Decking ideas for summer living

Decking ideas for summer living

We take a fresh look at the latest trends for decking outdoor spaces. Whether you’re building a porch, an outdoor room, a pool surround, a courtyard or a rooftop terrace, we explore some of the coolest and latest deckings that will take your outside areas into the 2020s.

Words by ArchiPro

Kiwi living is increasingly focussed around entertaining and lounging within outdoor spaces, with outside heaters and fire pits adding warmth, and walls with large, expansive glazing and slim-profiled sliding doors opening up houses to the outside elements like never before. 

Our summer lifestyle has never lasted so long and, as a result, there is an even greater array of new products on the market, including an amazing selection of different decking materials. 

Traditional materials like timber and concrete continue to be popular decking surfaces, mainly due to their proven durability and style; however, stone, brick and decorative tiles are on the rise again and work equally well in traditional Kiwi villas as well as with many of the current design trends. 

Meanwhile, some of the latest products on the market are making us rethink how we can transform our outdoor spaces, including some traditional materials that have been reinvented for sustainability. 

Wanaka House by RTA Studio features an outdoor terrace in natural local basalt, which is fitting within the surrounding mountain landscape and provides a contrast to the timber interior of the home. Photograph by Patrick Reynolds.
Wanaka House by RTA Studio features an outdoor terrace in natural local basalt, which is fitting within the surrounding mountain landscape and provides a contrast to the timber interior of the home. Photograph by Patrick Reynolds.

Stone patterns and textures add a sense of luxury and quality to any outdoor surface

These days, many Kiwis are keen for their homes to have a direct relationship with New Zealand’s unique rocky volcanic and coastal landscapes. Beautiful stone products for paving courtyards, pools and decks can be sourced around the world; however local stones, like South Island basalt, are becoming increasingly popular as consumers seek out materials that possess unusual organic patterns and textures in keeping with the natural environment.

Designed by Herbst Architects, Lantern House on Waiheke Island and utilises gunmetal grey herringbone-patterned tiling that flows from the interior to the exterior spaces and complements other tiled surfaces. Photograph by Jackie Meiring.
Designed by Herbst Architects, Lantern House on Waiheke Island and utilises gunmetal grey herringbone-patterned tiling that flows from the interior to the exterior spaces and complements other tiled surfaces. Photograph by Jackie Meiring.

Mosaic tiling works beautifully in traditional villas and with contemporary design styles

Patterned mosaic tiles are a growing trend because, typically, they add colour, playfulness and personality into outdoor spaces, and they work equally well in traditional villas as well in most contemporary styles of décor, such as this modern Japanese aesthetic. They work particularly well in outdoor bathing areas and, of course, around swimming pools, especially the new metallic-look tiling products that reflect the water, creating dancing patterns throughout wet spaces.

Colourful mosaic tiles are commonly seen in some of the mid-century Central/South American styles of décor, where large pot plants and modern furniture in natural materials are enlivened by splashes of pattern in tiling, furniture and furnishings. As well as being robust, if the quality is good, they're also relatively easy to replace if you fancy a change at a later date.

Sited on a hilltop, Roto-O-Rangi Farmhouse by PAUA Architects matches the polished concrete floor of the courtyard with a view of the expansive grassy landscape and contemporary concrete blackwork supports.
Sited on a hilltop, Roto-O-Rangi Farmhouse by PAUA Architects matches the polished concrete floor of the courtyard with a view of the expansive grassy landscape and contemporary concrete blackwork supports.

Making concrete fun again

Polished concretes are hugely popular, due to being a robust, timeless, cost-effective and low-maintenance choice for underfoot and a sleek surface that marries well with flat expanses of grass in the landscape. But, homeowners are no longer content with standard grey concrete surfaces, so the latest concretes have being brought up-to-date with embedded materials, such as locally sourced pebbles, stains and, even, glitter effects.

Millboard is a pre-finished composite decking made from mineral fibres reinforced with fibre glass, with a highly durable coating that makes it perfect around pool areas, deck, roof gardens and, even, on bridges and pontoons.
Millboard is a pre-finished composite decking made from mineral fibres reinforced with fibre glass, with a highly durable coating that makes it perfect around pool areas, deck, roof gardens and, even, on bridges and pontoons.

New materials transforming the decking landscape

One of the latest products in the world of decking is a product made from a composite material of reclaimed pine wood waste – a by-product of the timber trade – and recycled plastic milk containers. It typicallly has the uncanny resemblance of timber and stone.

One example is Forté Flooring’s Millboard in Brushed Basalt, a painted wood-look decking board that helps create seamless transitions between indoor and outdoor spaces. Millboard is made from mineral fibres reinforced with fibre glass, with an exterior coating of a resilient polyurethane called Lastane® that has the highest anti-slip rating in the UK so, even when wet, the material won’t rot, warp, fade or splinter, making it entirely suitable for pool areas that endure hot sun and chlorinated water.

These Ergon Tiles by Corten have the distinctive appearance of naturally weathered rusted iron, which is particularly fitting within New Zealand's rural landscape and can be used as decking and for interior spaces.
These Ergon Tiles by Corten have the distinctive appearance of naturally weathered rusted iron, which is particularly fitting within New Zealand's rural landscape and can be used as decking and for interior spaces.

Distinctive metallic-look decking

In keeping with the fashion for metalllics in the home, there are now a number of porcelain tiles on the market that give the appearance of metal, particularly Corten steel, a distinctive material that’s often used in new high-end homes. Its unique rusty metal surface is highly durable and the rustic colour works well in the New Zealand landscape.

MC Tiles stocks the Ergon Tiles range of metallic surface options, which includes a naturally weathered, rusted iron ‘Corten steel’ style finish, timeworn sheet metal, and flame-marked rolled iron. 

Volcano House in Devonport by RB Studio is a showcase for beautiful ancient timbers recovered from the bottom of New Zealand's rivers, including this stunning totara decking product.
Volcano House in Devonport by RB Studio is a showcase for beautiful ancient timbers recovered from the bottom of New Zealand's rivers, including this stunning totara decking product.

Sustainable decking for health and a happy environment

Many modern decking materials are now using organic timber preservative systems as consumers demand more environmentally friendly alternatives to traditional chemical wood treatments, which can pot entially leach chemicals into the soil and affect the health of workers who are processing the timbers. 

While timber is generally seen as the most sustainable option for decking, both composite timber and bamboo decking are newcomers to the eco decking market, with the former often manufactured with repurposed recycled material. Bamboo is known as one of the most renewable crops due to its ability to be harvested at maturity in just five years. As decking, it offers a durable option.  

Companies like New Zealand Riverwood are recovering ancient native timbers out of rivers. Between 100 and 150 years ago, logs were floated down from the forests to be processed in sawmills but some of them sank during the journey. They now represent the only significant supply of timber that remains from New Zealand's old growth native forests, and recovered totara decking provides a beautiful and characterful timber alternative to locally forested timbers like pine and macrocarpa.

Located in Queenstown, this Closeburn House features cedar decking, cladding and soffits throughout which utilise Dryden wood oils that are suitable for protecting both interior and exterior timbers.
Located in Queenstown, this Closeburn House features cedar decking, cladding and soffits throughout which utilise Dryden wood oils that are suitable for protecting both interior and exterior timbers.

Take the inside outside

Many companies provide ‘twin’ products that match both the inside and outside environments, so it is easier than ever to use the same or similar materials to create a seamless flow throughout the home. 

Dryden WoodOil has a range of timber treatments with exterior and interior products in matching colours to ensure that timber flooring can be continued in the same colour and finish to the decking. 

Similarly, stone paving from the interior can be utilised outside, perhaps with a slightly rougher surface texture.

This modern triangular-formed house by Chris Tate is complemented by a triangle shaped timber deck that, secluded within the bush, is perfect for summer parties, while a black picket fence is a humorous homage to the fencing around classic Kiwi villas.
This modern triangular-formed house by Chris Tate is complemented by a triangle shaped timber deck that, secluded within the bush, is perfect for summer parties, while a black picket fence is a humorous homage to the fencing around classic Kiwi villas.

5 key preparation tips to creating a successful deck

To achieve an amazing result when planning your outdoor areas, it's crucial to create a brief, whether it be for the architect, landscape architect or your own DIY decking project. 

1. How much through traffic – wear and tear – will the deck receive?

2. Is there pipework underneath the planned site that may need access at a later date?

3. If the deck is not already part of a new build, do you have planning consent for additional structures added to the home?

4. Does the design and material of your deck complement the style of your home and will different outdoor areas require a variety of surface materials that work well together?

5. What furniture and objects will be placed on the deck and what kind of support and surface do they require to sit well?

Top banner image: Little Roads House by Pattersons is surrounded by decking overlooking an infinity-edged reflection lake with sculptural hillocks behind, forming a foreground to the surrounding Wakatipu landscape.

These colourful Graphica tiles from The Tile Depot combine 16 different graphic designs to create a stunning patchwork floor that suits both modern and traditional homes.
These colourful Graphica tiles from The Tile Depot combine 16 different graphic designs to create a stunning patchwork floor that suits both modern and traditional homes.

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Decking ideas for summer living
Decking ideas for summer living

Decking ideas for summer living

We take a fresh look at the latest trends for decking outdoor spaces. Whether you’re building a porch, an outdoor room, a pool surround, a courtyard or a rooftop terrace, we explore some of the coolest and latest deckings that will take your outside areas into the 2020s.

Words by ArchiPro

Kiwi living is increasingly focussed around entertaining and lounging within outdoor spaces, with outside heaters and fire pits adding warmth, and walls with large, expansive glazing and slim-profiled sliding doors opening up houses to the outside elements like never before. 

Our summer lifestyle has never lasted so long and, as a result, there is an even greater array of new products on the market, including an amazing selection of different decking materials. 

Traditional materials like timber and concrete continue to be popular decking surfaces, mainly due to their proven durability and style; however, stone, brick and decorative tiles are on the rise again and work equally well in traditional Kiwi villas as well as with many of the current design trends. 

Meanwhile, some of the latest products on the market are making us rethink how we can transform our outdoor spaces, including some traditional materials that have been reinvented for sustainability. 

Wanaka House by RTA Studio features an outdoor terrace in natural local basalt, which is fitting within the surrounding mountain landscape and provides a contrast to the timber interior of the home. Photograph by Patrick Reynolds.
Wanaka House by RTA Studio features an outdoor terrace in natural local basalt, which is fitting within the surrounding mountain landscape and provides a contrast to the timber interior of the home. Photograph by Patrick Reynolds.

Stone patterns and textures add a sense of luxury and quality to any outdoor surface

These days, many Kiwis are keen for their homes to have a direct relationship with New Zealand’s unique rocky volcanic and coastal landscapes. Beautiful stone products for paving courtyards, pools and decks can be sourced around the world; however local stones, like South Island basalt, are becoming increasingly popular as consumers seek out materials that possess unusual organic patterns and textures in keeping with the natural environment.

Designed by Herbst Architects, Lantern House on Waiheke Island and utilises gunmetal grey herringbone-patterned tiling that flows from the interior to the exterior spaces and complements other tiled surfaces. Photograph by Jackie Meiring.
Designed by Herbst Architects, Lantern House on Waiheke Island and utilises gunmetal grey herringbone-patterned tiling that flows from the interior to the exterior spaces and complements other tiled surfaces. Photograph by Jackie Meiring.

Mosaic tiling works beautifully in traditional villas and with contemporary design styles

Patterned mosaic tiles are a growing trend because, typically, they add colour, playfulness and personality into outdoor spaces, and they work equally well in traditional villas as well in most contemporary styles of décor, such as this modern Japanese aesthetic. They work particularly well in outdoor bathing areas and, of course, around swimming pools, especially the new metallic-look tiling products that reflect the water, creating dancing patterns throughout wet spaces.

Colourful mosaic tiles are commonly seen in some of the mid-century Central/South American styles of décor, where large pot plants and modern furniture in natural materials are enlivened by splashes of pattern in tiling, furniture and furnishings. As well as being robust, if the quality is good, they're also relatively easy to replace if you fancy a change at a later date.

Sited on a hilltop, Roto-O-Rangi Farmhouse by PAUA Architects matches the polished concrete floor of the courtyard with a view of the expansive grassy landscape and contemporary concrete blackwork supports.
Sited on a hilltop, Roto-O-Rangi Farmhouse by PAUA Architects matches the polished concrete floor of the courtyard with a view of the expansive grassy landscape and contemporary concrete blackwork supports.

Making concrete fun again

Polished concretes are hugely popular, due to being a robust, timeless, cost-effective and low-maintenance choice for underfoot and a sleek surface that marries well with flat expanses of grass in the landscape. But, homeowners are no longer content with standard grey concrete surfaces, so the latest concretes have being brought up-to-date with embedded materials, such as locally sourced pebbles, stains and, even, glitter effects.

Millboard is a pre-finished composite decking made from mineral fibres reinforced with fibre glass, with a highly durable coating that makes it perfect around pool areas, deck, roof gardens and, even, on bridges and pontoons.
Millboard is a pre-finished composite decking made from mineral fibres reinforced with fibre glass, with a highly durable coating that makes it perfect around pool areas, deck, roof gardens and, even, on bridges and pontoons.

New materials transforming the decking landscape

One of the latest products in the world of decking is a product made from a composite material of reclaimed pine wood waste – a by-product of the timber trade – and recycled plastic milk containers. It typicallly has the uncanny resemblance of timber and stone.

One example is Forté Flooring’s Millboard in Brushed Basalt, a painted wood-look decking board that helps create seamless transitions between indoor and outdoor spaces. Millboard is made from mineral fibres reinforced with fibre glass, with an exterior coating of a resilient polyurethane called Lastane® that has the highest anti-slip rating in the UK so, even when wet, the material won’t rot, warp, fade or splinter, making it entirely suitable for pool areas that endure hot sun and chlorinated water.

These Ergon Tiles by Corten have the distinctive appearance of naturally weathered rusted iron, which is particularly fitting within New Zealand's rural landscape and can be used as decking and for interior spaces.
These Ergon Tiles by Corten have the distinctive appearance of naturally weathered rusted iron, which is particularly fitting within New Zealand's rural landscape and can be used as decking and for interior spaces.

Distinctive metallic-look decking

In keeping with the fashion for metalllics in the home, there are now a number of porcelain tiles on the market that give the appearance of metal, particularly Corten steel, a distinctive material that’s often used in new high-end homes. Its unique rusty metal surface is highly durable and the rustic colour works well in the New Zealand landscape.

MC Tiles stocks the Ergon Tiles range of metallic surface options, which includes a naturally weathered, rusted iron ‘Corten steel’ style finish, timeworn sheet metal, and flame-marked rolled iron. 

Volcano House in Devonport by RB Studio is a showcase for beautiful ancient timbers recovered from the bottom of New Zealand's rivers, including this stunning totara decking product.
Volcano House in Devonport by RB Studio is a showcase for beautiful ancient timbers recovered from the bottom of New Zealand's rivers, including this stunning totara decking product.

Sustainable decking for health and a happy environment

Many modern decking materials are now using organic timber preservative systems as consumers demand more environmentally friendly alternatives to traditional chemical wood treatments, which can pot entially leach chemicals into the soil and affect the health of workers who are processing the timbers. 

While timber is generally seen as the most sustainable option for decking, both composite timber and bamboo decking are newcomers to the eco decking market, with the former often manufactured with repurposed recycled material. Bamboo is known as one of the most renewable crops due to its ability to be harvested at maturity in just five years. As decking, it offers a durable option.  

Companies like New Zealand Riverwood are recovering ancient native timbers out of rivers. Between 100 and 150 years ago, logs were floated down from the forests to be processed in sawmills but some of them sank during the journey. They now represent the only significant supply of timber that remains from New Zealand's old growth native forests, and recovered totara decking provides a beautiful and characterful timber alternative to locally forested timbers like pine and macrocarpa.

Located in Queenstown, this Closeburn House features cedar decking, cladding and soffits throughout which utilise Dryden wood oils that are suitable for protecting both interior and exterior timbers.
Located in Queenstown, this Closeburn House features cedar decking, cladding and soffits throughout which utilise Dryden wood oils that are suitable for protecting both interior and exterior timbers.

Take the inside outside

Many companies provide ‘twin’ products that match both the inside and outside environments, so it is easier than ever to use the same or similar materials to create a seamless flow throughout the home. 

Dryden WoodOil has a range of timber treatments with exterior and interior products in matching colours to ensure that timber flooring can be continued in the same colour and finish to the decking. 

Similarly, stone paving from the interior can be utilised outside, perhaps with a slightly rougher surface texture.

This modern triangular-formed house by Chris Tate is complemented by a triangle shaped timber deck that, secluded within the bush, is perfect for summer parties, while a black picket fence is a humorous homage to the fencing around classic Kiwi villas.
This modern triangular-formed house by Chris Tate is complemented by a triangle shaped timber deck that, secluded within the bush, is perfect for summer parties, while a black picket fence is a humorous homage to the fencing around classic Kiwi villas.

5 key preparation tips to creating a successful deck

To achieve an amazing result when planning your outdoor areas, it's crucial to create a brief, whether it be for the architect, landscape architect or your own DIY decking project. 

1. How much through traffic – wear and tear – will the deck receive?

2. Is there pipework underneath the planned site that may need access at a later date?

3. If the deck is not already part of a new build, do you have planning consent for additional structures added to the home?

4. Does the design and material of your deck complement the style of your home and will different outdoor areas require a variety of surface materials that work well together?

5. What furniture and objects will be placed on the deck and what kind of support and surface do they require to sit well?

Top banner image: Little Roads House by Pattersons is surrounded by decking overlooking an infinity-edged reflection lake with sculptural hillocks behind, forming a foreground to the surrounding Wakatipu landscape.

These colourful Graphica tiles from The Tile Depot combine 16 different graphic designs to create a stunning patchwork floor that suits both modern and traditional homes.
These colourful Graphica tiles from The Tile Depot combine 16 different graphic designs to create a stunning patchwork floor that suits both modern and traditional homes.

ArchiPro

ArchiPro is the place where beautifully designed spaces begin

Recommended reading
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Decking ideas for summer living

Decking ideas for summer living

We take a fresh look at the latest trends for decking outdoor spaces. Whether you’re building a porch, an outdoor room, a pool surround, a courtyard or a rooftop terrace, we explore some of the coolest and latest deckings that will take your outside areas into the 2020s.

Words by ArchiPro

Kiwi living is increasingly focussed around entertaining and lounging within outdoor spaces, with outside heaters and fire pits adding warmth, and walls with large, expansive glazing and slim-profiled sliding doors opening up houses to the outside elements like never before. 

Our summer lifestyle has never lasted so long and, as a result, there is an even greater array of new products on the market, including an amazing selection of different decking materials. 

Traditional materials like timber and concrete continue to be popular decking surfaces, mainly due to their proven durability and style; however, stone, brick and decorative tiles are on the rise again and work equally well in traditional Kiwi villas as well as with many of the current design trends. 

Meanwhile, some of the latest products on the market are making us rethink how we can transform our outdoor spaces, including some traditional materials that have been reinvented for sustainability. 

Wanaka House by RTA Studio features an outdoor terrace in natural local basalt, which is fitting within the surrounding mountain landscape and provides a contrast to the timber interior of the home. Photograph by Patrick Reynolds.
Wanaka House by RTA Studio features an outdoor terrace in natural local basalt, which is fitting within the surrounding mountain landscape and provides a contrast to the timber interior of the home. Photograph by Patrick Reynolds.

Stone patterns and textures add a sense of luxury and quality to any outdoor surface

These days, many Kiwis are keen for their homes to have a direct relationship with New Zealand’s unique rocky volcanic and coastal landscapes. Beautiful stone products for paving courtyards, pools and decks can be sourced around the world; however local stones, like South Island basalt, are becoming increasingly popular as consumers seek out materials that possess unusual organic patterns and textures in keeping with the natural environment.

Designed by Herbst Architects, Lantern House on Waiheke Island and utilises gunmetal grey herringbone-patterned tiling that flows from the interior to the exterior spaces and complements other tiled surfaces. Photograph by Jackie Meiring.
Designed by Herbst Architects, Lantern House on Waiheke Island and utilises gunmetal grey herringbone-patterned tiling that flows from the interior to the exterior spaces and complements other tiled surfaces. Photograph by Jackie Meiring.

Mosaic tiling works beautifully in traditional villas and with contemporary design styles

Patterned mosaic tiles are a growing trend because, typically, they add colour, playfulness and personality into outdoor spaces, and they work equally well in traditional villas as well in most contemporary styles of décor, such as this modern Japanese aesthetic. They work particularly well in outdoor bathing areas and, of course, around swimming pools, especially the new metallic-look tiling products that reflect the water, creating dancing patterns throughout wet spaces.

Colourful mosaic tiles are commonly seen in some of the mid-century Central/South American styles of décor, where large pot plants and modern furniture in natural materials are enlivened by splashes of pattern in tiling, furniture and furnishings. As well as being robust, if the quality is good, they're also relatively easy to replace if you fancy a change at a later date.

Sited on a hilltop, Roto-O-Rangi Farmhouse by PAUA Architects matches the polished concrete floor of the courtyard with a view of the expansive grassy landscape and contemporary concrete blackwork supports.
Sited on a hilltop, Roto-O-Rangi Farmhouse by PAUA Architects matches the polished concrete floor of the courtyard with a view of the expansive grassy landscape and contemporary concrete blackwork supports.

Making concrete fun again

Polished concretes are hugely popular, due to being a robust, timeless, cost-effective and low-maintenance choice for underfoot and a sleek surface that marries well with flat expanses of grass in the landscape. But, homeowners are no longer content with standard grey concrete surfaces, so the latest concretes have being brought up-to-date with embedded materials, such as locally sourced pebbles, stains and, even, glitter effects.

Millboard is a pre-finished composite decking made from mineral fibres reinforced with fibre glass, with a highly durable coating that makes it perfect around pool areas, deck, roof gardens and, even, on bridges and pontoons.
Millboard is a pre-finished composite decking made from mineral fibres reinforced with fibre glass, with a highly durable coating that makes it perfect around pool areas, deck, roof gardens and, even, on bridges and pontoons.

New materials transforming the decking landscape

One of the latest products in the world of decking is a product made from a composite material of reclaimed pine wood waste – a by-product of the timber trade – and recycled plastic milk containers. It typicallly has the uncanny resemblance of timber and stone.

One example is Forté Flooring’s Millboard in Brushed Basalt, a painted wood-look decking board that helps create seamless transitions between indoor and outdoor spaces. Millboard is made from mineral fibres reinforced with fibre glass, with an exterior coating of a resilient polyurethane called Lastane® that has the highest anti-slip rating in the UK so, even when wet, the material won’t rot, warp, fade or splinter, making it entirely suitable for pool areas that endure hot sun and chlorinated water.

These Ergon Tiles by Corten have the distinctive appearance of naturally weathered rusted iron, which is particularly fitting within New Zealand's rural landscape and can be used as decking and for interior spaces.
These Ergon Tiles by Corten have the distinctive appearance of naturally weathered rusted iron, which is particularly fitting within New Zealand's rural landscape and can be used as decking and for interior spaces.

Distinctive metallic-look decking

In keeping with the fashion for metalllics in the home, there are now a number of porcelain tiles on the market that give the appearance of metal, particularly Corten steel, a distinctive material that’s often used in new high-end homes. Its unique rusty metal surface is highly durable and the rustic colour works well in the New Zealand landscape.

MC Tiles stocks the Ergon Tiles range of metallic surface options, which includes a naturally weathered, rusted iron ‘Corten steel’ style finish, timeworn sheet metal, and flame-marked rolled iron. 

Volcano House in Devonport by RB Studio is a showcase for beautiful ancient timbers recovered from the bottom of New Zealand's rivers, including this stunning totara decking product.
Volcano House in Devonport by RB Studio is a showcase for beautiful ancient timbers recovered from the bottom of New Zealand's rivers, including this stunning totara decking product.

Sustainable decking for health and a happy environment

Many modern decking materials are now using organic timber preservative systems as consumers demand more environmentally friendly alternatives to traditional chemical wood treatments, which can pot entially leach chemicals into the soil and affect the health of workers who are processing the timbers. 

While timber is generally seen as the most sustainable option for decking, both composite timber and bamboo decking are newcomers to the eco decking market, with the former often manufactured with repurposed recycled material. Bamboo is known as one of the most renewable crops due to its ability to be harvested at maturity in just five years. As decking, it offers a durable option.  

Companies like New Zealand Riverwood are recovering ancient native timbers out of rivers. Between 100 and 150 years ago, logs were floated down from the forests to be processed in sawmills but some of them sank during the journey. They now represent the only significant supply of timber that remains from New Zealand's old growth native forests, and recovered totara decking provides a beautiful and characterful timber alternative to locally forested timbers like pine and macrocarpa.

Located in Queenstown, this Closeburn House features cedar decking, cladding and soffits throughout which utilise Dryden wood oils that are suitable for protecting both interior and exterior timbers.
Located in Queenstown, this Closeburn House features cedar decking, cladding and soffits throughout which utilise Dryden wood oils that are suitable for protecting both interior and exterior timbers.

Take the inside outside

Many companies provide ‘twin’ products that match both the inside and outside environments, so it is easier than ever to use the same or similar materials to create a seamless flow throughout the home. 

Dryden WoodOil has a range of timber treatments with exterior and interior products in matching colours to ensure that timber flooring can be continued in the same colour and finish to the decking. 

Similarly, stone paving from the interior can be utilised outside, perhaps with a slightly rougher surface texture.

This modern triangular-formed house by Chris Tate is complemented by a triangle shaped timber deck that, secluded within the bush, is perfect for summer parties, while a black picket fence is a humorous homage to the fencing around classic Kiwi villas.
This modern triangular-formed house by Chris Tate is complemented by a triangle shaped timber deck that, secluded within the bush, is perfect for summer parties, while a black picket fence is a humorous homage to the fencing around classic Kiwi villas.

5 key preparation tips to creating a successful deck

To achieve an amazing result when planning your outdoor areas, it's crucial to create a brief, whether it be for the architect, landscape architect or your own DIY decking project. 

1. How much through traffic – wear and tear – will the deck receive?

2. Is there pipework underneath the planned site that may need access at a later date?

3. If the deck is not already part of a new build, do you have planning consent for additional structures added to the home?

4. Does the design and material of your deck complement the style of your home and will different outdoor areas require a variety of surface materials that work well together?

5. What furniture and objects will be placed on the deck and what kind of support and surface do they require to sit well?

Top banner image: Little Roads House by Pattersons is surrounded by decking overlooking an infinity-edged reflection lake with sculptural hillocks behind, forming a foreground to the surrounding Wakatipu landscape.

These colourful Graphica tiles from The Tile Depot combine 16 different graphic designs to create a stunning patchwork floor that suits both modern and traditional homes.
These colourful Graphica tiles from The Tile Depot combine 16 different graphic designs to create a stunning patchwork floor that suits both modern and traditional homes.

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