On the frontline

On the frontline

James and Sven Roskvist’s business is one of a handful of construction sector businesses providing essential services during the lockdown. Here’s their story.

Words by ArchiPro Editorial Team

Driving through empty streets to today’s job, Sven Roskvist was clad in overalls, gloves and a face mask. Despite the eerie quietness, the people he did see en route were overly friendly, waving from their homes or cars. 

For professionals undertaking essential services in the construction sector, it’s vital that safety comes first. And that’s exactly what the team at Titirangi Plumbing and Drainlaying are focused on at this time.

Like many other essential service providers, this family business led, by brothers James and Sven Roskvist is contending with an unprecedented situation. How do they ensure the safety of their staff, while ensuring those in the community have the essential services they need?

Today’s job was the first of what could be multiple jobs the Roskvist brothers expect to attend over the next few weeks.

“Jobs that fall into the category of what is considered essential services—those that are required to maintain human health and safety immediately—generally come up once or twice a week, so we expect this to continue pretty steadily over the lockdown period,” Sven says.

These jobs can include such things as the repair of failed hot water cylinders where that water is required for sanitation purposes, the unblocking and repair or replacement of sanitary waste pipes, water pipes and gas piping or fittings where there is an immediate threat to human health and safety.

“Today’s job fell under that category and included a blocked drain that had resulted in an overflowing gully trap, which meant human waste was flowing onto the street. These types of jobs are immediate requirements.”

Undertaking these jobs is a service the Roskvist brothers are happy to provide for the good of their community, but they come at a risk to their own health and that of their families.

“For this reason, we have clear and stringent protocols in place that include all staff wearing overalls, masks and gloves. We are also asking clients to ensure they leave their door open so we don't have to touch the same surfaces and that all interior surfaces in the area of concern are wiped down prior to us arriving. If we are undertaking a job inside a person’s home, then we ask that the occupants of that home stay at least two metres away, or wait in another room while we complete the job. 

“When we leave, we wipe down and sanitise all surfaces and then request that the homeowners do the same.”

Despite the obvious threats that come with providing services such as those the Roskvist brothers are providing at this time, there are some upsides. “From what I can see so far, this is a situation that will bring communities closer together. Driving to today’s job, people were waving, friendly and supportive. It was nice to see how a situation like this can bring people together, despite the isolation.”

For the Titirangi Plumbing and Drainlayers team, they ask that over the next four weeks, people think carefully before contacting them and ask that only those in their local area request essential services. “If people are unsure if it’s essential, it’s likely that it’s not, however we are here to help if anyone is unsure if their job falls under this category or not.”

Titirangi Plumbing and Drainage

Titirangi Plumbing & Drainlaying (TPDL) is a full-service plumbing and drainage company with over 40 years accumulated industry experience.      We specialise...

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On the frontline
On the frontline

On the frontline

James and Sven Roskvist’s business is one of a handful of construction sector businesses providing essential services during the lockdown. Here’s their story.

Words by ArchiPro Editorial Team

Driving through empty streets to today’s job, Sven Roskvist was clad in overalls, gloves and a face mask. Despite the eerie quietness, the people he did see en route were overly friendly, waving from their homes or cars. 

For professionals undertaking essential services in the construction sector, it’s vital that safety comes first. And that’s exactly what the team at Titirangi Plumbing and Drainlaying are focused on at this time.

Like many other essential service providers, this family business led, by brothers James and Sven Roskvist is contending with an unprecedented situation. How do they ensure the safety of their staff, while ensuring those in the community have the essential services they need?

Today’s job was the first of what could be multiple jobs the Roskvist brothers expect to attend over the next few weeks.

“Jobs that fall into the category of what is considered essential services—those that are required to maintain human health and safety immediately—generally come up once or twice a week, so we expect this to continue pretty steadily over the lockdown period,” Sven says.

These jobs can include such things as the repair of failed hot water cylinders where that water is required for sanitation purposes, the unblocking and repair or replacement of sanitary waste pipes, water pipes and gas piping or fittings where there is an immediate threat to human health and safety.

“Today’s job fell under that category and included a blocked drain that had resulted in an overflowing gully trap, which meant human waste was flowing onto the street. These types of jobs are immediate requirements.”

Undertaking these jobs is a service the Roskvist brothers are happy to provide for the good of their community, but they come at a risk to their own health and that of their families.

“For this reason, we have clear and stringent protocols in place that include all staff wearing overalls, masks and gloves. We are also asking clients to ensure they leave their door open so we don't have to touch the same surfaces and that all interior surfaces in the area of concern are wiped down prior to us arriving. If we are undertaking a job inside a person’s home, then we ask that the occupants of that home stay at least two metres away, or wait in another room while we complete the job. 

“When we leave, we wipe down and sanitise all surfaces and then request that the homeowners do the same.”

Despite the obvious threats that come with providing services such as those the Roskvist brothers are providing at this time, there are some upsides. “From what I can see so far, this is a situation that will bring communities closer together. Driving to today’s job, people were waving, friendly and supportive. It was nice to see how a situation like this can bring people together, despite the isolation.”

For the Titirangi Plumbing and Drainlayers team, they ask that over the next four weeks, people think carefully before contacting them and ask that only those in their local area request essential services. “If people are unsure if it’s essential, it’s likely that it’s not, however we are here to help if anyone is unsure if their job falls under this category or not.”

Titirangi Plumbing and Drainage

Titirangi Plumbing & Drainlaying (TPDL) is a full-service plumbing and drainage company with over 40 years accumulated industry experience.      We specialise...

Recommended reading
Done tagging
Full screen
On the frontline

On the frontline

James and Sven Roskvist’s business is one of a handful of construction sector businesses providing essential services during the lockdown. Here’s their story.

Words by ArchiPro Editorial Team

Driving through empty streets to today’s job, Sven Roskvist was clad in overalls, gloves and a face mask. Despite the eerie quietness, the people he did see en route were overly friendly, waving from their homes or cars. 

For professionals undertaking essential services in the construction sector, it’s vital that safety comes first. And that’s exactly what the team at Titirangi Plumbing and Drainlaying are focused on at this time.

Like many other essential service providers, this family business led, by brothers James and Sven Roskvist is contending with an unprecedented situation. How do they ensure the safety of their staff, while ensuring those in the community have the essential services they need?

Today’s job was the first of what could be multiple jobs the Roskvist brothers expect to attend over the next few weeks.

“Jobs that fall into the category of what is considered essential services—those that are required to maintain human health and safety immediately—generally come up once or twice a week, so we expect this to continue pretty steadily over the lockdown period,” Sven says.

These jobs can include such things as the repair of failed hot water cylinders where that water is required for sanitation purposes, the unblocking and repair or replacement of sanitary waste pipes, water pipes and gas piping or fittings where there is an immediate threat to human health and safety.

“Today’s job fell under that category and included a blocked drain that had resulted in an overflowing gully trap, which meant human waste was flowing onto the street. These types of jobs are immediate requirements.”

Undertaking these jobs is a service the Roskvist brothers are happy to provide for the good of their community, but they come at a risk to their own health and that of their families.

“For this reason, we have clear and stringent protocols in place that include all staff wearing overalls, masks and gloves. We are also asking clients to ensure they leave their door open so we don't have to touch the same surfaces and that all interior surfaces in the area of concern are wiped down prior to us arriving. If we are undertaking a job inside a person’s home, then we ask that the occupants of that home stay at least two metres away, or wait in another room while we complete the job. 

“When we leave, we wipe down and sanitise all surfaces and then request that the homeowners do the same.”

Despite the obvious threats that come with providing services such as those the Roskvist brothers are providing at this time, there are some upsides. “From what I can see so far, this is a situation that will bring communities closer together. Driving to today’s job, people were waving, friendly and supportive. It was nice to see how a situation like this can bring people together, despite the isolation.”

For the Titirangi Plumbing and Drainlayers team, they ask that over the next four weeks, people think carefully before contacting them and ask that only those in their local area request essential services. “If people are unsure if it’s essential, it’s likely that it’s not, however we are here to help if anyone is unsure if their job falls under this category or not.”

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