Kirkwood Avenue

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This California bungalow in Fendalton Road has been a favorite of mine since a young boy. It has a certain mysterious presence with its riverstone features and sloped walls clad in black cedar weatherboard and cedar shingles. Some say its haunted. “Los Angeles” House was designed by John Steele Guthrie probably around 1909 however, the exact date has never been fully confirmed. While typical California bungalows have a distinctive raised profile, this bungalow sits lower to the ground with a fairly muted entrance but exhibits the long, low roofline commonly associated with this type of bungalow. What I probably find most appealing is its groundedness, which I think comes from the low pitched roofs, use of natural materials and the solidity due to the sloping walls and use of stone. There used to be big, stone chimneys but these had to be removed after the earthquakes. The craftsmanship is admirable which is often sadly missing from typical modern homes. I think its stood the test of time and survived the earthquakes. Proof that really good design can be timeless and enduring.

Therefore, I was really excited when a client came to me who was really fond of this house and wanted to use it as the inspiration for their next project. Their new house is a modern reinterpretation of the California bungalow style but also with significant Japanese influence and up-to-the-minute building methodologies to create a high performance, energy efficient, sustainable home.

Work is well underway at Kirkwood Ave Ilam on a new house that is a modern reinterpretation of the California bungalow style but also with significant Japanese influence. It takes inspiration from the 1909 Los Angeles house, Fendalton, Christchurch. Aside from the familiarity of the aesthetic the building methodologies are completely different incorporating the latest technolgies and including Ecopanel structural insulated wall system to create a high performance, energy efficient, sustainable home. The Los Angeles House features on a TV series called the New Zealand Home which can be viewed on demand, 17mins into the program https://www.tvnz.co.nz/shows/the-new-zealand-home/episodes/s2015-e2

The sloping stone and timber walls mean the foundations have been a bit complicated, but Dan Saunders Construction have taken it all in their stride. Construction of the garage that’s designed to be in keeping with the house, has been prioritised to allow for the provision of some early storage. The floor plan is completely different with a Japanese influence to the planning where there is no hallway and spaces follow from one to another eliminating waste space. Shoji sliding doors allow the space to be opened up or closed down depending on the desired usage from time to time.

LOS ANGELES 1909

 

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Kirkwood Avenue

This California bungalow in Fendalton Road has been a favorite of mine since a young boy. It has a certain mysterious presence with its riverstone features and sloped walls clad in black cedar weatherboard and cedar shingles. Some say its haunted. “Los Angeles” House was designed by John Steele Guthrie probably around 1909 however, the exact date has never been fully confirmed. While typical California bungalows have a distinctive raised profile, this bungalow sits lower to the ground with a fairly muted entrance but exhibits the long, low roofline commonly associated with this type of bungalow. What I probably find most appealing is its groundedness, which I think comes from the low pitched roofs, use of natural materials and the solidity due to the sloping walls and use of stone. There used to be big, stone chimneys but these had to be removed after the earthquakes. The craftsmanship is admirable which is often sadly missing from typical modern homes. I think its stood the test of time and survived the earthquakes. Proof that really good design can be timeless and enduring.

Therefore, I was really excited when a client came to me who was really fond of this house and wanted to use it as the inspiration for their next project. Their new house is a modern reinterpretation of the California bungalow style but also with significant Japanese influence and up-to-the-minute building methodologies to create a high performance, energy efficient, sustainable home.

Work is well underway at Kirkwood Ave Ilam on a new house that is a modern reinterpretation of the California bungalow style but also with significant Japanese influence. It takes inspiration from the 1909 Los Angeles house, Fendalton, Christchurch. Aside from the familiarity of the aesthetic the building methodologies are completely different incorporating the latest technolgies and including Ecopanel structural insulated wall system to create a high performance, energy efficient, sustainable home. The Los Angeles House features on a TV series called the New Zealand Home which can be viewed on demand, 17mins into the program https://www.tvnz.co.nz/shows/the-new-zealand-home/episodes/s2015-e2

The sloping stone and timber walls mean the foundations have been a bit complicated, but Dan Saunders Construction have taken it all in their stride. Construction of the garage that’s designed to be in keeping with the house, has been prioritised to allow for the provision of some early storage. The floor plan is completely different with a Japanese influence to the planning where there is no hallway and spaces follow from one to another eliminating waste space. Shoji sliding doors allow the space to be opened up or closed down depending on the desired usage from time to time.

LOS ANGELES 1909

 

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Professionals used on this project

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Kirkwood Avenue

This California bungalow in Fendalton Road has been a favorite of mine since a young boy. It has a certain mysterious presence with its riverstone features and sloped walls clad in black cedar weatherboard and cedar shingles. Some say its haunted. “Los Angeles” House was designed by John Steele Guthrie probably around 1909 however, the exact date has never been fully confirmed. While typical California bungalows have a distinctive raised profile, this bungalow sits lower to the ground with a fairly muted entrance but exhibits the long, low roofline commonly associated with this type of bungalow. What I probably find most appealing is its groundedness, which I think comes from the low pitched roofs, use of natural materials and the solidity due to the sloping walls and use of stone. There used to be big, stone chimneys but these had to be removed after the earthquakes. The craftsmanship is admirable which is often sadly missing from typical modern homes. I think its stood the test of time and survived the earthquakes. Proof that really good design can be timeless and enduring.

Therefore, I was really excited when a client came to me who was really fond of this house and wanted to use it as the inspiration for their next project. Their new house is a modern reinterpretation of the California bungalow style but also with significant Japanese influence and up-to-the-minute building methodologies to create a high performance, energy efficient, sustainable home.

Work is well underway at Kirkwood Ave Ilam on a new house that is a modern reinterpretation of the California bungalow style but also with significant Japanese influence. It takes inspiration from the 1909 Los Angeles house, Fendalton, Christchurch. Aside from the familiarity of the aesthetic the building methodologies are completely different incorporating the latest technolgies and including Ecopanel structural insulated wall system to create a high performance, energy efficient, sustainable home. The Los Angeles House features on a TV series called the New Zealand Home which can be viewed on demand, 17mins into the program https://www.tvnz.co.nz/shows/the-new-zealand-home/episodes/s2015-e2

The sloping stone and timber walls mean the foundations have been a bit complicated, but Dan Saunders Construction have taken it all in their stride. Construction of the garage that’s designed to be in keeping with the house, has been prioritised to allow for the provision of some early storage. The floor plan is completely different with a Japanese influence to the planning where there is no hallway and spaces follow from one to another eliminating waste space. Shoji sliding doors allow the space to be opened up or closed down depending on the desired usage from time to time.

LOS ANGELES 1909

 

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