Intro Text (will show in Directory only):

It’s a material that’s been used in European streets for hundreds of years, but its introduction into New Zealand is much more recent. Now we are discovering the importance of the longevity and hardiness of the natural material, stone. Particularly in the urban realm, where people gather to eat and walk the central cities, it’s a tactile, beautiful material with a sense of character and it will stand the test of time.

This is none so important than in central Christchurch, where the material is being used extensively to re-develop the public spaces, establishing a sense of permanence the city craves.

Otakaro was set up to up to deliver 13 anchor projects for the rebuild of Christchurch and they have partnered with Designsource to deliver extensive stone streetscapes and stone artwork in the City Centre.

The stone paving and artworks will take pedestrians on a journey from Victoria Square right round through the Convention Centre and to the River Avon Precinct, a three-kilometre promenade that follows alongside the River Avon.    

It’s a material that’s been used in European streets for hundreds of years, but its introduction into New Zealand is much more recent. Now we are discovering the importance of the longevity and hardiness of the natural material, stone. Particularly in the urban realm, where people gather to eat and walk the central cities, it’s a tactile, beautiful material with a sense of character and it will stand the test of time.

This is none so important than in central Christchurch, where the material is being used extensively to re-develop the public spaces, establishing a sense of permanence the city craves.

Otakaro was set up to up to deliver 13 anchor projects for the rebuild of Christchurch and they have partnered with Designsource to deliver extensive stone streetscapes and stone artwork in the City Centre.

The stone paving and artworks will take pedestrians on a journey from Victoria Square right round through the Convention Centre and to the River Avon Precinct, a three-kilometre promenade that follows alongside the River Avon.    

Photo Spot 1

Upload Image

Drag and Drop or Click to Upload Image

“It will draw people back to the old Garden City as it should be,” says Designsource’s Sue Holmes.

The project encompasses stone walkways, outdoor terraces, artworks and stone sculptures, poems etched into the pavement and 13 Whāriki “welcome mats” designed from patterned and textured stone and placed throughout the city.

Sue says Christchurch’s investment in stone not only feels permanent, it is.

“It’ll be there for hundreds of years – it’s all about the longevity, like pretty much all of Europe you walk through these beautiful cobbled streets and nothing has changed for hundreds of years.”

“It will draw people back to the old Garden City as it should be,” says Designsource’s Sue Holmes.

The project encompasses stone walkways, outdoor terraces, artworks and stone sculptures, poems etched into the pavement and 13 Whāriki “welcome mats” designed from patterned and textured stone and placed throughout the city.

Sue says Christchurch’s investment in stone not only feels permanent, it is.

“It’ll be there for hundreds of years – it’s all about the longevity, like pretty much all of Europe you walk through these beautiful cobbled streets and nothing has changed for hundreds of years.”

Designsource sources stone product from all over the world and for the River Avon Precinct project three different colours of basalt and granite were chosen as the volcanic rock is known for its hardiness and longevity. The material is used as paving, seating, cobbles, kerbs and channels and in different textures, particularly on the terraces that lead down to the river.

Designsource sources stone product from all over the world and for the River Avon Precinct project three different colours of basalt and granite were chosen as the volcanic rock is known for its hardiness and longevity. The material is used as paving, seating, cobbles, kerbs and channels and in different textures, particularly on the terraces that lead down to the river.

Photo Spot 2

Upload Image

Drag and Drop or Click to Upload Image

Photo Spot 3

Upload Image

Drag and Drop or Click to Upload Image

Of course, the beauty of stone is its versatility. For example, on the river walkway, a tactile delineation strip is formed into the stone so that sight-impaired visitors can run their cane along the strip to feel where the path begins and ends, rather than using the usual rubber yellow dotted surface. Kerbs and channels are also formed from stone rather than concrete, which degrades over time.

The granite is also used to form seating units and planters with chamfered and curved details; poems are etched onto the stone pavers and users can follow an ‘art walk’ that will be completed prior to Christmas, encompassing stone artworks and sculptures placed throughout the journey.

“The landscape is looking amazing,” says Sue. “They’ve certainly invested a lot in it and Christchurch needs to draw people back into the City and make it a lovely living space again.”

Other councils are realising the importance of investing in the public realm and city centres too and Designsource is leading the way; they created a permanent urban realm streetscapes in stone in the New Plymouth City Centre, using Melbourne Blue Stone.

In Auckland’s Britomart Designsource paired with leading designers to deliver beautiful urban spaces, freshening up the public realm and making it more accessible to use. They’ve also completed projects on Queen St, Fort Street, Lorne and Elliot Street in the CBD.

Sue says there’s a change in the way councils think when it comes to how cities use their centres and urban spaces.  

“What they’re trying to achieve is to eventually drive cars out of the areas to make them pedestrian only – so it’s a whole new concept really that’s proving to be really successful.”

With more councils getting on board with the concept, public realm spaces around the country will look be more beautiful and be accessible to use for many years to come.

 

Want to know more about investing for longevity in the urban realm? Be sure to visit Design Source on ArchiPro today or visit the Auckland showroom to learn more.

Of course, the beauty of stone is its versatility. For example, on the river walkway, a tactile delineation strip is formed into the stone so that sight-impaired visitors can run their cane along the strip to feel where the path begins and ends, rather than using the usual rubber yellow dotted surface. Kerbs and channels are also formed from stone rather than concrete, which degrades over time.

The granite is also used to form seating units and planters with chamfered and curved details; poems are etched onto the stone pavers and users can follow an ‘art walk’ that will be completed prior to Christmas, encompassing stone artworks and sculptures placed throughout the journey.

“The landscape is looking amazing,” says Sue. “They’ve certainly invested a lot in it and Christchurch needs to draw people back into the City and make it a lovely living space again.”

Other councils are realising the importance of investing in the public realm and city centres too and Designsource is leading the way; they created a permanent urban realm streetscapes in stone in the New Plymouth City Centre, using Melbourne Blue Stone.

In Auckland’s Britomart Designsource paired with leading designers to deliver beautiful urban spaces, freshening up the public realm and making it more accessible to use. They’ve also completed projects on Queen St, Fort Street, Lorne and Elliot Street in the CBD.

Sue says there’s a change in the way councils think when it comes to how cities use their centres and urban spaces.  

“What they’re trying to achieve is to eventually drive cars out of the areas to make them pedestrian only – so it’s a whole new concept really that’s proving to be really successful.”

With more councils getting on board with the concept, public realm spaces around the country will look be more beautiful and be accessible to use for many years to come.

 

Want to know more about investing for longevity in the urban realm? Be sure to visit Design Source on ArchiPro today or visit the Auckland showroom to learn more.

This article has not been published yet, but it's saved as a draft.
Great work! This article is live.
Your article is in queue to be approved by ArchiPro.
 

Set Categories

{{blogPost.data.Categories.length}} {{blogPost.data.Categories.length == 1 && 'Category' || 'Categories' }}

Set Published Date

{{blogPost.data.PublishDate * 1000 | date:"mediumDate"}}

Published & Live

Awaiting ArchiPro approval.

Not Published

Published Pending... Not Published

{{ blogPost.data.Activated=='1' && "Item Approved" || "Item requires Approval" }}

{{blogPost.data.Activated=='1' && 'Approved' || 'Not Approved' }}

{{ archipro.changes_saving==0 && "All changes saved." || "Saving changes..." }}

Saved! Saving...

Leave Edit Mode

Finish Editing

Delete Blog

Delete Blog

Enter Edit Mode

Edit Page