The Anti-villa

Website

What to do with a delipidated Victorian villa located on one of the strictest heritage conservation streets in all of Auckland? Local architecture practice Studio John Irving decided not to play it safe and ended up rebuilding the house from scratch, introducing a “rather unsympathetic addition” at the back that could almost be called an anti-villa.

Project architect John Irving says, “This is certainly a house of two halves, because, street-side, we had to retain its heritage character but, out the back and somewhat hidden away, we have introduced a sleek, minimal and highly modern addition.”

It was certainly time for an update for the old villa, which had been butchered over the years and had seen some ‘interesting’ additions, such as aluminium joinery, a filled-in veranda, the removal of the central hallway, and a Skyline garage tacked onto the side of it. The sad state of the house was further illustrated when the builders started to demolish it and the entire house completely fell apart.

John says that, while the brief from the clients was quite open, the main ideas were to keep all the living areas out the back in the addition, and the bedrooms and bathrooms located in the villa. “The clients wanted everything to be very contemporary – they were really in love with the idea of a minimal, modernist living pavilion that would set up a great juxtaposition between the traditional villa and the new addition.”

They also wanted garaging underneath the home, which meant that the entire house had to be raised up during construction to install a new double garage. While the house can still be entered via the front door, there’s now the option to drive in underneath and enter the home through the basement. This large subterranean space also holds a fifth bedroom, creating even more useable space that will cater for overnight guests or as accommodation for an au pair.

With a rather harsh material palette of black metal, full-height glass panels and concrete, the pavilion could easily feel quite cold, however, the surrounding lush greenery and the rounded forms and plush textures of the client-chosen furniture, along with the wall art, creates a warm, comfortable aesthetic. Blackened cedar also adds a natural texture into the space.

The pavilion space has been designed for outdoor living throughout the seasons. A back-to-back outdoor fireplace allows for year-round entertaining and relaxing in both the living room and the outdoor room, which is covered by retractable, pivoting louvres that control sunshine and shade levels. Opposite, a recessed spa pool nestles into one end of a tiled lap pool.

Internally, large cavity sliders demarcate different rooms, ensuring that all spaces are flexible and can be completely closed or opened as needed, while underfloor heating keeps the spaces toasty warm during the colder months.

“With the Herne Bay house, I wanted to create a type of theatre, where you arrive at the front door of the villa, descend a couple of steps at the end of the hallway and are completely surprised as you enter this sunlit, modernist glass pavilion,” says John.

“It’s like chalk and cheese: a horizontal, black and minimal form that is a total contrast to the vertical, white and frilly villa. It doesn’t sound like it should work, but the old and new seem to get on just fine!”

Words by Amelia Melbourne-Hayward.

Images by Simon Wilson.

Visit professional's website
Enquire about the process / fees
Contact details

Products in this project

Show more categories!

Professionals used on this project

Also from Studio John Irving Architects

Show more categories!
Done tagging
Full screen

The Anti-villa

What to do with a delipidated Victorian villa located on one of the strictest heritage conservation streets in all of Auckland? Local architecture practice Studio John Irving decided not to play it safe and ended up rebuilding the house from scratch, introducing a “rather unsympathetic addition” at the back that could almost be called an anti-villa.

Project architect John Irving says, “This is certainly a house of two halves, because, street-side, we had to retain its heritage character but, out the back and somewhat hidden away, we have introduced a sleek, minimal and highly modern addition.”

It was certainly time for an update for the old villa, which had been butchered over the years and had seen some ‘interesting’ additions, such as aluminium joinery, a filled-in veranda, the removal of the central hallway, and a Skyline garage tacked onto the side of it. The sad state of the house was further illustrated when the builders started to demolish it and the entire house completely fell apart.

John says that, while the brief from the clients was quite open, the main ideas were to keep all the living areas out the back in the addition, and the bedrooms and bathrooms located in the villa. “The clients wanted everything to be very contemporary – they were really in love with the idea of a minimal, modernist living pavilion that would set up a great juxtaposition between the traditional villa and the new addition.”

They also wanted garaging underneath the home, which meant that the entire house had to be raised up during construction to install a new double garage. While the house can still be entered via the front door, there’s now the option to drive in underneath and enter the home through the basement. This large subterranean space also holds a fifth bedroom, creating even more useable space that will cater for overnight guests or as accommodation for an au pair.

With a rather harsh material palette of black metal, full-height glass panels and concrete, the pavilion could easily feel quite cold, however, the surrounding lush greenery and the rounded forms and plush textures of the client-chosen furniture, along with the wall art, creates a warm, comfortable aesthetic. Blackened cedar also adds a natural texture into the space.

The pavilion space has been designed for outdoor living throughout the seasons. A back-to-back outdoor fireplace allows for year-round entertaining and relaxing in both the living room and the outdoor room, which is covered by retractable, pivoting louvres that control sunshine and shade levels. Opposite, a recessed spa pool nestles into one end of a tiled lap pool.

Internally, large cavity sliders demarcate different rooms, ensuring that all spaces are flexible and can be completely closed or opened as needed, while underfloor heating keeps the spaces toasty warm during the colder months.

“With the Herne Bay house, I wanted to create a type of theatre, where you arrive at the front door of the villa, descend a couple of steps at the end of the hallway and are completely surprised as you enter this sunlit, modernist glass pavilion,” says John.

“It’s like chalk and cheese: a horizontal, black and minimal form that is a total contrast to the vertical, white and frilly villa. It doesn’t sound like it should work, but the old and new seem to get on just fine!”

Words by Amelia Melbourne-Hayward.

Images by Simon Wilson.

Visit professional's website
Enquire about the process / fees
Contact details

Products in this project

Show more categories!

Professionals used on this project

Also from Studio John Irving Architects

Show more categories!
Done tagging
Full screen

The Anti-villa

What to do with a delipidated Victorian villa located on one of the strictest heritage conservation streets in all of Auckland? Local architecture practice Studio John Irving decided not to play it safe and ended up rebuilding the house from scratch, introducing a “rather unsympathetic addition” at the back that could almost be called an anti-villa.

Project architect John Irving says, “This is certainly a house of two halves, because, street-side, we had to retain its heritage character but, out the back and somewhat hidden away, we have introduced a sleek, minimal and highly modern addition.”

It was certainly time for an update for the old villa, which had been butchered over the years and had seen some ‘interesting’ additions, such as aluminium joinery, a filled-in veranda, the removal of the central hallway, and a Skyline garage tacked onto the side of it. The sad state of the house was further illustrated when the builders started to demolish it and the entire house completely fell apart.

John says that, while the brief from the clients was quite open, the main ideas were to keep all the living areas out the back in the addition, and the bedrooms and bathrooms located in the villa. “The clients wanted everything to be very contemporary – they were really in love with the idea of a minimal, modernist living pavilion that would set up a great juxtaposition between the traditional villa and the new addition.”

They also wanted garaging underneath the home, which meant that the entire house had to be raised up during construction to install a new double garage. While the house can still be entered via the front door, there’s now the option to drive in underneath and enter the home through the basement. This large subterranean space also holds a fifth bedroom, creating even more useable space that will cater for overnight guests or as accommodation for an au pair.

With a rather harsh material palette of black metal, full-height glass panels and concrete, the pavilion could easily feel quite cold, however, the surrounding lush greenery and the rounded forms and plush textures of the client-chosen furniture, along with the wall art, creates a warm, comfortable aesthetic. Blackened cedar also adds a natural texture into the space.

The pavilion space has been designed for outdoor living throughout the seasons. A back-to-back outdoor fireplace allows for year-round entertaining and relaxing in both the living room and the outdoor room, which is covered by retractable, pivoting louvres that control sunshine and shade levels. Opposite, a recessed spa pool nestles into one end of a tiled lap pool.

Internally, large cavity sliders demarcate different rooms, ensuring that all spaces are flexible and can be completely closed or opened as needed, while underfloor heating keeps the spaces toasty warm during the colder months.

“With the Herne Bay house, I wanted to create a type of theatre, where you arrive at the front door of the villa, descend a couple of steps at the end of the hallway and are completely surprised as you enter this sunlit, modernist glass pavilion,” says John.

“It’s like chalk and cheese: a horizontal, black and minimal form that is a total contrast to the vertical, white and frilly villa. It doesn’t sound like it should work, but the old and new seem to get on just fine!”

Words by Amelia Melbourne-Hayward.

Images by Simon Wilson.

Visit professional's website
Enquire about the process / fees
Contact details
Done tagging
Full screen