look is often seen now in a matte texture and is driven by the trend for seeing and feeling the tactile nature of raw materials, as pictured above. Combinations of clean concrete with marble or wood look tiles give an interesting take on industrial with classic natural products.

Confidence to mix and match

One of 2018's trends is consumers and designers are having fun with colour, texture, and format combinations – they’re no longer scared to mix it up and create their own look.

“We’re seeing a lot more people who are trying to make their tiling look interesting. That’s really important because when you’re paying top dollar for your house you don’t want your house to look the same as every other house on the street.”

People are making their homes into a work of art by using different combinations, says John, and it’s a way of elevating a look without elevating the budget.

“You don’t have to buy Italian to make it look expensive, but it does help; the right selection of tiles will give you that ‘wow’ factor. European suppliers give direction and flair. Smart selections with guidance from designers and architects or a good eye is what transforms a space from ‘nice’ to ‘impressive’. If you’re not polarising people you’re boring people, after all not everyone likes art by Andy Warhol, right?”

And that’s what’s currently being done with tiles: “we’re juxtaposing different textures, colours and formats, but the key is not to overdo it.”

 

Want to know more about how to combine tiles for a high-end look? Be sure to visit MC Tiles on ArchiPro today or drop into one of their Auckland showrooms to learn more.

 

Waterfront by Leonardo   
Waterfront by Leonardo   

MC Tiles

MC Tiles and Distribution Ltd is a New Zealand owned and operated tile importer, retailer, and distributor. Comprised of two retail outlets, an importation division, and...

Recommended reading
Done tagging
Full screen
The latest trends in tiles

The latest trends in tiles

Tile trends tend to mirror interior design fashions and they can come and go just as quickly. We spoke to MC Tiles’ John Ryan about some of the trends coming from Europe and how your tile choices can be put together to create a look that won’t date.

Words by ArchiPro Editorial Team

Tile trends tend to mirror interior design fashions and they can come and go just as quickly. We spoke to MC Tiles’ John Ryan about some of the trends coming from Europe and how your tile choices can be put together to create a look that won’t date.

Large format mixes with small format

Large format is a trend that is becoming more and more popular because it works with the minimalist aesthetic that is currently trending in interiors.

Larger sized tiles, mean less grout lines and less distraction on the eye, says MC Tiles’ John Ryan, and big slabs are commonly being used as feature walls. “But the utilisation of combinations of sizes is becoming popular, as opposed to simply using one format of tile in a space.”

Slash by Imola
Slash by Imola

This look allows tiles from different price points to be used together to create a high-end look. In the large format John says statuario marble is a classic look and still very popular. This comes in a format as large as 3.2 metres by 1.6 metresand when used in feature spaces such as entranceways it can create a jaw-dropping effect.

Another more modern aesthetic gaining in popularity is large format industrial Corten steel-look tiles, popularly used on fireplaces, splashbacks and as feature walls in bathrooms.

Rectified, large format tiles give a clean look to a space, says John.

“Rectified tiles have a square edge, non-rectified have a cushioned or rolled edge. Cushioned edges require a wider grout line in between tiles. Rectified tiles allow for a tight minimalist grout line”

Colour “SLASH”

Colour is big right now in the tile world, and as such MC Tiles has brought in ‘SLASH’ from Italy – it’s a whole spectrum of coloured subway tiles ideal for feature walls or anywhere where a ‘pop’ of colour is desired.

“We’ve been starved of colour for such a long time, so we’ve brought in the whole colour palette. It includes a bright yellow and a bright green and a red, but also nice classic neutral tones.”

The beauty of it is there’s a textured and a plain option in each colour of the SLASH range so clients can satisfy their desire for a tactile surface while using colour. As they are a subway style tile, they can be laid vertically as a point of difference or in a herringbone format, which really gives a wow factor when combined with the colour, for feature walls and splashbacks.

Greenwood by rondine  
Greenwood by rondine  

Looking Natural

Textures inspired by nature have been big in interiors for the past couple of years, with warm, sandy tones taking the place of cooler neutrals. This has been mirrored in the tile world, and the ‘faux’-look wood tiles have come on in leaps and bounds from when the trend first surfaced, making them the go-to look for many designers and homeowners.

“Wood-look tiles have evolved to give the appearance of an authentic wooden floor compared with real wood and wood laminates from a practicality point of view wood look tiles are superior. Their durability, fade resistance to harsh New Zealand sun and overall ability to cope with everything from high heels to children and animals makes them a popular choice for both new builds and renovations.”

John says wood-look plank tiles are so popular they currently make up a third of all tile sales out of Italy according to his suppliers. “We have seen a significant lift in this look as Kiwis love their indoor/outdoor entertaining, especially at the beach house.”

Concrete goes clean

While concrete look tiles have been a popular choice for the past decade, the latest trend means the concrete tile has changed to a much less detailed look.

“We’re seeing a ‘clean’ concrete being used, without all the exposed aggregates in it,” says John.

This look is often seen now in a matte texture and is driven by the trend for seeing and feeling the tactile nature of raw materials, as pictured above. Combinations of clean concrete with marble or wood look tiles give an interesting take on industrial with classic natural products.

Confidence to mix and match

One of 2018's trends is consumers and designers are having fun with colour, texture, and format combinations – they’re no longer scared to mix it up and create their own look.

“We’re seeing a lot more people who are trying to make their tiling look interesting. That’s really important because when you’re paying top dollar for your house you don’t want your house to look the same as every other house on the street.”

People are making their homes into a work of art by using different combinations, says John, and it’s a way of elevating a look without elevating the budget.

“You don’t have to buy Italian to make it look expensive, but it does help; the right selection of tiles will give you that ‘wow’ factor. European suppliers give direction and flair. Smart selections with guidance from designers and architects or a good eye is what transforms a space from ‘nice’ to ‘impressive’. If you’re not polarising people you’re boring people, after all not everyone likes art by Andy Warhol, right?”

And that’s what’s currently being done with tiles: “we’re juxtaposing different textures, colours and formats, but the key is not to overdo it.”

 

Want to know more about how to combine tiles for a high-end look? Be sure to visit MC Tiles on ArchiPro today or drop into one of their Auckland showrooms to learn more.

 

Waterfront by Leonardo   
Waterfront by Leonardo   

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