Department of Conservation

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The Department of Conservation was launched in 1987 and tasked with managing, and protecting, the country’s natural and historical heritage.These important national treasures included natural heritage, recreation facilities, and the coastal marine environment. Because DOC is responsible for the entire country it sometimes requires innovative ways to move people – and wildlife – to far-flung places. Often this leads to truly ‘uplifting’ ideas designed to achieve maximum coverage for minimum cost.

A housing solution that really took off
When the Department needed to mobilise forces for a major undertaking on a number of Fiordland islands they were forced to think outside the box.

The plan was to rid these islands – which had been labelled ‘restoration islands’ – of pests and predators, thus protecting the native plants and species already in residence. Once this ‘beachhead’ was established the second phase was to provide a safe and secure haven for many of New Zealand’s more threatened species, including the Saddleback and the Kiwi.

The most ambitious island re-claiming project took place on Resolution Island. The staff at DOC’s Te Anau office took on the challenge of finding the best way to house the ‘troops’ who would take part in the project. These included track cutters, stoat trappers and deer hunters who would all be involved in the battle to restore the island.

The solution came in the creation of 13 ‘flyable’ huts that would be helicoptered into place and then flown out once the job was completed. The building material of choice was New Zealand steel’s own COLORSTEEL® ENDURA® (for the roofing and cladding) and AXXIS® (steel for framing) products.

As the project evolved a number of enhancements were made. This included a reduction in the steel required for framing, including the built-in bracing. The flexibility of building with steel allowed these to be made with little disruption. The end product was a lighter, stronger and cheaper building.

Not only could the hut be airlifted, but so could its associated timber framed annexe. Originally these two units needed to be flown separately but the new solution reduced the number of flying hours required and made it a breeze to install, and handle, each unit on site.

Material: COLORSTEEL® ENDURA® in Karaka

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Department of Conservation

The Department of Conservation was launched in 1987 and tasked with managing, and protecting, the country’s natural and historical heritage.These important national treasures included natural heritage, recreation facilities, and the coastal marine environment. Because DOC is responsible for the entire country it sometimes requires innovative ways to move people – and wildlife – to far-flung places. Often this leads to truly ‘uplifting’ ideas designed to achieve maximum coverage for minimum cost.

A housing solution that really took off
When the Department needed to mobilise forces for a major undertaking on a number of Fiordland islands they were forced to think outside the box.

The plan was to rid these islands – which had been labelled ‘restoration islands’ – of pests and predators, thus protecting the native plants and species already in residence. Once this ‘beachhead’ was established the second phase was to provide a safe and secure haven for many of New Zealand’s more threatened species, including the Saddleback and the Kiwi.

The most ambitious island re-claiming project took place on Resolution Island. The staff at DOC’s Te Anau office took on the challenge of finding the best way to house the ‘troops’ who would take part in the project. These included track cutters, stoat trappers and deer hunters who would all be involved in the battle to restore the island.

The solution came in the creation of 13 ‘flyable’ huts that would be helicoptered into place and then flown out once the job was completed. The building material of choice was New Zealand steel’s own COLORSTEEL® ENDURA® (for the roofing and cladding) and AXXIS® (steel for framing) products.

As the project evolved a number of enhancements were made. This included a reduction in the steel required for framing, including the built-in bracing. The flexibility of building with steel allowed these to be made with little disruption. The end product was a lighter, stronger and cheaper building.

Not only could the hut be airlifted, but so could its associated timber framed annexe. Originally these two units needed to be flown separately but the new solution reduced the number of flying hours required and made it a breeze to install, and handle, each unit on site.

Material: COLORSTEEL® ENDURA® in Karaka

Visit professional's website
Enquire about the process / fees
Contact details

Products in this project

Professionals used on this project

Also from COLORSTEEL®

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Done tagging
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Department of Conservation

The Department of Conservation was launched in 1987 and tasked with managing, and protecting, the country’s natural and historical heritage.These important national treasures included natural heritage, recreation facilities, and the coastal marine environment. Because DOC is responsible for the entire country it sometimes requires innovative ways to move people – and wildlife – to far-flung places. Often this leads to truly ‘uplifting’ ideas designed to achieve maximum coverage for minimum cost.

A housing solution that really took off
When the Department needed to mobilise forces for a major undertaking on a number of Fiordland islands they were forced to think outside the box.

The plan was to rid these islands – which had been labelled ‘restoration islands’ – of pests and predators, thus protecting the native plants and species already in residence. Once this ‘beachhead’ was established the second phase was to provide a safe and secure haven for many of New Zealand’s more threatened species, including the Saddleback and the Kiwi.

The most ambitious island re-claiming project took place on Resolution Island. The staff at DOC’s Te Anau office took on the challenge of finding the best way to house the ‘troops’ who would take part in the project. These included track cutters, stoat trappers and deer hunters who would all be involved in the battle to restore the island.

The solution came in the creation of 13 ‘flyable’ huts that would be helicoptered into place and then flown out once the job was completed. The building material of choice was New Zealand steel’s own COLORSTEEL® ENDURA® (for the roofing and cladding) and AXXIS® (steel for framing) products.

As the project evolved a number of enhancements were made. This included a reduction in the steel required for framing, including the built-in bracing. The flexibility of building with steel allowed these to be made with little disruption. The end product was a lighter, stronger and cheaper building.

Not only could the hut be airlifted, but so could its associated timber framed annexe. Originally these two units needed to be flown separately but the new solution reduced the number of flying hours required and made it a breeze to install, and handle, each unit on site.

Material: COLORSTEEL® ENDURA® in Karaka

Visit professional's website
Enquire about the process / fees
Contact details

Products in this project

Professionals used on this project

Done tagging
Full screen