Newtown Park, Wellington

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Originally constructed from 1967 on the site of an old tram depot, the Wellington City Council rental housing at Newtown Park consists of three large towers and two lower buildings. All have undergone extensive upgrade and refurbishment to bring them up to current Building Code requirements and to improve safety and security for residents.

At the same time, other design features of the buildings and the surrounding landscaped grounds have been addressed; in particular, the project focussed on giving each tower building more of a distinct identity and a clearly recognisable entry. In response to the changing demographics of tenants, the number of family-sized units has been increased, particularly on the ground floors where units have direct access to outdoor areas. A careful and thorough analysis of the existing built fabric has produced a cost-effective design that has created unit typologies much better suited to tenants.

Externally, public, semi-private and private space are now more clearly delineated and outdoor areas are strategically linked to the surrounding sub-urban context. Landscaping work has also been influenced by design principles such as crime prevention through environmental design, improving safety and security for residents. With a view to reducing the extent of the site given over to vehicle circulation and promoting a sense of community, a new courtyard space has replaced a section of roading. This ‘home zone’ provides a recreational area for bikes, scooters and ball games, extending and complementing existing central outdoor community space, as well as making a significant contribution to the family-friendly quality of the flats.

Photography: Patrick Reynolds.

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Newtown Park, Wellington

Originally constructed from 1967 on the site of an old tram depot, the Wellington City Council rental housing at Newtown Park consists of three large towers and two lower buildings. All have undergone extensive upgrade and refurbishment to bring them up to current Building Code requirements and to improve safety and security for residents.

At the same time, other design features of the buildings and the surrounding landscaped grounds have been addressed; in particular, the project focussed on giving each tower building more of a distinct identity and a clearly recognisable entry. In response to the changing demographics of tenants, the number of family-sized units has been increased, particularly on the ground floors where units have direct access to outdoor areas. A careful and thorough analysis of the existing built fabric has produced a cost-effective design that has created unit typologies much better suited to tenants.

Externally, public, semi-private and private space are now more clearly delineated and outdoor areas are strategically linked to the surrounding sub-urban context. Landscaping work has also been influenced by design principles such as crime prevention through environmental design, improving safety and security for residents. With a view to reducing the extent of the site given over to vehicle circulation and promoting a sense of community, a new courtyard space has replaced a section of roading. This ‘home zone’ provides a recreational area for bikes, scooters and ball games, extending and complementing existing central outdoor community space, as well as making a significant contribution to the family-friendly quality of the flats.

Photography: Patrick Reynolds.

Visit professional's website
Enquire about the process / fees
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Professionals used on this project

Also from Studio Pacific Architecture

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Newtown Park, Wellington

Originally constructed from 1967 on the site of an old tram depot, the Wellington City Council rental housing at Newtown Park consists of three large towers and two lower buildings. All have undergone extensive upgrade and refurbishment to bring them up to current Building Code requirements and to improve safety and security for residents.

At the same time, other design features of the buildings and the surrounding landscaped grounds have been addressed; in particular, the project focussed on giving each tower building more of a distinct identity and a clearly recognisable entry. In response to the changing demographics of tenants, the number of family-sized units has been increased, particularly on the ground floors where units have direct access to outdoor areas. A careful and thorough analysis of the existing built fabric has produced a cost-effective design that has created unit typologies much better suited to tenants.

Externally, public, semi-private and private space are now more clearly delineated and outdoor areas are strategically linked to the surrounding sub-urban context. Landscaping work has also been influenced by design principles such as crime prevention through environmental design, improving safety and security for residents. With a view to reducing the extent of the site given over to vehicle circulation and promoting a sense of community, a new courtyard space has replaced a section of roading. This ‘home zone’ provides a recreational area for bikes, scooters and ball games, extending and complementing existing central outdoor community space, as well as making a significant contribution to the family-friendly quality of the flats.

Photography: Patrick Reynolds.

Visit professional's website
Enquire about the process / fees
Contact details
Done tagging
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