The Vicarage - Callidus Architects | ArchiPro

The Vicarage

This project involved the renovation of a heritage 2 category listed building in Seatoun, Wellington. Originally the landmark building was built in 1924 as St Georges Church Vicarage in the English Domestic Revival style intended to create the impression of an English country village vicarage. Designed by renowned architect P.H. Graham recognised for his architecture in both London and New Zealand. The materials of the façade are rendered cement over triple brick, exposed decorative brickwork, terracotta window sills and a Marseilles tile roof.

It remained as a vicarage until 2015 when it went on the market for the very first time. Now a private residential home the owners embarked on an extensive renovation plan covering re-instatement/repair works to the exterior where required and seismic upgrading of the building overall. A general renovation of the property also intended to make fit for purpose in terms of operating as a family dwelling. In consultation with Heritage NZ the project was within the scope of best practice guidelines and they offered their full support of the project.

‘The Vicarage’ was a project where family friendly modern-day convenience and functionality was introduced to an attractive period building enhancing the original character.

The colour scheme chosen for this project considered the period of the building and the clients wishes for a neutral colour scheme. A colour consultant advised that the 1920s in New Zealand saw the use of pale colours such as off whites, buffs and creams for the body of the house and dark greens, dark reds and even blacks for trims. These paint choices were used in the interior and exterior of the vicarage.

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This project involved the renovation of a heritage 2 category listed building in Seatoun, Wellington. Originally the landmark building was built in 1924 as St Georges Church Vicarage in the English Domestic Revival style intended to create the impression of an English country village vicarage. Designed by renowned architect P.H. Graham recognised for his architecture in both London and New Zealand. The materials of the façade are rendered cement over triple brick, exposed decorative brickwork, terracotta window sills and a Marseilles tile roof.

It remained as a vicarage until 2015 when it went on the market for the very first time. Now a private residential home the owners embarked on an extensive renovation plan covering re-instatement/repair works to the exterior where required and seismic upgrading of the building overall. A general renovation of the property also intended to make fit for purpose in terms of operating as a family dwelling. In consultation with Heritage NZ the project was within the scope of best practice guidelines and they offered their full support of the project.

‘The Vicarage’ was a project where family friendly modern-day convenience and functionality was introduced to an attractive period building enhancing the original character.

The colour scheme chosen for this project considered the period of the building and the clients wishes for a neutral colour scheme. A colour consultant advised that the 1920s in New Zealand saw the use of pale colours such as off whites, buffs and creams for the body of the house and dark greens, dark reds and even blacks for trims. These paint choices were used in the interior and exterior of the vicarage.

Visit professional's website
Enquire about the process / fees
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Professionals used on this project

All
Projects
Products
Professionals
Articles

This project involved the renovation of a heritage 2 category listed building in Seatoun, Wellington. Originally the landmark building was built in 1924 as St Georges Church Vicarage in the English Domestic Revival style intended to create the impression of an English country village vicarage. Designed by renowned architect P.H. Graham recognised for his architecture in both London and New Zealand. The materials of the façade are rendered cement over triple brick, exposed decorative brickwork, terracotta window sills and a Marseilles tile roof.

It remained as a vicarage until 2015 when it went on the market for the very first time. Now a private residential home the owners embarked on an extensive renovation plan covering re-instatement/repair works to the exterior where required and seismic upgrading of the building overall. A general renovation of the property also intended to make fit for purpose in terms of operating as a family dwelling. In consultation with Heritage NZ the project was within the scope of best practice guidelines and they offered their full support of the project.

‘The Vicarage’ was a project where family friendly modern-day convenience and functionality was introduced to an attractive period building enhancing the original character.

The colour scheme chosen for this project considered the period of the building and the clients wishes for a neutral colour scheme. A colour consultant advised that the 1920s in New Zealand saw the use of pale colours such as off whites, buffs and creams for the body of the house and dark greens, dark reds and even blacks for trims. These paint choices were used in the interior and exterior of the vicarage.

Visit professional's website
Enquire about the process / fees
Contact details

Professionals used on this project